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What is the basic difference between stack and queue??

Please help me i am unable to find the difference.

How do you differentiate a stack and a queue?

I searched for the answer in various links and found this answer..

In high level programming,

a stack is defined as a list or sequence of elements that is lengthened by placing new elements "on top" of existing elements and shortened by removing elements from the top of existing elements. It is an ADT[Abstract Data Type] with math operations of "push" and "pop".

A queue is a sequence of elements that is added to by placing the new element at the rear of existing and shortened by removing elements in front of queue. It is an ADT[Abstract Data Type]. There is more to these terms understood in programming of Java, C++, Python and so on.

Can i have an answer which is more detailed? Please help me.

  • 12
    You seem to have answered your own question - a stack is a Last-In First-Out (LIFO) container, and a queue is a First-In First-Out (FIFO) container. – Iridium Jun 11 '12 at 5:47

11 Answers 11

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Stack is a LIFO (last in first out) data structure. The associated link to wikipedia contains detailed description and examples.

Queue is a FIFO (first in first out) data structure. The associated link to wikipedia contains detailed description and examples.

109

Imagine a stack of paper. The last piece put into the stack is on the top, so it is the first one to come out. This is LIFO. Adding a piece of paper is called "pushing", and removing a piece of paper is called "popping".

Imagine a queue at the store. The first person in line is the first person to get out of line. This is FIFO. A person getting into line is "enqueued", and a person getting out of line is "dequeued".

  • 1
    One of the best analogies I can think of. – Yeikel Feb 3 '18 at 4:32
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A visual model

Pancake Stack (LIFO)

The only way to add one and/or remove one is from the top.

pancake stack

Line Queue (FIFO)

When one arrives they arrive at the end of the queue and when one leaves they leave at the front of the queue.

dmv line

Fun fact: the British refer to lines of people as a Queue

  • 4
    Jee, this must be the answer imo. Thanks @Jacksonkr – Kulasangar Oct 24 '17 at 7:11
  • Haha well sure this is a perfect description of Queue and Stack, but just for arguments sake, what if I want the first pancake added to the plate? I know this can be completed with a stack.size() vs. if(!stack.isEmpty()), but still that first pancake might be the best one :)... Either way, nice answer and I agree this is the clearest...seems interesting that the British refer to lines as Queues though (if that is accurate), in non-programming language I would still consider that a line where the first entry gets to leave first (after exiting the line/queue) – ViaTech Apr 11 '18 at 23:05
  • why this is not the best answer? lol – Ezeewei May 18 '18 at 14:10
36

You can think of both as an ordered list of things (ordered by the time at which they were added to the list). The main difference between the two is how new elements enter the list and old elements leave the list.

For a stack, if I have a list a, b, c, and I add d, it gets tacked on the end, so I end up with a,b,c,d. If I want to pop an element of the list, I remove the last element I added, which is d. After a pop, my list is now a,b,c again

For a queue, I add new elements in the same way. a,b,c becomes a,b,c,d after adding d. But, now when I pop, I have to take an element from the front of the list, so it becomes b,c,d.

It's very simple!

14

Queue

Queue is a ordered collection of items.

Items are deleted at one end called ‘front’ end of the queue.

Items are inserted at other end called ‘rear’ of the queue.

The first item inserted is the first to be removed (FIFO).

Stack

Stack is a collection of items.

It allows access to only one data item: the last item inserted.

Items are inserted & deleted at one end called ‘Top of the stack’.

It is a dynamic & constantly changing object.

All the data items are put on top of the stack and taken off the top

This structure of accessing is known as Last in First out structure (LIFO)

  • So basically a 'queue' is a "FIFO" - first in first out queue. While a 'stack' is a "LIFO" - last in first out queue. Am I correct? – Sebastian Nielsen May 28 '17 at 14:47
  • @SebastianNielsen Yes correct as mention in the answer. – Dissanayake May 30 '17 at 5:37
  • But what is the difference then between a linked list and a stack? Isn't it the same? – Sebastian Nielsen May 30 '17 at 8:05
  • @SebastianNielsen The stack is an ADT, which means it exposes an interface, which is the push and pop operation, but the underlying mechanism (implementation) is hidden from the end user. A stack can be implemented with an array or with a linked list. – gdyrrahitis Aug 21 '18 at 20:38
13

STACK:

  1. Stack is defined as a list of element in which we can insert or delete elements only at the top of the stack.
  2. The behaviour of a stack is like a Last-In First-Out(LIFO) system.
  3. Stack is used to pass parameters between function. On a call to a function, the parameters and local variables are stored on a stack.
  4. High-level programming languages such as Pascal, c, etc. that provide support for recursion use the stack for bookkeeping. Remember in each recursive call, there is a need to save the current value of parameters, local variables, and the return address (the address to which the control has to return after the call).

QUEUE:

  1. Queue is a collection of the same type of element. It is a linear list in which insertions can take place at one end of the list,called rear of the list, and deletions can take place only at other end, called the front of the list
  2. The behaviour of a queue is like a First-In-First-Out (FIFO) system.
  • I'm pretty sure you can insert at the end or start of a stack too, I think the important thing to note here is the FIFO vs. LIFO – Mike Jul 15 '15 at 19:39
5

A stack is a collection of elements, which can be stored and retrieved one at a time. Elements are retrieved in reverse order of their time of storage, i.e. the latest element stored is the next element to be retrieved. A stack is sometimes referred to as a Last-In-First-Out (LIFO) or First-In-Last-Out (FILO) structure. Elements previously stored cannot be retrieved until the latest element (usually referred to as the 'top' element) has been retrieved.

A queue is a collection of elements, which can be stored and retrieved one at a time. Elements are retrieved in order of their time of storage, i.e. the first element stored is the next element to be retrieved. A queue is sometimes referred to as a First-In-First-Out (FIFO) or Last-In-Last-Out (LILO) structure. Elements subsequently stored cannot be retrieved until the first element (usually referred to as the 'front' element) has been retrieved.

1

STACK: Stack is defined as a list of element in which we can insert or delete elements only at the top of the stack

Stack is used to pass parameters between function. On a call to a function, the parameters and local variables are stored on a stack.

A stack is a collection of elements, which can be stored and retrieved one at a time. Elements are retrieved in reverse order of their time of storage, i.e. the latest element stored is the next element to be retrieved. A stack is sometimes referred to as a Last-In-First-Out (LIFO) or First-In-Last-Out (FILO) structure. Elements previously stored cannot be retrieved until the latest element (usually referred to as the 'top' element) has been retrieved.

QUEUE:

Queue is a collection of the same type of element. It is a linear list in which insertions can take place at one end of the list,called rear of the list, and deletions can take place only at other end, called the front of the list

A queue is a collection of elements, which can be stored and retrieved one at a time. Elements are retrieved in order of their time of storage, i.e. the first element stored is the next element to be retrieved. A queue is sometimes referred to as a First-In-First-Out (FIFO) or Last-In-Last-Out (LILO) structure. Elements subsequently stored cannot be retrieved until the first element (usually referred to as the 'front' element) has been retrieved.

1

To try and over-simplify the description of a stack and a queue, They are both dynamic chains of information elements that can be accessed from one end of the chain and the only real difference between them is the fact that:

when working with a stack

  • you insert elements at one end of the chain and
  • you retrieve and/or remove elements from the same end of the chain

while with a queue

  • you insert elements at one end of the chain and
  • you retrieve/remove them from the other end

NOTE: I am using the abstract wording of retrieve/remove in this context because there are instances when you just retrieve the element from the chain or in a sense just read it or access its value, but there also instances when you remove the element from the chain and finally there are instances when you do both actions with the same call.

Also the word element is purposely used in order to abstract the imaginary chain as much as possible and decouple it from specific programming language terms. This abstract information entity called element could be anything, from a pointer, a value, a string or characters, an object,... depending on the language.

In most cases, though it is actually either a value or a memory location (i.e. a pointer). And the rest are just hiding this fact behind the language jargon<

A queue can be helpful when the order of the elements is important and needs to be exactly the same as when the elements first came into your program. For instance when you process an audio stream or when you buffer network data. Or when you do any type of store and forward processing. In all of these cases you need the sequence of the elements to be output in the same order as they came into your program, otherwise the information may stop making sense. So, you could break your program in a part that reads data from some input, does some processing and writes them in a queue and a part that retrieves data from the queue processes them and stores them in another queue for further processing or transmitting the data.

A stack can be helpful when you need to temporarily store an element that is going to be used in the immediate step(s) of your program. For instance, programming languages usually use a stack structure to pass variables to functions. What they actually do is store (or push) the function arguments in the stack and then jump to the function where they remove and retrieve (or pop) the same number of elements from the stack. That way the size of the stack is dependent of the number of nested calls of functions. Additionally, after a function has been called and finished what it was doing, it leaves the stack in the exact same condition as before it has being called! That way any function can operate with the stack ignoring how other functions operate with it.

Lastly, you should know that there are other terms used out-there for the same of similar concepts. For instance a stack could be called a heap. There are also hybrid versions of these concepts, for instance a double-ended queue can behave at the same time as a stack and as a queue, because it can be accessed by both ends simultaneously. Additionally, the fact that a data structure is provided to you as a stack or as a queue it does not necessarily mean that it is implemented as such, there are instances in which a data structure can be implemented as anything and be provided as a specific data structure simply because it can be made to behave like such. In other words, if you provide a push and pop method to any data structure, they magically become stacks!

  • Don't use code formatting for text that isn't code. – user207421 Dec 30 '16 at 22:59
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STACK is a LIFO (last in, first out) list. means suppose 3 elements are inserted in stack i.e 10,20,30. 10 is inserted first & 30 is inserted last so 30 is first deleted from stack & 10 is last deleted from stack.this is an LIFO list(Last In First Out).

QUEUE is FIFO list(First In First Out).means one element is inserted first which is to be deleted first.e.g queue of peoples.

0

Stacks a considered a vertical collection. First understand that a collection is an OBJECT that gathers and organizes other smaller OBJECTS. These smaller OBJECTS are commonly referred to as Elements. These elements are "Pushed" on the stack in an A B C order where A is first and C is last. vertically it would look like this: 3rd element added) C 2nd element added) B 1st element added) A

Notice that the "A" which was first added to the stack is on the bottom. If you want to remove the "A" from the stack you first have to remove "C", then "B", and then finally your target element "A". The stack requires a LIFO approach while dealing with the complexities of a stack.(Last In First Out) When removing an element from a stack, the correct syntax is pop. we don't remove an element off a stack we "pop" it off.

Recall that "A" was the first element pushed on to the stack and "C" was the last item Pushed on the stack. Should you decide that you would like to see what is on bottom the stack, being the 3 elements are on the stack ordered A being the first B being the second and C being the third element, the top would have to be popped off then the second element added in order to view the bottom of the stack.

  • Please format your question to make it look better and more readable. – Neeku Apr 8 '14 at 17:01

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