18

Here are the basic events I want to happen when my WPF application starts. This is very similar to how Word starts on my machine.

  1. Display busy cursor.
  2. Perform basic initialization. This takes a couple of seconds and needs to be done before splash screen is displayed.
  3. Display splash screen. This splash screen displays progress into more in-depth initialization and can take awhile (caches information from database).
  4. Display default cursor. Since splash screen is displaying progress now, there's no need to display a busy cursor.
  5. Once splash screen progress is complete, display main window.
  6. Close splash screen.

Everything works fine except for the displaying of the busy cursor prior to the splash screen being displayed. When I execute the application through a shortcut, the wait cursor flashes, but soon goes back to the default. I've tried different ways to set the Cursor but none work, but I think the problem is that I'm not in a control/window--I'm doing it from within App.xaml.cs. And, the properties I'm setting seem to be Windows Forms properties. Here is an excerpt from my code in App.xaml.cs.

protected override void OnStartup(StartupEventArgs e)
{
  base.OnStartup(e);

  System.Windows.Forms.Application.UseWaitCursor = true;
  //System.Windows.Forms.Cursor.Current = System.Windows.Forms.Cursors.WaitCursor;
  //System.Windows.Forms.Application.DoEvents();

  Initialize();

  SplashWindow splash = new SplashWindow();
  splash.Show();

  System.Windows.Forms.Cursor.Current = System.Windows.Forms.Cursors.Default;

  // Right now I'm showing main window right after splash screen but I will eventually wait until splash screen closes.
  MainWindow main = new MainWindow();
  main.Show();
}
46

This should work

Mouse.OverrideCursor = System.Windows.Input.Cursors.Wait;

Use System.Windows.Input not System.Windows.Forms.

  • 1
    Added that and it still acts the same as before. If I don't reset the OverrideCursor to null after I initially set it, the wait cursor is displayed when I put the cursor over the window. But, it is not shown when the app is initially starting. – bsh152s Jun 13 '12 at 19:36
  • Hmm, I've been playing with it for a while, it seems it is very difficult if not impossible to change the cursor outside of the actual window(you'll notice even with this code the wait cursor goes away when the mouse leaves the window). Sorry I couldn't be of more help. – Kevin DiTraglia Jun 13 '12 at 20:03
  • This is good. Just setting the this.Cursor value only changes it for the Window, if you hover over a control you get the default cursor and not the wait cursor. Mouse.OverrideCursor seems to set the wait cursor for the Window and everything in it. – Richard Moore Feb 10 '18 at 15:35
28

If you have a task that takes a significant amount of time, and it is running on a non-GUI thread, (which is a good idea) you can use this code to change the application cursor:

Application.Current.Dispatcher.Invoke(() =>
{
    Mouse.OverrideCursor = Cursors.Wait;
});

When the busy process completes, use this:

Application.Current.Dispatcher.Invoke(() =>
{
    Mouse.OverrideCursor = null;
});
2

I'm assuming the Initialize() is the part that you want your busy cursor to appear for, yes?

If so, try the following approach:

  1. In your MainWindow.xaml, on the <Window> element, set the following properties: Visibility="Hidden" and Cursor="Wait".
  2. In your MainWindow.xaml.cs, move the initialization code out of the constructor and into a public Initialize() method, so that any code that depends on the Initialize() call doesn't get executed. Make sure the end of your Initialize() method sets the Visiblity property to Visible and resets the Cursor as well.
  3. Update the code snippet posted above to something like the following:
protected override void OnStartup(StartupEventArgs e)
{
  base.OnStartup(e);

  MainWindow main = new MainWindow();
  main.Show(); // this should set the cursor how you want it
  Initialize();
  SplashWindow splash = new SplashWindow();
  splash.Show();
  main.Initialize(); // now invoke the Initialize method you created
  // Right now I'm showing main window right after splash screen but I will eventually wait until splash screen closes.
}
0
        Mouse.OverrideCursor = System.Windows.Input.Cursors.Wait;
        InitializeComponent();
        ...
        Mouse.OverrideCursor = null;

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