77

I have a query that returns avg(price)

  select avg(price)
  from(
      select *, cume_dist() OVER (ORDER BY price desc) from web_price_scan
      where listing_Type='AARM'
        and u_kbalikepartnumbers_id = 1000307
        and (EXTRACT(Day FROM (Now()-dateEnded)))*24 < 48
        and price>( select avg(price)* 0.50
                    from(select *, cume_dist() OVER (ORDER BY price desc)
                         from web_price_scan
                         where listing_Type='AARM'
                           and u_kbalikepartnumbers_id = 1000307
                           and (EXTRACT(Day FROM (Now()-dateEnded)))*24 < 48
                        )g
                   where cume_dist < 0.50
                 )
        and price<( select avg(price)*2
                    from( select *, cume_dist() OVER (ORDER BY price desc)
                          from web_price_scan
                          where listing_Type='AARM'
                            and u_kbalikepartnumbers_id = 1000307
                            and (EXTRACT(Day FROM (Now()-dateEnded)))*24 < 48
                        )d
                    where cume_dist < 0.50)
     )s

  having count(*) > 5

how to make it return 0 if no value is available?

  • 1
    Are you sure that you're query is well formed ? – Luc M Jun 13 '12 at 1:28
  • 2
    @LucM: It can't be a well-formed query. ("having" clause without a "group by" clause.) – Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Jun 13 '12 at 1:42
  • everything work fine, except that sometimes, when rules are not met, it does not return anything. In addition, how can I gorup by average, I don't think it is possible||whats the point? Multiple selects from web_price_scan are separate selects; not sure what the issue here? – Andrew Jun 13 '12 at 16:08
146

use coalesce

COALESCE(value [, ...])
The COALESCE function returns the first of its arguments that is not null.  
Null is returned only if all arguments are null. It is often
used to substitute a default value for null values when data is
retrieved for display.

Edit Here'san example of COALESCE with your query:

SELECT AVG( price )
FROM(
      SELECT *, cume_dist() OVER ( ORDER BY price DESC ) FROM web_price_scan
      WHERE listing_Type = 'AARM'
        AND u_kbalikepartnumbers_id = 1000307
        AND ( EXTRACT( DAY FROM ( NOW() - dateEnded ) ) ) * 24 < 48
        AND COALESCE( price, 0 ) > ( SELECT AVG( COALESCE( price, 0 ) )* 0.50
                                     FROM ( SELECT *, cume_dist() OVER ( ORDER BY price DESC )
                                           FROM web_price_scan
                                           WHERE listing_Type='AARM'
                                             AND u_kbalikepartnumbers_id = 1000307
                                             AND ( EXTRACT( DAY FROM ( NOW() - dateEnded ) ) ) * 24 < 48
                                         ) g
                                    WHERE cume_dist < 0.50
                                  )
        AND COALESCE( price, 0 ) < ( SELECT AVG( COALESCE( price, 0 ) ) *2
                                     FROM( SELECT *, cume_dist() OVER ( ORDER BY price desc )
                                           FROM web_price_scan
                                           WHERE listing_Type='AARM'
                                             AND u_kbalikepartnumbers_id = 1000307
                                             AND ( EXTRACT( DAY FROM ( NOW() - dateEnded ) ) ) * 24 < 48
                                         ) d
                                     WHERE cume_dist < 0.50)
     )s
HAVING COUNT(*) > 5

IMHO COALESCE should not be use with AVG because it modifies the value. NULL means unknow and nothing else. It's not like using it in SUM. In this example, if we replace AVG by SUM, the result is not distorted. Adding 0 to a sum doesn't hurt anyone but calculating an average with 0 for the unknown values, you don't get the real average.

In that case, I would add price IS NOT NULL in WHERE clause to avoid these unknown values.

  • I could not make it work; example would help – Andrew Jun 13 '12 at 1:27
  • 1
    @Andrew I was trying to give you an example using your query. But I get lost. I doubt that this query works. from web_price_scan... seems repeated... – Luc M Jun 13 '12 at 1:31
  • For those wondering, NULLIF(v1, v2) does pretty much the opposite of COALESCE in that it returns NULL if v1 equals v2. – s.m. Jun 8 '16 at 6:30
16

(this answer was added to provide shorter and more generic examples to the question - without including all the case-specific details in the original question).


There are two distinct "problems" here, the first is if a table or subquery has no rows, the second is if there are NULL values in the query.

For all versions I've tested, postgres and mysql will ignore all NULL values when averaging, and it will return NULL if there are nothing to average over. This generally makes sense, as NULL is to be considered "unknown". If you want to override this you can use coalesce (as suggested by Luc M).

$ create table foo (bar int);
CREATE TABLE

$ select avg(bar) from foo;
 avg 
-----

(1 row)

$ select coalesce(avg(bar), 0) from foo;
 coalesce 
----------
        0
(1 row)

$ insert into foo values (3);
INSERT 0 1
$ insert into foo values (9);
INSERT 0 1
$ insert into foo values (NULL);
INSERT 0 1
$ select coalesce(avg(bar), 0) from foo;
      coalesce      
--------------------
 6.0000000000000000
(1 row)

of course, "from foo" can be replaced by "from (... any complicated logic here ...) as foo"

Now, should the NULL row in the table be counted as 0? Then coalesce has to be used inside the avg call.

$ select coalesce(avg(coalesce(bar, 0)), 0) from foo;
      coalesce      
--------------------
 4.0000000000000000
(1 row)

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