13

I have one BaseEntity which abstracts id and version property. this class also implements hashcode and equals based on PK (id) property.

BaseEntity{

    Long id;
    Long version; 

public int hashCode() {
    final int prime = 31;
    int result = 1;
    result = prime * result + ((id == null) ? 0 : id.hashCode());
    return result;
}

public boolean equals(Object obj) {
    if (this == obj)
        return true;
    if (obj == null)
        return false;
    if (getClass() != obj.getClass())
        return false;
    BaseEntity other = (BaseEntity) obj;
    if (id == null) {
        if (other.id != null)
            return false;
    } else if (!id.equals(other.id))
        return false;
    return true;
}


}

now two Entity A and B extends BaseEntity as below

A extends BaseEntity{
    `B b`
     B getB(){return b;)
     void setB(B b){this.b=b;}
}

B extends BaseEntity{
}

object b1;
object a1;
a1.set(b1);
session.save(a1) //cascade save;

close session load a with lazy b and try a1.getB().equals(b1) gives false but if i compare with a1.getB().getId().equals(b1.getId()) then gives true strange!! i think it is because of java assist proxy object, anyway to resolve this?

29

To be able to lazy-load the a.b association, Hibernate sets the b field in a to a proxy. The proxy is an instance of a class that extends B, but is not B. So, your equals() method will always fail when comparing a non-proxy B instance to a proxy B instance, because it compares the classes of both objects:

if (getClass() != obj.getClass())
    return false;

In the case of Hibernate entities, you should replace this with

if (!(obj instanceof B)) {
    return false;
}

Also, note that

  • Hibernate recommends not implementing equals() and hashCode() by using the ID, but rather by using a natural identifier. Implementing it with IDs can cause problems because entities don't have an ID until they're saved and the ID is generated
  • When using entity inheritance, the problem is even worse. Suppose B is a superclass of two sub-entities B1 and B2. Hiberante can't know which type (B1 or B2) is a.b before loading it. So a.b will be initialized to a proxy which is a subclass of B, but is not a subclass of B1 or B2. So the hashCode() and equals() methods should be implemented in B, but not be overridden in B1 and B2. Two B instances should be considered equal if they're instances of B, and have the same identifier.
| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks, got it. agree with you for issues which can arise due to equals() and hashcode() based in Id. i think right now i will go with instanceof option as introducing natural id at this stage in app would be difficult. – Jigar Parekh Jul 3 '12 at 13:48
12

I use Hibernate.getClass for many years and I never noticed a problem:

@Override    
public boolean equals(final Object obj) {
    if (this == obj) {
        return true;
    }
    if (obj == null) {
        return false;
    }
    if (Hibernate.getClass(this) != Hibernate.getClass(obj)) {
        return false;
    }

    ... check for values

    return true;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 6
    Except your domain classes are now hardly coupled with Hibernate. Assume you want to share your domain with some other application not using hibernate at all..now you are in a trouble. Don't get me wrong it will work, but it smells very badly. Also if hibernate guys decide to move\delete the proxy util and you upgrade the hibernate - domain won't compile anymore. – Vadim Kirilchuk Sep 1 '16 at 9:09
3

You can also make it works this way, usefull if you don't know wich instance is B (may happen if your equals is in a superclass)

if (HibernateProxyHelper.getClassWithoutInitializingProxy(this) != HibernateProxyHelper.getClassWithoutInitializingProxy(obj)) 
    return false
| improve this answer | |
  • Please see my comment to the Ralph's answer. You are also coupling your domain classes with Hibernate dependency. – Vadim Kirilchuk Sep 1 '16 at 9:10
-1

This is mostly an effect of standard Java inheritance.

a1.getB().equals(b1) uses Object.equals() (except if you've overridden equals() in your class), which only returns true if a1.getB() and b1 are the same instance. I don't know what you've done exactly (your code formatting is broken), but it looks like you've loaded a again in a different session, so you get a new instance for a and a.getB(), and consequently Object.equals() returns false.

a1.getB().getId().equals(b1.getId()) uses Long.equals(), which returns true if the long values are the same (even for different instances of the Long object), and these values are obviously the same.

| improve this answer | |
  • corrected code formatting, as per my code i think it should invoke equals on BaseEntity rather than Object.equals(), currently it is invoking Object.equals() not sure why – Jigar Parekh Jun 19 '12 at 4:38
  • Can you add the code for A.getB() (which type?), BaseEntity.equals() and for the mapping of A (at least id and the member b)? Perhaps then I can see more. – Johanna Jun 19 '12 at 8:56
  • The problem is, the late binding of Java does not find equals() in BaseEntity. So can you please provide the complete code of BaseEntity.equals() including exact parameter and access modifier (public?). – Johanna Jun 29 '12 at 14:48

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