8

I would like to programmatically create a gloss effect on an Image, kinda like on the Apple-inspired design that the Web has adopted when it was updated to 2.0 Beta.

Essentially this:

example icons http://nhc.hcmuns.googlepages.com/web2_icons.jpg

Now, I see two approaches here: I create one image which has an Alpha channel with the gloss effect, and then I just combine the input and the gloss alpha icon to create this.

The second approach: Create the Alpha Gloss Image in code and then merge it with the input graphic.

I would prefer the second solution, but I'm not much of a graphics person and I don't know what the algorhithm is called to create such effects. Can someone give me some pointers* for what I am actually looking here? is there a "gloss algorhitm" that has a name? or even a .net Implementation already?

*No, not those type of pointers.

2
  • Here's a photoshop tutorial that shows the process Commented Sep 20, 2008 at 23:46
  • Your first example image is broken, the link is dead?
    – rene
    Commented Jun 1, 2016 at 13:35

3 Answers 3

17

Thank you, Devin! Here is my C# Code for implementing your suggestion. It works quite good. Turning this into a community owned Wiki post, If someone likes to add some code, feel free to edit this.

example

(Example uses different values for Alpha and exposure than the code below)

Image img = Image.FromFile("rss-icon.jpg");
pictureBox1.Image = AddCircularGloss(img, 30,25,255,255,255);

public static Image AddCircularGloss(Image inputImage, int exposurePercentage, int transparency, int fillColorR, int fillColorG, int fillColorB)
{
    Bitmap outputImage = new Bitmap(inputImage);
    using (Graphics g = Graphics.FromImage(outputImage))
    {
        using (Pen p = new Pen(Color.FromArgb(transparency, fillColorR, fillColorG, fillColorB)))
        {
            // Looks jaggy otherwise
            g.SmoothingMode = SmoothingMode.HighQuality;
            g.CompositingQuality = CompositingQuality.HighQuality;
            int x, y;

            // 3 * Height looks best
            int diameter = outputImage.Height * 3;
            double imgPercent = (double)outputImage.Height / 100;
            x = 0 - outputImage.Width;

            // How many percent of the image to expose
            y = (0 - diameter) + (int)(imgPercent * exposurePercentage);
            g.FillEllipse(p.Brush, x, y, diameter, diameter);
        }
    }
    return outputImage;
}

(Changed after John's suggestion. I cannot dispose the Bitmap though, this has to be done by the caller of the function)

2
  • Is it just me or is there a slight alpha bloom on the bottom middle edge of some of those tiles?
    – davenpcj
    Commented Sep 21, 2008 at 1:52
  • On the last icon in the first row (i think it's MySpace), there is a little "gradient" or however you want to call it. Same for the RSS i believe. That is part of the base icon i think, but it maybe an exercise to create that programatically :) Commented Sep 21, 2008 at 2:47
8

I can explain that effect in graphic terms.

  1. Create an image around 3* the size of the icon.

  2. Within this image, create a circle where (the height of the icon) < radius < 2*(the height of the icon).

  3. Fill the circle with an alpha blend/transparency (to white) of say 10%.

  4. Crop that circle image into a new image of equal size to your icons, where the center of the circle is centered outside the viewing area but upwards by 1/2 the height of the smaller image.

If you then superimpose this image onto the original icon, the effect should look approximately like the above icons. It should be doable with imagemagick if you're keen on that, or you could go for one of the graphics API's depending on what language you want to use. From the steps above it should be straightforward to do programatically.

3

Responding to the C# code ... Overall, good job on getting the imaging going. I've had to do similar things with some of my apps in the past.

One piece of advice, however: All graphics objects in .NET are based on Windows GDI+ primitives. This means these objects require correct disposal to clean up their non-memory resources, much like file handles or database connections. You'll want to tweak the code a bit to support that correctly.

All of the GDI+ objects implement the IDisposable interface, making them functional with the using statement. Consider rewriting your code similarly to the following:

// Experiment with this value
int exposurePercentage = 40;

using (Image img = Image.FromFile("rss-icon.jpg"))
{
    using (Graphics g = Graphics.FromImage(img))
    {    
        // First Number = Alpha, Experiment with this value.
        using (Pen p = new Pen(Color.FromArgb(75, 255, 255, 255)))
        {
            // Looks jaggy otherwise
            g.SmoothingMode = System.Drawing.Drawing2D.SmoothingMode.AntiAlias;

            int x, y;

            // 3 * Height looks best
            int diameter = img.Height * 3;
            double imgPercent = (double)img.Height / 100;
            x = 0 - img.Width;

            // How many percent of the image to expose
            y = (0 - diameter) + (int)(imgPercent * exposurePercentage);

            g.FillEllipse(p.Brush, x, y, diameter, diameter);

            pictureBox1.Image = img;
        }
    }
}

(Bear in mind, unlike most of my samples, I haven't had a chance to compile and test this ... It's meant more as a sample of structuring the code for ensuring that there are no resource leaks, not as a finished product. There are probably better ways to abstract/structure that anyway. And strongly consider doing so -- toss this in a graphics library DLL that you can just reference in any project which needs these capabilities in the future!)

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