40

Here is the current code in my application:

String[] ids = str.split("/");

When profiling the application, I noticed that a non negligeable time is spent for splitting the string.

I also learned that split actually takes a regular expression, which is useless for me here.

So my question is, what alternative can I use in order to optimize the string splitting? I've seen StringUtils.split but is it faster?

(I would've tried and tested myself but profiling my application takes a lot of time, so if someone already knows the answer that's some time saved)

10 Answers 10

40

String.split(String) won't create regexp if your pattern is only one character long. When splitting by single character, it will use specialized code which is pretty efficient. StringTokenizer is not much faster in this particular case.

This was introduced in OpenJDK7/OracleJDK7. Here's a bug report and a commit. I've made a simple benchmark here.


$ java -version
java version "1.8.0_20"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.8.0_20-b26)
Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 25.20-b23, mixed mode)

$ java Split
split_banthar: 1231
split_tskuzzy: 1464
split_tskuzzy2: 1742
string.split: 1291
StringTokenizer: 1517
  • 1
    thanks for this benchmark. Your code is "unfair" though since the StringTokenizer part avoids creating a List and converting it to an array....great starting point though! – Yossi Farjoun Dec 28 '16 at 17:56
  • 2
    to avoid regex creation inside split method, having 1 char long pattern isn't enough. This char also must not be one of the regex meta characters ".$|()[{^?*+\\" e.g. split(".") will create/compile regex pattern. (verified on jdk8 at least) – andrii Jun 21 '18 at 23:55
19

If you can use third-party libraries, Guava's Splitter doesn't incur the overhead of regular expressions when you don't ask for it, and is very fast as a general rule. (Disclosure: I contribute to Guava.)

Iterable<String> split = Splitter.on('/').split(string);

(Also, Splitter is as a rule much more predictable than String.split.)

8

StringTokenizer is much faster for simple parsing like this (I did some benchmarking with a while back and you get huge speedups).

StringTokenizer st = new StringTokenizer("1/2/3","/");
String[] arr = st.countTokens();
arr[0] = st.nextToken();

If you want to eek out a little more performance, you can do it manually as well:

String s = "1/2/3"
char[] c = s.toCharArray();
LinkedList<String> ll = new LinkedList<String>();
int index = 0;

for(int i=0;i<c.length;i++) {
    if(c[i] == '/') {
        ll.add(s.substring(index,i));
        index = i+1;
    }
}

String[] arr = ll.size();
Iterator<String> iter = ll.iterator();
index = 0;

for(index = 0; iter.hasNext(); index++)
    arr[index++] = iter.next();
  • 4
    StringTokenizer is a legacy class that is retained for compatibility reasons although its use is discouraged in new code. It is recommended that anyone seeking this functionality use the split method of String or the java.util.regex package instead. – Nandkumar Tekale Jun 12 '12 at 17:07
  • 3
    Just because it's legacy doesn't mean it's not useful. And in fact, this particular class is actually very useful for that extra performance boost so I am actually against this "legacy" label. – tskuzzy Jun 12 '12 at 17:09
  • 3
    The split method of String and the java.util.regex package incur the significant overhead of using regexes. StringTokenizer does not. – Louis Wasserman Jun 12 '12 at 17:09
  • 2
    @tskuzzy it doesn't matter whether you are against "legacy" label or not, as javadoc says: its use discouraged. – Nandkumar Tekale Jun 12 '12 at 17:17
  • 2
    @NandkumarTekale You did not apparently understand my point. But if you want to avoid using "legacy" classes in favor of "slow" ones that is your choice. – javadba Jan 22 '14 at 16:00
3

java.util.StringTokenizer(String str, String delim) is about twice as fast according to this post.

However, unless your application is of a gigantic scale, split should be fine for you (c.f. same post, it cites thousands of strings in a few miliseconds).

  • it doesn't take a gigantic-scale application, a split in a tight loop such as a document parser is enough -and frequent- Think about typical routines of parsing twitterlinks, emails, hashtags .... They are fed with Mb of text to parse. The routine itself can have a few dozen lines but will be called hundreds of times per second. – rupps Aug 19 '14 at 13:55
3

Seeing as I am working at large scale, I thought it would help to provide some more benchmarking, including a few of my own implementations (I split on spaces, but this should illustrate how long it takes in general):

I'm working with a 426 MB file, with 2622761 lines. The only whitespace are normal spaces (" ") and lines ("\n").

First I replace all lines with spaces, and benchmark parsing one huge line:

.split(" ")
Cumulative time: 31.431366952 seconds

.split("\s")
Cumulative time: 52.948729489 seconds

splitStringChArray()
Cumulative time: 38.721338004 seconds

splitStringChList()
Cumulative time: 12.716065893 seconds

splitStringCodes()
Cumulative time: 1 minutes, 21.349029036000005 seconds

splitStringCharCodes()
Cumulative time: 23.459840685 seconds

StringTokenizer
Cumulative time: 1 minutes, 11.501686094999997 seconds

Then I benchmark splitting line by line (meaning that the functions and loops are done many times, instead of all at once):

.split(" ")
Cumulative time: 3.809014174 seconds

.split("\s")
Cumulative time: 7.906730124 seconds

splitStringChArray()
Cumulative time: 4.06576739 seconds

splitStringChList()
Cumulative time: 2.857809996 seconds

Bonus: splitStringChList(), but creating a new StringBuilder every time (the average difference is actually more like .42 seconds):
Cumulative time: 3.82026621 seconds

splitStringCodes()
Cumulative time: 11.730249921 seconds

splitStringCharCodes()
Cumulative time: 6.995555826 seconds

StringTokenizer
Cumulative time: 4.500008172 seconds

Here is the code:

// Use a char array, and count the number of instances first.
public static String[] splitStringChArray(String str, StringBuilder sb) {
    char[] strArray = str.toCharArray();
    int count = 0;
    for (char c : strArray) {
        if (c == ' ') {
            count++;
        }
    }
    String[] splitArray = new String[count+1];
    int i=0;
    for (char c : strArray) {
        if (c == ' ') {
            splitArray[i] = sb.toString();
            sb.delete(0, sb.length());
        } else {
            sb.append(c);
        }
    }
    return splitArray;
}

// Use a char array but create an ArrayList, and don't count beforehand.
public static ArrayList<String> splitStringChList(String str, StringBuilder sb) {
    ArrayList<String> words = new ArrayList<String>();
    words.ensureCapacity(str.length()/5);
    char[] strArray = str.toCharArray();
    int i=0;
    for (char c : strArray) {
        if (c == ' ') {
            words.add(sb.toString());
            sb.delete(0, sb.length());
        } else {
            sb.append(c);
        }
    }
    return words;
}

// Using an iterator through code points and returning an ArrayList.
public static ArrayList<String> splitStringCodes(String str) {
    ArrayList<String> words = new ArrayList<String>();
    words.ensureCapacity(str.length()/5);
    IntStream is = str.codePoints();
    OfInt it = is.iterator();
    int cp;
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    while (it.hasNext()) {
        cp = it.next();
        if (cp == 32) {
            words.add(sb.toString());
            sb.delete(0, sb.length());
        } else {
            sb.append(cp);
        }
    }

    return words;
}

// This one is for compatibility with supplementary or surrogate characters (by using Character.codePointAt())
public static ArrayList<String> splitStringCharCodes(String str, StringBuilder sb) {
    char[] strArray = str.toCharArray();
    ArrayList<String> words = new ArrayList<String>();
    words.ensureCapacity(str.length()/5);
    int cp;
    int len = strArray.length;
    for (int i=0; i<len; i++) {
        cp = Character.codePointAt(strArray, i);
        if (cp == ' ') {
            words.add(sb.toString());
            sb.delete(0, sb.length());
        } else {
            sb.append(cp);
        }
    }

    return words;
}

This is how I used StringTokenizer:

    StringTokenizer tokenizer = new StringTokenizer(file.getCurrentString());
    words = new String[tokenizer.countTokens()];
    int i = 0;
    while (tokenizer.hasMoreTokens()) {
        words[i] = tokenizer.nextToken();
        i++;
    }
  • splitStringChList discards the last string. Add before return: java if (sb.length() > 0) words.add(sb.toString()); Also: - replace sb.delete(0, sb.length()); with sb.setLength(0); - remove unused int i=0; – Systemsplanet May 31 '18 at 21:47
2

Guava has a Splitter which is more flexible that the String.split() method, and doesn't (necessarily) use a regex. OTOH, String.split() has been optimized in Java 7 to avoid the regex machinery if the separator is a single char. So the performance should be similar in Java 7.

  • Oh OK I'm using Java 5 (unfortunately yeah, can't change that) – Matthieu Napoli Jun 13 '12 at 9:04
2

StringTokenizer is faster than any other splitting method, but getting the tokenizer to return the delimiters along with the tokenized string improves performance by something like 50%. That is achieved by using the constructor java.util.StringTokenizer.StringTokenizer(String str, String delim, boolean returnDelims). Here some other insights on that matter: Performance of StringTokenizer class vs. split method in Java

0

The String's split method is probably a safer choice. As of at least java 6 (though the api reference is for 7) they basically say that use of the StringTokenizer is discouraged. Their wording is quoted below.

"StringTokenizer is a legacy class that is retained for compatibility reasons although its use is discouraged in new code. It is recommended that anyone seeking this functionality use the split method of String or the java.util.regex package instead."

0

You can write the split function yourself , which is going to be the fastest. Here is the link that proves it , it worked for me too, optimized my code by 6X

StringTokenizer - reading lines with integers

Split: 366ms IndexOf: 50ms StringTokenizer: 89ms GuavaSplit: 109ms IndexOf2 (some super optimised solution given in the above question): 14ms CsvMapperSplit (mapping row by row): 326ms CsvMapperSplit_DOC (building one doc and mapping all rows in one go): 177ms

0

Use Apache Commons Lang » 3.0 's

StringUtils.splitByWholeSeparator("ab-!-cd-!-ef", "-!-") = ["ab", "cd", "ef"]

If you need non regex split and wants the results in String array, then use StringUtils, I compared StringUtils.splitByWholeSeparator with Guava's Splitter and Java's String split, and found StringUtils is faster.

  1. StringUtils - 8ms
  2. String - 11ms
  3. Splitter - 1ms (but returns Iterable/Iterator and converting them to string array takes total of 54ms)

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.