133

I am trying to use xargs to call a more complex function in parallel.

#!/bin/bash
echo_var(){
    echo $1
    return 0
}
seq -f "n%04g" 1 100 |xargs -n 1 -P 10 -i echo_var {} 
exit 0

This returns the error

xargs: echo_var: No such file or directory

Any ideas on how I can use xargs to accomplish this, or any other solution(s) would be welcome.

  • 1
    Danger, user1148366, Danger! Don't use bash for parallel programming- you will run into so many problems. Use C/C++ and pthreads, or Java threads, or anything that makes you think long and hard about what you're doing, because parallel programming takes a lot of thought to get right. – David Souther Jun 12 '12 at 19:44
  • 22
    @DavidSouther If the tasks are independent, such as convert all these picture files to png, then don't worry. It is when you have synchronisation (beyond wait for all to finish) and communication that it gets messy. – ctrl-alt-delor Feb 26 '14 at 15:41
  • @DavidSouther - I am a long time Java dev and I have been working in groovy of late. And I continue to tell people: Friends don't let friends write bash script. And yet, I find myself looking at this post/solution because (sad face :( ) I am engaged in parallel processing in bash. I could readily do it in groovy/java. Bad! – Christian Bongiorno Feb 8 at 0:50
  • Also discussed in unix.stackexchange.com/questions/158564/… – Joshua Goldberg Feb 28 at 17:38
130

Exporting the function should do it (untested):

export -f echo_var
seq -f "n%04g" 1 100 | xargs -n 1 -P 10 -I {} bash -c 'echo_var "$@"' _ {}

You can use the builtin printf instead of the external seq:

printf "n%04g\n" {1..100} | xargs -n 1 -P 10 -I {} bash -c 'echo_var "$@"' _ {}

Also, using return 0 and exit 0 like that masks any error value that might be produced by the command preceding it. Also, if there's no error, it's the default and thus somewhat redundant.

  • 14
    A bit more discussion: xargs executes a completely new instance of the process named. In this case, you provide the name echo_var, which is a function in this script, not a process (program) in your PATH. What Dennis' solution does is export the function for child bash processes to use, then forks to the subprocess and executes there. – David Souther Jun 12 '12 at 19:39
  • 4
    what is the significance of _ and \ , without them it wasn't working for me – Hashbrown Oct 19 '13 at 8:16
  • 7
    @Hashbrown: The underscore (_) provides a place holder for argv[0] ($0) and almost anything could be used there. I think I added the backslash-semicolon (\;) because of its use in terminating the -exec clause in find, but it works for me without it here. In fact, if the function were to use $@ instead of $1 then it would see the semicolon as a parameter, so it should be omitted. – Dennis Williamson Oct 19 '13 at 11:35
  • 3
    -i argument to xargs is since been deprecated. Use -I (capital i) instead. – Nicolai S Jul 7 '15 at 20:44
  • 11
    You can simplify this by including the argument from xargs in the command string for bash with bash -c 'echo_var "{}"'. So you do not need the _ {} at the end. – phobic Jun 2 '16 at 8:57
16

Using GNU Parallel is looks like this:

#!/bin/bash
echo_var(){
    echo $1
    return 0
}
export -f echo_var
seq -f "n%04g" 1 100 | parallel -P 10 echo_var {} 
exit 0

If you use version 20170822 you do not even have to export -f as long as you have run this:

. `which env_parallel.bash`
seq -f "n%04g" 1 100 | env_parallel -P 10 echo_var {} 
  • where do I get shopt for osx? – Nick Oct 11 '14 at 15:01
  • nvm it is setopt in zsh – Nick Oct 11 '14 at 15:08
  • Getting this below eerror Ole sh: parallel_bash_environment: line 67: unexpected EOF while looking for matching '' sh: parallel_bash_environment: line 79: syntax error: unexpected end of file sh: error importing function definition for parallel_bash_environment' /usr/local/bin/bash: parallel_bash_environment: line 67: unexpected EOF while looking for matching '' /usr/local/bin/bash: parallel_bash_environment: line 79: syntax error: unexpected end of file /usr/local/bin/bash: error importing function definition for ` ... – Nick Oct 11 '14 at 15:16
  • You have been shellaftershocked: Shellshock did not affect GNU Parallel directly. The solution to shellshock, however, did: It utterly broke --env and the env_parallel trick. It is believed to be fixed in the git version: git.savannah.gnu.org/cgit/parallel.git/snapshot/… – Ole Tange Oct 11 '14 at 18:19
  • 1
    I like this answer, because it made me discover the parallel tool – JR Utily Feb 9 '15 at 14:03
7

Something like this should work also:

function testing() { sleep $1 ; }
echo {1..10} | xargs -n 1 | xargs -I@ -P4 bash -c "$(declare -f testing) ; testing @ ; echo @ "
0

Maybe this is bad practice, but you if you are defining functions in a .bashrc or other script, you can wrap the file or at least the function definitions with a setting of allexport:

set -o allexport

function funcy_town {
  echo 'this is a function'
}
function func_rock {
  echo 'this is a function, but different'
}
function cyber_func {
  echo 'this function does important things'
}
function the_man_from_funcle {
  echo 'not gonna lie'
}
function funcle_wiggly {
  echo 'at this point I\'m doing it for the funny names'
}
function extreme_function {
  echo 'goodbye'
}

set +o allexport

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