133

I'm using a serial terminal to provide input into our lab experiment. I found that using

$ echo "5X5"

just returns a string of "5X5". Is there a command to execute a multiplication operation?

8 Answers 8

234

Yes, you can use bash's built-in Arithmetic Expansion $(( )) to do some simple maths

$ echo "$((5 * 5))"
25

Check the Shell Arithmetic section in the Bash Reference Manual for a complete list of operators.

For sake of completeness, as other pointed out, if you need arbitrary precision, bc or dc would be better.

0
51

For more advanced and precise math consider using bc(1).

echo "3 * 2.19" | bc -l 
6.57
1
  • this is solution which works with floating point numbers Commented Oct 16, 2023 at 6:12
22

Internal Methods

Bash supports arithmetic expansion with $(( expression )). For example:

$ echo $(( 5 * 5 ))
25

External Methods

A number of utilities provide arithmetic, including bc and expr.

$ echo '5 * 5' | /usr/bin/bc
25

$ /usr/bin/expr 5 \* 5
25
0
18

The classical solution is:

 expr 5 \* 5

expr will only work with integer operands. Another nice option is:

 echo 5 5\*p | dc

dc can be made to work with non-integer operands.

4
  • 1
    dc works with floats. Try echo '4 k 50 7 / p' | dc. The output is 7.1428. The k command sets the precision. Commented Jun 15, 2012 at 0:58
  • @Dennis In two different implementations of dc, I am seeing float operations work without assigning via k. I certainly remember the default precision being 0 (truncation to integer). Am I mis-remembering, or is it simply that newer implementations have changed behavior? Commented Jun 15, 2012 at 1:32
  • I have only used dc rarely over the years since I'm more algebraic and less RPN so I don't remember. On a GNU system I'm using, the default is 0. An old (1993) FreeBSD man page mentions the default being zero, but older BSD man pages don't. Commented Jun 15, 2012 at 1:51
  • By the way (for future readers), my example should have shown non-integer operands instead of only a non-integer result in order to accurately counter the assertion. Never fear, echo '4 k 50.5 7 / p' | dc works (output: 7.2142). Commented Jun 15, 2012 at 1:54
9

A simple shell function (no sed needed) should do the trick of interpreting '5X5'

$ calc() { bc -l <<< ${*//[xX]/*}; }
$ calc 5X5
25
$ calc 5x5
25
$ calc '5*5'
25
2
  • 1
    Note that -- as described in wiki.bash-hackers.org/scripting/obsolete -- the function keyword is a ksh-ism; the POSIX sh standard doesn't specify it, so the more portable way to write that would be calc() { ...; }. Also, using $@ in a context that evaluates to a single string is a bit weird; consider $* in scenarios where you aren't expanding to an array (or otherwise multiple words). Commented Nov 7, 2022 at 15:51
  • Thanks for improving the quality of this answer, @Charles Duffy. I've amended my answer with your input.
    – ikaerom
    Commented Nov 7, 2022 at 22:32
7

I use this function which uses bc and thus supports floating point calculations:

c () { 
    local a
    (( $# > 0 )) && a="$@" || read -r -p "calc: " a
    bc -l <<< "$a"
}

Example:

$ c '5*5'
25
$ c 5/5
1.00000000000000000000
$ c 3.4/7.9
.43037974683544303797

Bash's arithmetic expansion doesn't support floats (but Korn shell and zsh do).

Example:

$ ksh -c 'echo "$((3.0 / 4))"'
0.75
4

I have a simple script I use for this:

me@mycomputer:~$ cat /usr/local/bin/c

#!/bin/sh

echo "$*" | sed 's/x/\*/g' | bc -l

It changes x to * since * is a special character in the shell. Use it as follows:

  • c 5x5
  • c 5-4.2 + 1
  • c '(5 + 5) * 30' (you still have to use quotes if the expression contains any parentheses).
1
  • I like your idea to use an "x" for multiplication. You could similarly use square brackets instead of parentheses to avoid the need for quoting. tr can be used to do character mapping for multiple characters. Commented Apr 16, 2014 at 19:58
3

If you like python and have an option to install a package, you can use this utility that I made.

# install pythonp
python -m pip install pythonp

pythonp "5*5"
25

pythonp "1 / (1+math.exp(0.5))"
0.3775406687981454

# define a custom function and pass it to another higher-order function
pythonp "n=10;functools.reduce(lambda x,y:x*y, range(1,n+1))"     
3628800

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