41

I want to toggle between two values in Python, that is, between 0 and 1.

For example, when I run a function the first time, it yields the number 0. Next time, it yields 1. Third time it's back to zero, and so on.

Sorry if this doesn't make sense, but does anyone know a way to do this?

14 Answers 14

62

Use itertools.cycle():

from itertools import cycle
myIterator = cycle(range(2))

myIterator.next()   # or next(myIterator) which works in Python 3.x. Yields 0
myIterator.next()   # or next(myIterator) which works in Python 3.x. Yields 1
# etc.

Note that if you need a more complicated cycle than [0, 1], this solution becomes much more attractive than the other ones posted here...

from itertools import cycle
mySmallSquareIterator = cycle(i*i for i in range(10))
# Will yield 0, 1, 4, 9, 16, 25, 36, 49, 64, 81, 0, 1, 4, ...
6
  • 2
    Why not simply use itertools.cycle(range(2)) directly?
    – DSM
    Jun 11, 2012 at 20:23
  • 6
    No, what I mean is that myIterator = itertools.cycle(range(2)) works by itself. You don't need myFuncGenerator.
    – DSM
    Jun 11, 2012 at 20:26
  • ...True. I guess I wanted to illustrate some other concepts. Will edit shortly. Jun 11, 2012 at 20:26
  • you should demonstrate a larger range, or a 'string', then cycle really starts looking good..
    – fraxel
    Jun 11, 2012 at 20:28
  • 4
    You should use next(x) instead of x.next() in Python 2.6 or above – with this change, the code in this answer will also work in Python 3.x. Jun 12, 2012 at 11:05
49

You can accomplish that with a generator like this:

>>> def alternate():
...   while True:
...     yield 0
...     yield 1
...
>>>
>>> alternator = alternate()
>>>
>>> alternator.next()
0
>>> alternator.next()
1
>>> alternator.next()
0
5
  • This is far more generalizable than the other answers (not limited to 2 values, to 0 and 1, to consecutive values...).
    – octern
    Jun 11, 2012 at 20:25
  • 6
    itertools.cycle() works with any iterable of known values. I don't see how either the itertools solution or this one can have its generator switch values at runtime, but I'm sure such a thing is not difficult. Jun 11, 2012 at 20:28
  • This looks like excactly what I was looking for, will try it out. Thanks!
    – Yngve
    Jun 11, 2012 at 21:11
  • Conceptually easier to build a boolean toggler with True, False and next()
    – auro
    Jul 20, 2016 at 23:51
  • I just love Python
    – Novorodnas
    Feb 18, 2022 at 9:35
21

You can use the mod (%) operator.

count = 0  # initialize count once

then

count = (count + 1) % 2

will toggle the value of count between 0 and 1 each time this statement is executed. The advantage of this approach is that you can cycle through a sequence of values (if needed) from 0 - (n-1) where n is the value you use with your % operator. And this technique does not depend on any Python specific features/libraries.

e.g.

count = 0

for i in range(5):
    count = (count + 1) % 2
    print(count)

gives:

1
0
1
0
1
2
  • xor is more efficient and functionally the same. Jun 11, 2012 at 20:23
  • There's no reason to have both the i and count variables.
    – martineau
    Mar 10, 2022 at 16:27
20

You may find it useful to create a function alias like so:

import itertools
myfunc = itertools.cycle([0,1]).next

then

myfunc()    # -> returns 0
myfunc()    # -> returns 1
myfunc()    # -> returns 0
myfunc()    # -> returns 1
1
  • +1 for the function alias idea. It's like the generator solution (most popular at time of writing) but without having to write out a function definition! Jun 11, 2012 at 21:01
9

In python, True and False are integers (1 and 0 respectively). You could use a boolean (True or False) and the not operator:

var = not var

Of course, if you want to iterate between other numbers than 0 and 1, this trick becomes a little more difficult.

To pack this into an admittedly ugly function:

def alternate():
    alternate.x=not alternate.x
    return alternate.x

alternate.x=True  #The first call to alternate will return False (0)

mylist=[5,3]
print(mylist[alternate()])  #5
print(mylist[alternate()])  #3
print(mylist[alternate()])  #5
3
  • 7
    Overly complicated... highly suggest looking into itertools. Jun 11, 2012 at 20:34
  • @PlatinumAzure : Itertools is a better option. (in fact, I upvoted your solution). The above is only to demonstrate a neat trick which can be useful in some circumstances -- the packing into a function part is not recommended. (functions probably shouldn't save state, that's what classes are for...). But the fact that True and False can be used to index arrays as 0 and 1 is neat (I think)
    – mgilson
    Jun 11, 2012 at 20:39
  • 1
    If you really want to save state in a function, you can use alternate.x from within it (instead of using the default trick).. which I have to admit I've used once or twice. (But only once or twice.)
    – DSM
    Jun 11, 2012 at 20:44
8
from itertools import cycle

alternator = cycle((0,1))
next(alternator) # yields 0
next(alternator) # yields 1
next(alternator) # yields 0
next(alternator) # yields 1
#... forever
0
7
var = 1
var = 1 - var

That's the official tricky way of doing it ;)

3
  • That will go from 1 to 0 to 0 to 0 to... (-1) Jun 11, 2012 at 20:23
  • 3
    @PlatinumAzure No, it won't. Perhaps you read it as var = var - 1? Might not be very pythonic, but is better than using %. It also works for toggling between any two numeric values. For example, var = 3 - var to toggle between 1 and 2. Dec 6, 2019 at 15:54
  • Correct... I must have misread it. I don't see any edit history to suggest the answer changed, either. I still downvoted because I don't think it's intuitive/maintainable. Dec 7, 2019 at 23:49
6

Using xor works, and is a good visual way to toggle between two values.

count = 1
count = count ^ 1 # count is now 0
count = count ^ 1 # count is now 1
6

To toggle variable x between two arbitrary (integer) values, e.g. a and b, use:

    # start with either x == a or x == b
    x = (a + b) - x

    # case x == a:
    # x = (a + b) - a  ==> x becomes b

    # case x == b:
    # x = (a + b) - b  ==> x becomes a

Example:

Toggle between 3 and 5

    x = 3
    x = 8 - x  (now x == 5)
    x = 8 - x  (now x == 3)
    x = 8 - x  (now x == 5)

This works even with strings (sort of).

    YesNo = 'YesNo'
    answer = 'Yes'
    answer = YesNo.replace(answer,'')  (now answer == 'No')
    answer = YesNo.replace(answer,'')  (now answer == 'Yes')
    answer = YesNo.replace(answer,'')  (now answer == 'No')
5

Using the tuple subscript trick:

value = (1, 0)[value]
2
  • 1
    That's a neat trick, but it seems like using this to alternate among any values other than 0 and 1 would get ugly fast.
    – octern
    Jun 11, 2012 at 20:24
  • 2
    True. This trick is mainly used as an alternative to the ternary operator, but happens to work just as well for the OP's specific case. Just thought I'd throw something different into the mix ;)
    – Shawn Chin
    Jun 11, 2012 at 20:28
2

Using tuple subscripts is one good way to toggle between two values:

toggle_val = 1

toggle_val = (1,0)[toggle_val]

If you wrapped a function around this, you would have a nice alternating switch.

2

If a variable is previously defined and you want it to toggle between two values, you may use the
a if b else c form:

variable = 'value1'
variable = 'value2' if variable=='value1' else 'value1'

In addition, it works on Python 2.5+ and 3.x

See Expressions in the Python 3 documentation.

1

Simple and general solution without using any built-in. Just keep the track of current element and print/return the other one then change the current element status.

a, b = map(int, raw_input("Enter both number: ").split())
flag = input("Enter the first value: ")
length = input("Enter Number of iterations: ")
for i in range(length):
    print flag
    if flag == a:
        flag = b;     
    else:
        flag = a

Input:
3 8
3
5
Output:
3
8
3
8
3

Means numbers to be toggled are 3 and 8 Second input, is the first value by which you want to start the sequence And last input indicates the number of times you want to generate

-1

One cool way you can do in any language:

variable = 0
variable = abs(variable - 1)    // 1
variable = abs(variable - 1)    // 0

1
  • 2
    variable = 1 - variable is even cooler ;)
    – AcK
    Jul 24, 2021 at 0:54

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