5

I'm logging various performance metrics to the console (if present). This content is best viewed as a table, and FireBug's console.table() method works great--but most of my users are in Chrome.

console.table() is a great solution, because I get a well-formatted UI styled grid without needing to build and maintain a dedicated UI control. Currently, in Chrome, I can only log unformatted text.

Alternatively, if there is a way to render HTML content in the console, that would work too. I can send html to the console, but it renders as DOM content does in the elements tab. I know the inspector is just HTML/JS/CSS--so it's technically possible. In fact, I can do it when I inspect the inspector--but this doesn't solve the problem for the real world.

  • Have you been thinking about building own Chrome extension? – Tadeck Jun 14 '12 at 4:04
  • It's a valid option, but not all consumers of the app will be able to do this. The primary use case is: a customer thinks the app is slow and calls Support. Support says, "please open your console and copy/paste me the results". The customer may or may not copy/paste everything and Support may or may not validate the result. I then get an email with performance data that doesn't have the full picture. If it's baked into the browser in such a way that reduces the possibility of errors, that's ideal. – Christopher Jun 14 '12 at 4:10
  • If you want it the way you will be able to use it by getting what user pasted, you can just use JSON.stringify() on your table data and tell user to get it, paste into the email & send. After receiving it you just get deserialized data, it does not even need to be a table. Does that suit you? – Tadeck Jun 14 '12 at 4:12
  • That's essentially what I'm doing now; but it's still suboptimal. This is a single-page, dynamic app. Normally, there are no page refreshes. On top of that, we're issuing lots of ajax requests. The page is changing in real time as you interact with it, so the volume of requests is quite large. Further, in addition to the console.info() calls I'm making with perf data, there are any number of other log entries. If they send everything, auto-parsing into readable text becomes expensive. If they filter, human error is a constant. If I could do this in a console.group(), that would work. – Christopher Jun 14 '12 at 4:28
  • There is another way of logging from JavaScript, you can even avoid user interaction. The solution I am thinking of is Sentry (github.com/dcramer/sentry, getsentry.com) for storing logs on the server and Raven-JS (github.com/lincolnloop/raven-js) for sending them from JavaScript (configuration described here: getsentry.com/docs/javascript). If you need to gather logs from multiple clients, this is the way. Supports multiple levels, details etc. If you want the user to initiate it, you can add requirement to type enableSentry() in the console (for example). – Tadeck Jun 14 '12 at 4:42
5

Now you can do it in Chrome Canary https://plus.google.com/+GoogleChromeDevelopers/posts/j8dMDxqbVv7

4

I had the same problem and wrote the code below. It isn't as fully featured as console.table, it only accepts an array of records, and doesn't take a list of columns. The output also isn't as nice, but it was enough for me. An example:

$ console_table([{who:"World",message:"Hello"}
                ,{who:"My wife",message:"Good Morning!"}])
|who    |message      |
|World  |Hello        |
|My wife|Good Morning!|

And the code behind it:

// Will be available in the latest Chrome, then I can delete this
function console_table(xs)
{
    if (xs.length === 0)
        console.log("No data");
    else
    {
        var widths = [];
        var cells = [];
        for (var i = 0; i <= xs.length; i++)
            cells.push([]);
        for (var s in xs[0])
        {
            var len = s.length;
            cells[0].push(s);
            for (var i = 0; i < xs.length; i++)
            {
                var ss = "" + xs[i][s];
                len = Math.max(len, ss.length);
                cells[i+1].push(ss);
            }
            widths.push(len);
        }
        var s = "";
        for (var x = 0; x < cells.length; x++)
        {
            for (var y = 0; y < widths.length; y++)
                s += "|" + pad(widths[y], cells[x][y]);
            s += "|\n";
        }
        console.log(s);
    }
}

function pad(n,s)
{
    var res = s;
    for (var i = s.length; i < n; i++)
        res += " ";
    return res;
}
  • +1 for being a useful hack, even if not precisely an answer to the (somewhat vaguely-formed) question. – Tripp Lilley Mar 13 '13 at 19:59
1

It also works in Chrome 31 and Firefox 25 as of today.

  • It is NOT supported in clean Firefox 25.0.1 (maybe you tried it with Firebug active on a page) – Victor Nov 18 '13 at 18:17
0

moved pad inside

// Will be available in the latest Chrome, then I can delete this
function console_table(xs)
{

    function pad(n,s)
    {
        var res = s;
        for (var i = s.length; i < n; i++)
            res += " ";
        return res;
    }

    if (xs.length === 0)
        console.log("No data");
    else
    {
        var widths = [];
        var cells = [];
        for (var i = 0; i <= xs.length; i++)
            cells.push([]);
        for (var s in xs[0])
        {
            var len = s.length;
            cells[0].push(s);
            for (var i = 0; i < xs.length; i++)
            {
                var ss = "" + xs[i][s];
                len = Math.max(len, ss.length);
                cells[i+1].push(ss);
            }
            widths.push(len);
        }
        var s = "";
        for (var x = 0; x < cells.length; x++)
        {
            for (var y = 0; y < widths.length; y++)
                s += "|" + pad(widths[y], cells[x][y]);
            s += "|\n";
        }
        console.log(s);
    }
}

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