18

Consider a Database interaction module written in PHP that contains classes for interacting with the database. I have not started coding the class so I won't be able to give code snippets.

There will be one class per database table as explained below.

User - A class for interacting with the user table. The class contains functions such as createUser, updateUser, etc.

Locations - A class for interacting with the locations table. The class contains functions such as searchLocation, createLocation, updateLocation, etc.

In addition, I am thinking of creating another class as follows: -

DatabaseHelper : A class that will have a member that represents the connection to the database. This class will contain the lower level methods for executing SQL queries such as executeQuery(query,parameters), executeUpdate(query,parameters) and so on.

At this point, I have two options to use the DatabaseHelper class in other classes : -

  1. The User and Locations class will extend the DatabaseHelper class so that they can use the inherited executeQuery and executeUpdate methods in DatabaseHelper. In this case, DatabaseHelper will ensure that there is only one instance of the connection to the database at any given time.
  2. The DatabaseHelper class will be injected in the User and Locations class through a Container class that will make User and Location instances. In this case, the Container will make sure that there is only one instance of DatabaseHelper in the application at any given time.

These are the two approaches that quickly come to my mind. I want to know which approach to go with. It is possible that both these approaches are not good enough, in which case, I want to know any other approach that I can go with to implement the database interaction module.

Edit:

Note that the Container class will contain a static member of type DatabaseHelper. It will contain a private static getDatabaseHelper() function that will return an existing DatabaseHelper instance or create a new DatabaseHelper instance if one does not exists in which case, it will populate the connection object in DatabaseHelper. The Container will also contain static methods called makeUser and makeLocation that will inject the DatabaseHelper into User and Locations respectively.

After reading a few answers, I realize that the initial question has almost been answered. But there is still a doubt that needs to be clarified before I can accept the final answer which is as follows.

What to do when I have multiple databases to connect to rather than a single database. How does the DatabaseHelper class incorporate this and how does the container inject appropriate database dependencies in the User and Location objects?

  • 1
    inheritance means a is-a relationship between the classes. The User is not a DatabaseHelper. Hence inheritance should not be used. So what you have is the composition option: Either use the DatabaseHelper as a member variable which you create inside the constructor or use constructor injection. – jgauffin Jun 12 '12 at 12:47
  • Can the downvoter please leave a comment and tell me what is wrong with my question? I have a strong feeling this is a hate vote. – CKing May 10 '15 at 7:28
18

Lets answer your questions from top to bottom, and see what I can add to what you say.

There will be one class per database table as explained below.

User - A class for interacting with the user table. The class contains functions such as createUser, updateUser, etc.

Locations - A class for interacting with the locations table. The class contains functions >such as searchLocation, createLocation, updateLocation, etc.

Essentially you have to choices here. The method you described is called the active record pattern. The object itself knows how and where it is stored. For simple objects that interact with a database to create / read / update / delete, this pattern is really usefull.

If the database operations become more extensive and less simple to understand, it is often a good choice to go with a data mapper (eg. this implementation). This is a second object that handles all the database interactions, while the object itself (eg. User or Location) only handles operations that are specific to that object (eg. login or goToLocation). If you ever want to chance the storage of your objects, you will only have to create a new data mapper. Your object won't even know that something changed in the implementation. This enforces encapsulation and seperation of concerns.

There are other options, but these two are the most used ways to implement database interactions.

In addition, I am thinking of creating another class as follows: -

DatabaseHelper : A class that will have a static member that represents the connection to the database. This class will contain the lower level methods for executing SQL queries such as executeQuery(query,parameters), executeUpdate(query,parameters) and so on.

What you are describing here sounds like a singleton. Normally this isn't really a good design choice. Are you really, really certain that there will never be a second database? Probably not, so you should not confine yourself to an implementation that only allowes for one database connection. Instead of making a DatabaseHelper with static members, you can better create a Database object with some methods that allow you to connect, disconnect, execute a query, etc. This way you can reuse it if you ever need a second connection.

At this point, I have two options to use the DatabaseHelper class in other classes : -

  1. The User and Locations class will extend the DatabaseHelper class so that they can use the inherited executeQuery and executeUpdate methods in DatabaseHelper. In this case, DatabaseHelper will ensure that there is only one instance of the connection to the database at any given time.
  2. The DatabaseHelper class will be injected in the User and Locations class through a Container class that will make User and Location instances. In this case, the Container will make sure that there is only one instance of DatabaseHelper in the application at any given time.

These are the two approaches that quickly come to my mind. I want to know which approach to go with. It is possible that both these approaches are not good enough, in which case, I want to know any other approach that I can go with to implement the database interaction module.

The first option isn't really viable. If you read the description of inheritance, you will see that inheritance is normally used to create a subtype of an existing object. An User is not a subtype of a DatabaseHelper, nor is a location. A MysqlDatabase would be a subtype of a Database, or a Admin would be a subtype of an User. I would advise against this option, as it isn't following the best practices of object oriented programming.

The second option is better. If you choose to use the active record method, you should indeed inject the Database into the User and Location objects. This should of course be done by some third object that handles all these kind of interactions. You will probably want to take a look at dependency injection and inversion of control.

Otherwise, if you choose the data mapper method, you should inject the Database into the data mapper. This way it is still possible to use several databases, while seperating all your concerns.

For more information about the active record pattern and the data mapper pattern, I would advise you to get the Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture book of Martin Fowler. It is full of these kind of patterns and much, much more!

I hope this helps (and sorry if there are some really bad English sentences in there, I'm not a native speaker!).

== EDIT ==

Using the active record pattern of data mapper pattern also helps in testing your code (like Aurel said). If you seperate all peaces of code to do just one thing, it will be easier to check that it is really doing this one thing. By using PHPUnit (or some other testing framework) to check that your code is properly working, you can be pretty sure that no bugs will be present in each of your code units. If you mix up the concerns (like when you choose option 1 of your choices), this will be a whole lot harder. Things get pretty mixed up, and you will soon get a big bunch of spaghetti code.

== EDIT2 ==

An example of the active record pattern (that is pretty lazy, and not really active):

class Controller {
    public function main() {
        $database = new Database('host', 'username', 'password');
        $database->selectDatabase('database');

        $user = new User($database);
        $user->name = 'Test';

        $user->insert();

        $otherUser = new User($database, 5);
        $otherUser->delete();
    }
}

class Database {
    protected $connection = null;

    public function __construct($host, $username, $password) {
        // Connect to database and set $this->connection
    }

    public function selectDatabase($database) {
        // Set the database on the current connection
    }

    public function execute($query) {
        // Execute the given query
    }
}

class User {
    protected $database = null;

    protected $id = 0;
    protected $name = '';

    // Add database on creation and get the user with the given id
    public function __construct($database, $id = 0) {
        $this->database = $database;

        if ($id != 0) {
            $this->load($id);
        }
    }

    // Get the user with the given ID
    public function load($id) {
        $sql = 'SELECT * FROM users WHERE id = ' . $this->database->escape($id);
        $result = $this->database->execute($sql);

        $this->id = $result['id'];
        $this->name = $result['name'];
    }

    // Insert this user into the database
    public function insert() {
        $sql = 'INSERT INTO users (name) VALUES ("' . $this->database->escape($this->name) . '")';
        $this->database->execute($sql);
    }

    // Update this user
    public function update() {
        $sql = 'UPDATE users SET name = "' . $this->database->escape($this->name) . '" WHERE id = ' . $this->database->escape($this->id);
        $this->database->execute($sql);
    }

    // Delete this user
    public function delete() {
        $sql = 'DELETE FROM users WHERE id = ' . $this->database->escape($this->id);
        $this->database->execute($sql);
    }

    // Other method of this user
    public function login() {}
    public function logout() {}
}

And an example of the data mapper pattern:

class Controller {
    public function main() {
        $database = new Database('host', 'username', 'password');
        $database->selectDatabase('database');

        $userMapper = new UserMapper($database);

        $user = $userMapper->get(0);
        $user->name = 'Test';
        $userMapper->insert($user);

        $otherUser = UserMapper(5);
        $userMapper->delete($otherUser);
    }
}

class Database {
    protected $connection = null;

    public function __construct($host, $username, $password) {
        // Connect to database and set $this->connection
    }

    public function selectDatabase($database) {
        // Set the database on the current connection
    }

    public function execute($query) {
        // Execute the given query
    }
}

class UserMapper {
    protected $database = null;

    // Add database on creation
    public function __construct($database) {
        $this->database = $database;
    }

    // Get the user with the given ID
    public function get($id) {
        $user = new User();

        if ($id != 0) {
            $sql = 'SELECT * FROM users WHERE id = ' . $this->database->escape($id);
            $result = $this->database->execute($sql);

            $user->id = $result['id'];
            $user->name = $result['name'];
        }

        return $user;
    }

    // Insert the given user
    public function insert($user) {
        $sql = 'INSERT INTO users (name) VALUES ("' . $this->database->escape($user->name) . '")';
        $this->database->execute($sql);
    }

    // Update the given user
    public function update($user) {
        $sql = 'UPDATE users SET name = "' . $this->database->escape($user->name) . '" WHERE id = ' . $this->database->escape($user->id);
        $this->database->execute($sql);
    }

    // Delete the given user
    public function delete($user) {
        $sql = 'DELETE FROM users WHERE id = ' . $this->database->escape($user->id);
        $this->database->execute($sql);
    }
}

class User {
    public $id = 0;
    public $name = '';

    // Other method of this user
    public function login() {}
    public function logout() {}
}

== EDIT 3: after edit by bot ==

Note that the Container class will contain a static member of type DatabaseHelper. It will contain a private static getDatabaseHelper() function that will return an existing DatabaseHelper instance or create a new DatabaseHelper instance if one does not exists in which case, it will populate the connection object in DatabaseHelper. The Container will also contain static methods called makeUser and makeLocation that will inject the DatabaseHelper into User and Locations respectively.

After reading a few answers, I realize that the initial question has almost been answered. But there is still a doubt that needs to be clarified before I can accept the final answer which is as follows.

What to do when I have multiple databases to connect to rather than a single database. How does the DatabaseHelper class incorporate this and how does the container inject appropriate database dependencies in the User and Location objects?

I think there is no need for any static property, nor does the Container need those makeUser of makeLocation methods. Lets assume that you have some entry point of your application, in which you create a class that will control all flow in your application. You seem to call it a container, I prefer to call it a controller. After all, it controls what happens in your application.

$controller = new Controller();

The controller will have to know what database it has to load, and if there is one single database or multiple ones. For example, one database contains the user data, anonther database contains the location data. If the active record User from above and a similar Location class are given, then the controller might look as follows:

class Controller {
    protected $databases = array();

    public function __construct() {
        $this->database['first_db'] = new Database('first_host', 'first_username', 'first_password');
        $this->database['first_db']->selectDatabase('first_database');

        $this->database['second_db'] = new Database('second_host', 'second_username', 'second_password');
        $this->database['second_db']->selectDatabase('second_database');
    }

    public function showUserAndLocation() {
        $user = new User($this->databases['first_database'], 3);
        $location = $user->getLocation($this->databases['second_database']);

        echo 'User ' . $user->name . ' is at location ' . $location->name;
    }

    public function showLocation() {
        $location = new Location($this->database['second_database'], 5);

        echo 'The location ' . $location->name . ' is ' . $location->description;
    }
}

Probably it would be good to move all the echo's to a View class or something. If you have multiple controller classes, it might pay off to have a different entrypoint that creates all databases and pushes them in the controller. You could for example call this a front controller or an entry controller.

Does this answer you open questions?

  • Nice answer though I disagree that the OP describes an ActiveRecord. Active Record represents a single Row and adds business logic. Classes interacting with a Table as a whole are Table Data Gateways. – Gordon Jun 12 '12 at 9:09
  • @Gordon Please take a look at the PEAA book or at the wiki page for active record. An object that has CRUD operations in it, pretty much describes the active record pattern. – Thanaton Jun 12 '12 at 9:17
  • Thank you for spending so much time on the detailed explanation. You are right when you say that I should not use a static connection object. I'll change that. But note that DatabaseHelper is not a singleton. It will have a non-static connection object to connect to a single database. The Container will have a getDatabaseHelper() method that will return an existing instance of DatabaseHelper with the connection object populated everytime it is called. This instance will be injected in the User and Location classes by the Container. – CKing Jun 12 '12 at 10:15
  • Also, as of now, the User and Location classes do not contain any complex business logic so will it be okay if I delay the use of a separate data mapper till it is actually required? I am still very confused about how I am going to inject database dependency into User and Location even if I update my DatabaseHelper to provide methods to connect to any database rather than holding a single connection object to a single database! – CKing Jun 12 '12 at 10:19
  • @bot See the second edit on my main post. Ofcourse you can use the active record pattern, especially if the objects aren't very complicated. To inject the database dependency into User and Location, you will have to have a current database connection open somewhere. At the start of your script (bootstrap?) you can initiate the connection, and pass it on as a parameter. Or you can use a (singleton) registry, although this is not really accepted as general best practice. One you create a new User, you can then inject it in the constructor. – Thanaton Jun 12 '12 at 11:12
8

I would go with the dependancy injection, for the following reason: if at some point you want to write tests for your applications, it will allow you to replace the DatabaseHelper instance by a stub class, implementing the same interface but that do not really access a database. This will make it really easier to test your model functionalities.

By the way, for this to be really useful, your other classes (User, Locations) should depend on a DatabaseHelperInterface rather than directly on DatabaseHelper. (This is required to be able to switch implementations)

  • +1 I second you for the second option eg dependency injection for added benefits while keeping other classes alone and intact and easily extendable. – Sarfraz Jun 12 '12 at 8:27
  • Thank you for the Interface reference. Just to confirm, I will create an interface called DatabaseHelperInterface that will contain the signatures for the executeQuery,executeUpdate methods. I will inject DatabaseHlperInterface in User and Locations rather than injecting DatabaseHelper directly right? One more question, is it a good idea to create DatabaseHelper in the first place? – CKing Jun 12 '12 at 8:27
  • 1
    Yes that's it :) And yes you need some way to abstract the actual db queries and avoid writing them in several places. Your DatabaseHelper is a good solution for this. – Aurel Jun 12 '12 at 8:30
  • Note that database helper will not contain any queries. It will only execute the queries. The. User and Locations class will contain queries soecific to the corresponding DB tables! – CKing Jun 12 '12 at 19:19
5

The question of Dependency Injection vs. Inheritance, at least in your specific example comes down to the following: "is a" or "has a".

Is class foo a type of class bar? Is it a bar? If so, maybe inheritance is the way to go.

Does class foo use an object of class bar? You're now in dependency injection territory.

In your case, your data access objects (in my code approach these are UserDAO and LocationDAO) are NOT types of database helpers. You would not use a UserDAO, for instance, to provide database access to another DAO class. Instead, you USE the features of a database helper in your DAO classes. Now, this doesn't mean that technically you could not achieve what you want to do by extending the database helper classes. But I think it would be a bad design, and would cause trouble down the road as your design evolves.

Another way to think about it is, is ALL of your data going to come from the database? What if, somewhere down the road, you want to pull some location data from, say, an RSS feed. You have your LocationDAO essentially defining your interface -- your "contract", so to speak -- as to how the rest of your application obtains location data. But if you had extended DatabaseHelper to implement your LocationDAO, you'd now be stuck. There'd be no way to have your LocationDAO use a different data source. If, however, DatabaseHelper and your RSSHelper both had a common interface, you could plug the RSSHelper right into your DAO and LocationDAO doesn't even have to change at all. *

If you had made LocationDAO a type of DatabaseHandler, changing the data source would require changing the type of LocationDAO. This means that not only does LocationDAO have to change, but all your code that uses LocationDAO has to change. If you had injected a datasource into your DAO classes from the start, then the LocationDAO interface would remain the same, regardless of the datasource.

(* Just a theoretical example. There'd be a lot more work to get a DatabaseHelper and RSSHelper to have a similar interface.)

  • +1 for suggesting to use a common interface for the data sources. – CKing Jun 14 '12 at 6:33
3

What you are describing with your User and Location classes is called a Table Data Gateway:

An object that acts as a Gateway to a database table. One instance handles all the rows in the table.

In general, you want to favor Composition over Inheritance and programm towards an interface. While it may seem like more effort to assemble your objects, doing it will benefit maintenance and the ability to change the program in the long run (and we all know change is the only ever constant in a project).

The most obvious benefit of using Dependency Injection here is when you want to unit test the Gateways. You cannot easily mock away the connection to the database when using inheritance. This means you will always have to have a database connection for these tests. Using Depedency Injection allows you to mock that connection and just test the Gateways interact correctly with the Database Helper.

  • A good take-away from this answer is "composition over inheritance." Dependency Injection is but one way to accomplish composition, so comparing it to the concept of inheritance is comparing something rather concrete to a conceptual thing. – Marvo Jun 13 '12 at 18:56
  • Thats right. It all boils down to composition vs inheritance. I will rephrase the question! – CKing Jun 14 '12 at 6:35
  • @bot we already have a number of good Q&A for when to use Composition and when to use Inheritance btw – Gordon Jun 14 '12 at 6:43
  • @Gordon. Should I rephrase this question to be more specific to a database interaction module then? :( – CKing Jun 14 '12 at 6:45
  • @bot nah, given that you already accepted an answer and found a solution, I'd keep the question as is. – Gordon Jun 14 '12 at 6:47
3

Even though the other answers here are very good, I wanted to throw in some other thoughts from my experiences using CakePHP (an MVC framework). Basically, I will just show you a leaf or two out of their API; mainly because - to me - it seems well defined and thought out (probably because I use it daily).

class DATABASE_CONFIG { // define various database connection details here (default/test/externalapi/etc) }

// Data access layer
class DataSource extends Object { // base for all places where data comes from (DB/CSV/SOAP/etc) }
// - Database
class DboSource extends DataSource { // base for all DB-specific datasources (find/count/query/etc) }
class Mysql extends DboSource { // MySQL DB-specific datasource }
// - Web service
class SoapSource extends DataSource { // web services, etc don't extend DboSource }
class AcmeApi extends SoapSource { // some non-standard SOAP API to wrestle with, etc }

// Business logic layer
class Model extends Object { // inject a datasource (definitions are in DATABASE_CONFIG) }
// - Your models
class User extends Model { // createUser, updateUser (can influence datasource injected above) }
class Location extends Model { // searchLocation, createLocation, updateLocation (same as above) }

// Flow control layer
class Controller extends Object { // web browser controls: render view, redirect, error404, etc }
// - Your controllers
class UsersController extends Controller { // inject the User model here, implement CRUD, this is where your URLs map to (eg. /users/view/123) }
class LocationsController extends Controller { // more CRUD, eg. $this->Location->search() }

// Presentation layer
class View extends Object { // load php template, insert data, wrap in design }
// - Non-HTML output
class XmlView extends View { // expose data as XML }
class JsonView extends View { // expose data as JSON }
2

Dependency Injection is preferred if you have different types of services, and one service want to use other.

Your classes User and Locations sounds more like DAO (DataAccessObject) layer, that interact with database, So for your given case you should be using In Inheritance. Inheritance can be done by extending class or implementing Interfaces

public interface DatabaseHelperInterface {
  public executeQuery(....);
}

public class DatabaseHelperImpl implemnets DatabaseHelperInterface {
  public executeQuery(....) {
     //some code
  }

public Class UserDaoInterface extends DatabaseHelperInterface {
   public createUser(....);
}

public Class UserDaoImpl extends DatabaseHelperImpl {
   public createUser(....) {
    executeQuery(create user query);
   }

In this way your database design and code will be separate.

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