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I wrote a simple genetic algorithm that can solve traveling salesman problem with 5 cities. I want to see how it does on a problem with more cities, something like 10, 25, 50, 100, but I can't find a sample date for the problem to try it on. Basically, I am looking for 2D lists or matrices with distances between cities. It would be nice if there is a solution. Where should I look?

Thank You in Advance

  • Do you want data with exact solutions, or just data? You can always just construct your own data sets if you'd like. Also, are you looking for Euclidean TSP instances, or arbitrary TSP instances? – templatetypedef Jun 13 '12 at 2:15
  • If solutions are included it would be nice. I don't know what Euclidean and Arbitrary TSP instances are. I am just starting. – Akavall Jun 13 '12 at 2:27
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    You can also create sets with known solutions to get started - for instance, create n points on a circle. The best solution is to traverse them in order, and you can approximate the ideal path length by the length of the circle. – Mathias Jun 13 '12 at 3:01
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A well-known benchmark library for the TSP with instances ranging from as few as 14 to close to 100,000 cities is the TSPLIB. The instances have been solved to optimality, for some instances the optimal solution is also available.

Many of the instances have a real-world background such as travel been cities in Germany, Switzerland, the USA, or in the whole world. Some of the instances represent drilling problems for computer board layout There's also an instance that represents the voyage of Ulysses.

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The sources I've found online are quite huge. I might be doing something wrong, but 10 places (cities) take ~0.6s and 11 places take ~7s. The smallest known-solution dataset I could find was 15 places (and considered "small", the "classical" one being 48 places) but perhaps those are for optimized (non-brute force) algorithms. In the end I made my own table with real-world cities:

           m
           a
           a                           h
           s       h   s               u
           t   a   e   i   g           l
           r   a   e   t   e           s
           i   c   r   t   l   e   b   b   a       e
           c   h   l   a   e   c   o   e   n   o   p
           h   e   e   r   e   h   n   r   n   h   e
           t   n   n   d   n   t   n   g   e   e   n
maastricht 0   29  20  21  16  31  100 12  4   31  18
    aachen 29  0   15  29  28  40  72  21  29  41  12
   heerlen 20  15  0   15  14  25  81  9   23  27  13
   sittard 21  29  15  0   4   12  92  12  25  13  25
    geleen 16  28  14  4   0   16  94  9   20  16  22
      echt 31  40  25  12  16  0   95  24  36  3   37
      bonn 100 72  81  92  94  95  0   90  101 99  84
  hulsberg 12  21  9   12  9   24  90  0   15  25  13
     kanne 4   29  23  25  20  36  101 15  0   35  18
       ohe 31  41  27  13  16  3   99  25  35  0   38
      epen 18  12  13  25  22  37  84  13  18  38  0

Optimal (by program): cities 0-7-4-3-9-5-2-6-1-10-8-0 = 253km
maastricht -> hulsberg -> geleen -> sittard -> ohe -> kanne -> echt
-> heerlen -> bonn -> aachen -> epen -> kanne -> maastricht

The data format readable by the program is a partial table (because it's symmetrical):

29 20 21 16 31 100 12 4 31 18
15 29 28 40 72 21 29 41 12
15 14 25 81 9 23 27 13
4 12 92 12 25 13 25
16 94 9 20 16 22
95 24 36 3 37
90 101 99 84
15 25 13
35 18
38

For me this takes ~6.7 seconds to process on a 3rd gen i7 (i7-3630QM). Program is written in C++, single-threaded and simply brute-forces the possibilities. For testing it might be more practical to remove one place, then it takes ~660ms (0.7s) which is still enough to see if code changes make much of a difference.

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