2

I'm new to jQuery and have noticed someone go:

var $this = $(this);

Why do this? Is it to save typing? Does it help performance? Is it fairly standard practice?

Also I've started doing things such as:

var minus_button = $('#minus_button');

Should this instead be var $minus_button = $('#minus_button'); to signal it's a jquery object?

I read http://docs.jquery.com/JQuery_Core_Style_Guidelines but couldn't find any suggestions.

6

Yes, it's a naming convention to signal that that variable is a jquery object reference. That way it is very obvious whether or not you can use a jquery function on the object or if the object needs to be converted into a jquery object to apply said function.

Example:

var element = document.getElementById('myelement');
var $element = $('#myelement');

// not a jquery object
console.log($(element).val());
// jquery object
console.log($element.val());
  • Ok thanks - as I thought then - nothing special. – robert king Jun 15 '12 at 2:00
  • Correct, nothing special just for readablility – Gabe Jun 15 '12 at 2:02
  • weird, i would have thought $(document.getElementById('z')) would be exactly the same as $('#z') – robert king Jun 15 '12 at 2:11
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    I am showing you that in order to use a jquery function you need to have a reference to jquery object first. So I do getElementId which returns me a DOM element. With the naming convention in question, i don't prefix the variable name with a $. So when I want to apply a jquery function later, I have to convert it into a jquery object. I was merely showing how the $ makes it more readable and when I went to apply a jquery function, I knew the element object was not a jquery object by the name of the object alone. – Gabe Jun 15 '12 at 2:29
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    Also it caches the element so you don't have to repeatedly go through the dom to find it. So if you have to repeatedly get an element it improve's performance – ᾠῗᵲᄐᶌ Jun 15 '12 at 2:37
1

It's just a form of Hungarian Notation.

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