54

I was wondering how to write code that would detect the mouse clicking on a sprite. For example:

if #Function that checks for mouse clicked on Sprite:
    print ("You have opened a chest!")
1
  • As far as I can tell none of the answers detects a mouse click in a fully reliable way. A mouse click includes a mouse down motion and mouse up motion. I don't see a way to detect that reliably with pygame, because a user could mouse down inside a window, move the mouse out of the window, mouse up where pygame doesn't detect mouse up, mouse down again, move the mouse back into the window, and mouse up. If a user does all that, then they probably don't expect a mouse click to be detected. Although maybe we can detect the mouse leaving the window or the mouse moving far away from the mouse down. Commented Apr 17 at 19:10

4 Answers 4

68

I assume your game has a main loop, and all your sprites are in a list called sprites.

In your main loop, get all events, and check for the MOUSEBUTTONDOWN or MOUSEBUTTONUP event.

while ... # your main loop
  # get all events
  ev = pygame.event.get()

  # proceed events
  for event in ev:

    # handle MOUSEBUTTONUP
    if event.type == pygame.MOUSEBUTTONUP:
      pos = pygame.mouse.get_pos()

      # get a list of all sprites that are under the mouse cursor
      clicked_sprites = [s for s in sprites if s.rect.collidepoint(pos)]
      # do something with the clicked sprites...

So basically you have to check for a click on a sprite yourself every iteration of the mainloop. You'll want to use mouse.get_pos() and rect.collidepoint().

Pygame does not offer event driven programming, as e.g. cocos2d does.

Another way would be to check the position of the mouse cursor and the state of the pressed buttons, but this approach has some issues.

if pygame.mouse.get_pressed()[0] and mysprite.rect.collidepoint(pygame.mouse.get_pos()):
  print ("You have opened a chest!")

You'll have to introduce some kind of flag if you handled this case, since otherwise this code will print "You have opened a chest!" every iteration of the main loop.

handled = False

while ... // your loop

  if pygame.mouse.get_pressed()[0] and mysprite.rect.collidepoint(pygame.mouse.get_pos()) and not handled:
    print ("You have opened a chest!")
    handled = pygame.mouse.get_pressed()[0]

Of course you can subclass Sprite and add a method called is_clicked like this:

class MySprite(Sprite):
  ...

  def is_clicked(self):
    return pygame.mouse.get_pressed()[0] and self.rect.collidepoint(pygame.mouse.get_pos())

So, it's better to use the first approach IMHO.

2
  • 8
    Also note that the position of the mouse is also available in the event itself under event.pos
    – Nicu Surdu
    Commented Mar 22, 2014 at 19:29
  • 1
    I would encourage getting the mouse's position from event.pos rather than mouse.get_pos. Some operating systems do allow the mouse to move slightly between the actual click and the event being handled to the application. Also the click might not have come from a mouse (in unit tests for example) Commented Aug 9, 2022 at 15:51
22

The MOUSEBUTTONDOWN event occurs once when you click the mouse button and the MOUSEBUTTONUP event occurs once when the mouse button is released. The pygame.event.Event() object has two attributes that provide information about the mouse event. pos is a tuple that stores the position that was clicked. button stores the button that was clicked. Each mouse button is associated a value. For instance the value of the attributes is 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 for the left mouse button, middle mouse button, right mouse button, mouse wheel up respectively mouse wheel down. When multiple keys are pressed, multiple mouse button events occur. Further explanations can be found in the documentation of the module pygame.event.

Use the rect attribute of the pygame.sprite.Sprite object and the collidepoint method to see if the Sprite was clicked. Pass the list of events to the update method of the pygame.sprite.Group so that you can process the events in the Sprite class:

class SpriteObject(pygame.sprite.Sprite):
    # [...]

    def update(self, event_list):

        for event in event_list:
            if event.type == pygame.MOUSEBUTTONDOWN:
                if self.rect.collidepoint(event.pos):
                    # [...]

my_sprite = SpriteObject()
group = pygame.sprite.Group(my_sprite)

# [...]

run = True
while run:
    event_list = pygame.event.get()
    for event in event_list:
        if event.type == pygame.QUIT:
            run = False 

    group.update(event_list)

    # [...]

Minimal example: repl.it/@Rabbid76/PyGame-MouseClick

import pygame

class SpriteObject(pygame.sprite.Sprite):
    def __init__(self, x, y, color):
        super().__init__() 
        self.original_image = pygame.Surface((50, 50), pygame.SRCALPHA)
        pygame.draw.circle(self.original_image, color, (25, 25), 25)
        self.click_image = pygame.Surface((50, 50), pygame.SRCALPHA)
        pygame.draw.circle(self.click_image, color, (25, 25), 25)
        pygame.draw.circle(self.click_image, (255, 255, 255), (25, 25), 25, 4)
        self.image = self.original_image 
        self.rect = self.image.get_rect(center = (x, y))
        self.clicked = False

    def update(self, event_list):
        for event in event_list:
            if event.type == pygame.MOUSEBUTTONDOWN:
                if self.rect.collidepoint(event.pos):
                    self.clicked = not self.clicked

        self.image = self.click_image if self.clicked else self.original_image

pygame.init()
window = pygame.display.set_mode((300, 300))
clock = pygame.time.Clock()

sprite_object = SpriteObject(*window.get_rect().center, (128, 128, 0))
group = pygame.sprite.Group([
    SpriteObject(window.get_width() // 3, window.get_height() // 3, (128, 0, 0)),
    SpriteObject(window.get_width() * 2 // 3, window.get_height() // 3, (0, 128, 0)),
    SpriteObject(window.get_width() // 3, window.get_height() * 2 // 3, (0, 0, 128)),
    SpriteObject(window.get_width() * 2// 3, window.get_height() * 2 // 3, (128, 128, 0)),
])

run = True
while run:
    clock.tick(60)
    event_list = pygame.event.get()
    for event in event_list:
        if event.type == pygame.QUIT:
            run = False 

    group.update(event_list)

    window.fill(0)
    group.draw(window)
    pygame.display.flip()

pygame.quit()
exit()

See further Creating multiple sprites with different update()'s from the same sprite class in Pygame


The current position of the mouse can be determined via pygame.mouse.get_pos(). The return value is a tuple that represents the x and y coordinates of the mouse cursor. pygame.mouse.get_pressed() returns a list of Boolean values ​​that represent the state (True or False) of all mouse buttons. The state of a button is True as long as a button is held down. When multiple buttons are pressed, multiple items in the list are True. The 1st, 2nd and 3rd elements in the list represent the left, middle and right mouse buttons.

Detect evaluate the mouse states in the Update method of the pygame.sprite.Sprite object:

class SpriteObject(pygame.sprite.Sprite):
    # [...]

    def update(self, event_list):

        mouse_pos = pygame.mouse.get_pos()
        mouse_buttons = pygame.mouse.get_pressed()

        if  self.rect.collidepoint(mouse_pos) and any(mouse_buttons):
            # [...]

my_sprite = SpriteObject()
group = pygame.sprite.Group(my_sprite)

# [...]

run = True
while run:
    for event in pygame.event.get():
        if event.type == pygame.QUIT:
            run = False

    group.update(event_list)

    # [...]

Minimal example: repl.it/@Rabbid76/PyGame-MouseHover

import pygame

class SpriteObject(pygame.sprite.Sprite):
    def __init__(self, x, y, color):
        super().__init__() 
        self.original_image = pygame.Surface((50, 50), pygame.SRCALPHA)
        pygame.draw.circle(self.original_image, color, (25, 25), 25)
        self.hover_image = pygame.Surface((50, 50), pygame.SRCALPHA)
        pygame.draw.circle(self.hover_image, color, (25, 25), 25)
        pygame.draw.circle(self.hover_image, (255, 255, 255), (25, 25), 25, 4)
        self.image = self.original_image 
        self.rect = self.image.get_rect(center = (x, y))
        self.hover = False

    def update(self):
        mouse_pos = pygame.mouse.get_pos()
        mouse_buttons = pygame.mouse.get_pressed()

        #self.hover = self.rect.collidepoint(mouse_pos)
        self.hover = self.rect.collidepoint(mouse_pos) and any(mouse_buttons)

        self.image = self.hover_image if self.hover else self.original_image

pygame.init()
window = pygame.display.set_mode((300, 300))
clock = pygame.time.Clock()

sprite_object = SpriteObject(*window.get_rect().center, (128, 128, 0))
group = pygame.sprite.Group([
    SpriteObject(window.get_width() // 3, window.get_height() // 3, (128, 0, 0)),
    SpriteObject(window.get_width() * 2 // 3, window.get_height() // 3, (0, 128, 0)),
    SpriteObject(window.get_width() // 3, window.get_height() * 2 // 3, (0, 0, 128)),
    SpriteObject(window.get_width() * 2// 3, window.get_height() * 2 // 3, (128, 128, 0)),
])

run = True
while run:
    clock.tick(60)
    for event in pygame.event.get():
        if event.type == pygame.QUIT:
            run = False 

    group.update()

    window.fill(0)
    group.draw(window)
    pygame.display.flip()

pygame.quit()
exit()
10

The pygame documentation for mouse events is here.

You can either use the pygame.mouse.get_pressed method in collaboration with the pygame.mouse.get_pos (if needed).

Remember to use the mouse click event via a main event loop. The reason why the event loop is better is due to "short clicks". You may not notice these on normal machines, but computers that use tap-clicks on trackpads have excessively small click periods. Using the mouse events will prevent this.

EDIT: To perform pixel perfect collisions use pygame.sprite.collide_rect() found on their docs for sprites.

2
  • How would I apply that to clicking on a sprite though?
    – user1406948
    Commented Jun 12, 2012 at 3:39
  • @EliasBenevedes I edited my answer with pixel perfect collisions. Commented Jun 12, 2012 at 3:56
6

I was looking for the same answer to this question and after much head scratching this is the answer I came up with:

# Python 3.4.3 with Pygame
from sys import exit
import pygame
pygame.init()

WIDTH = HEIGHT = 300
window = pygame.display.set_mode((WIDTH, HEIGHT))
pygame.display.set_caption('Crash!')

# Draw Once
rectangle = pygame.draw.rect(window, (255, 0, 0), (100, 100, 100, 100))
pygame.display.update()

# Main Loop
while True:
    # Mouse position and button clicking
    pos = pygame.mouse.get_pos()
    pressed1 = pygame.mouse.get_pressed()[0]

    # Check if rectangle collided with pos and if the left mouse button was pressed
    if rectangle.collidepoint(pos) and pressed1:
        print("You have opened a chest!")

    # Quit pygame
    for event in pygame.event.get():
        if event.type == pygame.QUIT:
            pygame.quit()
            exit()