32

Do you know of a popular library (Apache, Google, etc, collections) which has a reliable Java implementation for a min-max heap, that is a heap which allows to peek its minimum and maximum value in O(1) and to remove an element in O(log n)?

30

From Guava: MinMaxPriorityQueue.

  • 1
    Especially since the original question asked about google-collections, which is now Guava. – Louis Wasserman Feb 2 '12 at 21:50
  • the only small disadvantage is lack of standard Deque implementation – Alex Salauyou Jun 29 '16 at 9:33
  • It doesn't satisfy the Deque contract, so that is working as intended. – Louis Wasserman Jun 29 '16 at 17:54
  • could you please clarify, why? The only difficulty I'm able to see is implementing Deque#removeFirstOccurrence() and removeLastOccurence() due to unstable nature of min-max heap – Alex Salauyou Jun 29 '16 at 20:37
  • 1
    No, the issue is that deques have to stay in the order you put in the elements. For example, the documentation of Deque specifies that when it is used like a queue, FIFO behavior results. MinMaxPriorityQueue could technically implement the methods, but it could not satisfy the contract. – Louis Wasserman Jun 29 '16 at 20:39
23

Instead of a max-min heap, could you use two instances of a java.util.PriorityQueue containing the same elements? The first instance would be passed a comparator which puts the maximum at the head, and the second instance would use a comparator which puts the minimum at the head.

The downside is that add, delete, etc would have to be performed on both structures, but it should satisfy your requirements.

  • 5
    +1. This is a good answer given the stated requirements to peek the root in O(1) and remove it in O(log.n). Note however, that a PriorityQueue doesn't implement all heap operations (e.g. decreaseKey, increaseKey). – dty Sep 16 '10 at 12:36
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    Note that the no-argument remove(), which removes from the head of the queue, is O(log(n)), whereas remove(Object o), is O(n). Reference: docs.oracle.com/javase/8/docs/api/java/util/PriorityQueue.html – erwaman Jun 1 '16 at 13:48
  • 1
    Downvoted because removal won't be O(log n) anymore. Removing the minimum from one of the queues is O(log n), but removing the identical item, which will be at the end of the other queue, is O(n). – Jim Mischel Aug 12 '16 at 15:13
  • @JimMischel That was my thought, but then I realized we could still still make the two heap solution work in the following way. When we extract/peek max, we only do it from the max heap, and vice versa for min heap. This, of course, results in two inconsistent heaps. We keep track of the last max extracted and last min extracted, so that when they coincide, the data structure is empty. This would work if we don't need to support insertion and key changes (after extraction has been done), which the OP did not specify as requirements. – flow2k Aug 9 '18 at 16:01
15

Java has good tools in order to implement min and max heaps. My suggestion is using the priority queue data structure in order to implement these heaps. For implementing the max heap with priority queue try this:

import java.util.PriorityQueue;

public class MaxHeapWithPriorityQueue {

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        // create priority queue
        PriorityQueue<Integer> prq = new PriorityQueue<>((x,y) -> y-x);

        // insert values in the queue
        prq.add(6);
        prq.add(9);
        prq.add(5);
        prq.add(64);
        prq.add(6);

        //print values
        while (!prq.isEmpty()) {
            System.out.print(prq.poll()+" ");
        }
    }

}

For implementing the min heap with priority queue, try this:

import java.util.PriorityQueue;

public class MinHeapWithPriorityQueue {

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        // create priority queue
        PriorityQueue< Integer > prq = new PriorityQueue <> ();

        // insert values in the queue
        prq.add(6);
        prq.add(9);
        prq.add(5);
        prq.add(64);
        prq.add(6);

        //print values
        while (!prq.isEmpty()) {
            System.out.print(prq.poll()+" ");
        }
    }

}

For more information, please visit:

  • 8
    It's more convenient to use Collections.reverseOrder() as an argument to PriorityQueue in MaxHeap class. – Michael Berdyshev Feb 27 '17 at 15:53
  • What do you mean by more convenient? Would you please explain more? – Vahid Mar 2 '17 at 14:49
  • I think that reverseOrder method is more clear to read and understand what it does comparing to (x,y) -> y-x – Michael Berdyshev Mar 2 '17 at 21:56
  • Michael, the way that I did it, is the suggested way by Oracle. Oracle suggested using Comparator. Please look at this link: docs.oracle.com/javase/8/docs/api/java/util/PriorityQueue.html – Vahid Mar 3 '17 at 3:11
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    In the Lambda Expression, the comparison-by-subtraction trick could be easily broken due to integer overflow. Plain comparison is suggested: (x, y) -> x < y ? -1 : x == y ? 0 : 1 – Ruifeng Ma Apr 22 '18 at 10:07
2

How about com.aliasi.util.MinMaxHeap? This is part of LingPipe; unfortunately, the licensing may be a problem.

See this related paper.

Doesn't implement decreaseKey or increaseKey, though.

0

The java.util.TreeSet class.

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