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I'm designing a form with a horizontal scroll bar docked at the bottom. I wanted to add support for side-scrolling using mouse tilt buttons and found this solution which, after a bit of tinkering, seemed to do the trick – that is, while the form only had GDI graphics drawn on its surface.

However, since then I've added some controls to the form and found that when the mouse is over any of them the tilt operation only fires once-at-a-time instead of repeatedly as it does when the mouse is over any other part of the form.

To see what I mean (if you have a mouse with tilt buttons) dock a horizontal scrollbar onto the bottom of a form, add a few other controls and paste in this code:

Public Class Form1
    Const WM_MOUSEHWHEEL As Integer = &H20E

    Protected Overrides Sub WndProc(ByRef m As Message)
        MyBase.WndProc(m)
        If Me.IsDisposed OrElse m.HWnd <> Me.Handle Then Return 
        Select Case m.Msg
            Case WM_MOUSEHWHEEL
                With HScrollBar1
                    If CType(m.WParam, Integer) < 0 Then '______________ Left Scroll
                        If .Value > 0 Then .Value -= 1
                    Else '______________________________________________ Right Scroll
                        If .Value < (.Maximum - .LargeChange + 1) Then .Value += 1
                    End If
                End With
                m.Result = CType(1, IntPtr) 'Indicates the message has been handled
        End Select
    End Sub

    Private Sub HScrollBar1_ValueChanged(sender As Object, e As System.EventArgs) Handles HScrollBar1.ValueChanged
        Console.WriteLine(HScrollBar1.Value)
    End Sub
End Class

You'll see that side-scrolling repeats when the mouse is over a blank part of the form, but only "one-shots" when it's over a control.

I'm guessing the solution lies somewhere in the message's .Result value, but I'm at a loss as to what that should be. In fact I'm not even sure I'm returning a correct value anyway because the code in the original solution threw an exception to the DirectCast function so I swapped that for CType, which seemed to work okay. I've tried working it out using Spy++ but I can't see anything obvious.

Any ideas please?


UPDATE

I've noticed when I include 'Child' windows in Spy++ there are two (0x020E) messages and two return values, 1 then 0. I presume the message is being passed onto the control by the form. So I guess the question now is: can the message be prevented from being passed to the control? Or can the control's return value be intercepted and converted to 1?

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  • usually in a behavior like that the control is intercepting the mouse event and never reaching the form which holds and controls the scroll bar. In fact, I'm surprised even one event got to the form. You may need to hook into the system DLL's to accomplish this.... Jun 12, 2012 at 16:13
  • @SASS_Shooter I thought WndProc received all the messages intended for a form and its controls. I've been playing around with Spy++ a bit more and if I include 'Child' windows it's clear that the message is being passed onto the control which is returning 0. So the question is, can the message be prevented from being passed to the control or the controls return value intercepted and converted to 1?
    – Antagony
    Jun 12, 2012 at 23:07

1 Answer 1

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I've managed to contrive a workaround but I feel sure there must be a better method than this. What I've done is add a class for each type of control used on my form and inheriting from the control. Then I've added a WndProc procedure to each class so that 1 is always returned for WM_MOUSEHWHEEL messages processed by these controls. For example, this is the button class:

Public Class scButton
    Inherits Button
    Protected Overrides Sub WndProc(ByRef m As Message)
        MyBase.WndProc(m)
        If Me.IsDisposed OrElse m.HWnd <> Me.Handle Then Return
        If m.Msg = Win32Messages.WM_MOUSEHWHEEL Then m.Result = New IntPtr(1)
    End Sub
End Class

Then it was just a matter of changing the references in the form's designer code.

As I say, I'm sure there must be a better method than this. It would be painful if you had to do it for a large number of different control classes, but in my case I just needed it for a few basic controls.


I left this open for a few days in the hope that someone would suggest a better solution but nothing has been forthcoming so I'm going to accept my own answer.

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