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How would you check if a String was a number before parsing it?

  • 33
    All the solutions proposed with regular expresions will not work for hexadecimal numbers. – Oscar Castiblanco Feb 17 '12 at 12:52
  • and passing null string in matches(...) function will throw NullPointer exception. – Hitesh Sahu Apr 14 '16 at 7:31
  • See Max Malysh's answer for a concise Java 8 solution without third-party libraries. – Andy Thomas Apr 28 '16 at 19:50
  • @HiteshSahu null strings seem to be gracefully handled in latest version (including Java 6.x and 7.x) – lifebalance Oct 6 '16 at 6:27
  • All the solutions proposed to use Integer.parseInt() will fail to parse mobile numbers with NumberFormatException. – Not a bug Mar 16 '17 at 7:24

39 Answers 39

1

You could use BigDecimal if the string may contain decimals:

try {
    new java.math.BigInteger(testString);
} catch(NumberFormatException e) {
    throw new RuntimeException("Not a valid number");
}
  • 6
    Welcome to stackoverflow. Generally, it is best to avoid resurrecting old threads unless the response adds something significantly different to the thread. While valid, that approach was already mentioned in the accepted answer. – Leigh Apr 6 '12 at 21:28
  • It would create a sonar issue if you don't log the exception – jmhostalet Apr 12 '18 at 9:55
1

This is the fastest way i know to check if String is Number or not:

public static boolean isNumber(String str){
  int i=0, len=str.length();
  boolean a=false,b=false,c=false, d=false;
  if(i<len && (str.charAt(i)=='+' || str.charAt(i)=='-')) i++;
  while( i<len && isDigit(str.charAt(i)) ){ i++; a=true; }
  if(i<len && (str.charAt(i)=='.')) i++;
  while( i<len && isDigit(str.charAt(i)) ){ i++; b=true; }
  if(i<len && (str.charAt(i)=='e' || str.charAt(i)=='E') && (a || b)){ i++; c=true; }
  if(i<len && (str.charAt(i)=='+' || str.charAt(i)=='-') && c) i++;
  while( i<len && isDigit(str.charAt(i)) ){ i++; d=true;}
  return i==len && (a||b) && (!c || (c && d));
}
static boolean isDigit(char c){
  return c=='0' || c=='1' || c=='2' || c=='3' || c=='4' || c=='5' || c=='6' || c=='7' || c=='8' || c=='9';
}
1

Parallel checking for very long strings using IntStream

In Java 8, the following tests if all characters of the given string are within '0' to '9'. Mind that the empty string is accepted:

string.chars().unordered().parallel().allMatch( i -> '0' <= i && '9' >= i )
1

If you guys using the following method to check:

public static boolean isNumeric(String str) {
    NumberFormat formatter = NumberFormat.getInstance();
    ParsePosition pos = new ParsePosition(0);
    formatter.parse(str, pos);
    return str.length() == pos.getIndex();
}

Then what happend with the input of very long String, such as I call this method:

System.out.println(isNumeric("94328948243242352525243242524243425452342343948923"));

The result is "true", also it is a too-large-size number! The same thing will happen if you using regex to check! So I'd rather using the "parsing" method to check, like this:

public static boolean isNumeric(String str) {
    try {
        int number = Integer.parseInt(str);
        return true;
    } catch (Exception e) {
        return false;
    }
}

And the result is what I expected!

  • "it is a too-large-size number" → There is no such thing as a "too-large-size number". Numbers are infinite. 7645 is a number and 92847294729492875982452012471041141990140811894142729051 is also a number. The first can be represented as an Integer and the second can be represented as a BigDecimal. And even if they could not be represented as an object in Java, they are still numbers -- which is what the question asks. – walen Sep 18 '18 at 8:19
  • Also, don't misuse exceptions. Java isn't python. At least use more specific NumberFormatException – Jiří Dec 13 '18 at 15:55
0

I think the only way to reliably tell if a string is a number, is to parse it. So I would just parse it, and if it's a number, you get the number in an int for free!

0

If you want to do the check using a regex you should create a final static Pattern object, that way the regex only needs to be compiled once. Compiling the regex takes about as long as performing the match so by taking this precaution you'll cut the execution time of the method in half.

final static Pattern NUMBER_PATTERN = Pattern.compile("[+-]?\\d*\\.?\\d+");

static boolean isNumber(String input) {
    Matcher m = NUMBER_PATTERN.matcher(input);
    return m.matches();
}

I'm assuming a number is a string with nothing but decimal digits in it, possibly a + or - sign at the start and at most one decimal point (not at the end) and no other characters (including commas, spaces, numbers in other counting systems, Roman numerals, hieroglyphs).

This solution is succinct and pretty fast but you can shave a couple of milliseconds per million invocations by doing it like this

static boolean isNumber(String s) {
    final int len = s.length();
    if (len == 0) {
        return false;
    }
    int dotCount = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < len; i++) {
        char c = s.charAt(i);
        if (c < '0' || c > '9') {
            if (i == len - 1) {//last character must be digit
                return false;
            } else if (c == '.') {
                if (++dotCount > 1) {
                    return false;
                }
            } else if (i != 0 || c != '+' && c != '-') {//+ or - allowed at start
                return false;
            }

        }
    }
    return true;
}
0

Try this:

public  boolean isNumber(String str)
{       
    short count = 0;
    char chc[]  = {'0','1','2','3','4','5','6','7','8','9','.','-','+'};
    for (char c : str.toCharArray())
    {   
        for (int i = 0;i < chc.length;i++)
        {
            if( c  == chc[i]){
                count++;        
            }
         }                      
    }
    if (count != str.length() ) 
        return false;
    else
        return true;
}
  • 2
    This will return true if you pass it "++++"... – Water Mar 30 '15 at 0:44
-1
String text="hello 123";
if(Pattern.matches([0-9]+))==true
System.out.println("String"+text);
-3
import java.util.Scanner;

public class TestDemo {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        boolean flag = true;
        Scanner sc = new Scanner(System.in);
        System.out.println("Enter the String:");
        String str = sc.nextLine();

        for (int i = 0; i < str.length(); i++) {
            if(str.charAt(i) > 48 && str.charAt(i) < 58) {
                flag = false;
                break;
            }
        }

        if(flag == true) {
            System.out.println("String is a valid String.");
        } else {
            System.out.println("String contains number.");
        }
    }
}

protected by Makoto Nov 29 '15 at 8:34

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