72

How can I get a user-defined function to re-evaluate itself based on changed data in the spreadsheet?

I tried F9 and Shift+F9.

The only thing that seems to work is editing the cell with the function call and then pressing Enter.

125

You should use Application.Volatile in the top of your function:

Function doubleMe(d)
    Application.Volatile
    doubleMe = d * 2
End Function

It will then reevaluate whenever the workbook changes (if your calculation is set to automatic).

  • 18
    Thanks, just been bashing my head against a desk over this. Should point out though that in Excel 2010, you need to pass True to Application.Volatile, i.e. Application.Volatile True. – mdm Mar 31 '10 at 13:00
  • @mdm Thanks for the info on the True!! Needed this also for a custom worksheet function in Excel 2013!! – timbram Dec 11 '15 at 18:28
  • 2
    this works when I change the value of a cell, but I have a function that sums cells based on fill color and this doesn't update the function when I change the cell's fill color, I have to retype the value. can I have the worksheet live update as I change Fill Color? – Chris L Jun 28 '16 at 0:25
  • @ChrisL Did you find a solution for your use case with the calculation based on fill color? Appreciate your solution. – smartini May 30 '20 at 16:02
  • @smartini I never continued looking for a solution. I wasn't using my fill color function often enough for it to matter. I was hoping for a quick answer to my comment 4 years ago but it never came. Maybe best to start a new question. If you do, hit me up with a comment here so I can follow it. – Chris L May 30 '20 at 16:24
39

Some more information on the F9 keyboard shortcuts for calculation in Excel

  • F9 Recalculates all worksheets in all open workbooks
  • Shift+ F9 Recalculates the active worksheet
  • Ctrl+Alt+ F9 Recalculates all worksheets in all open workbooks (Full recalculation)
  • Shift + Ctrl+Alt+ F9 Rebuilds the dependency tree and does a full recalculation
16

Okay, found this one myself. You can use Ctrl+Alt+F9 to accomplish this.

  • This is your only option if you have Excel 2007 seeing as the Application.Volatile method was added in Office 2010. – I say Reinstate Monica Mar 12 '15 at 19:31
11

If you include ALL references to the spreadsheet data in the UDF parameter list, Excel will recalculate your function whenever the referenced data changes:

Public Function doubleMe(d As Variant)
    doubleMe = d * 2
End Function

You can also use Application.Volatile, but this has the disadvantage of making your UDF always recalculate - even when it does not need to because the referenced data has not changed.

Public Function doubleMe()
    Application.Volatile
    doubleMe = Worksheets("Fred").Range("A1") * 2
End Function
1

To switch to Automatic:

Application.Calculation = xlCalculationAutomatic    

To switch to Manual:

Application.Calculation = xlCalculationManual    
1

The Application.Volatile doesn't work for recalculating a formula with my own function inside. I use the following function: Application.CalculateFull

1

This refreshes the calculation better than Range(A:B).Calculate:

Public Sub UpdateMyFunctions()
    Dim myRange As Range
    Dim rng As Range

    ' Assume the functions are in this range A1:B10.
    Set myRange = ActiveSheet.Range("A1:B10")

    For Each rng In myRange
        rng.Formula = rng.Formula
    Next
End Sub
1

I found it best to only update the calculation when a specific cell is changed. Here is an example VBA code to place in the "Worksheet" "Change" event:

Private Sub Worksheet_Change(ByVal Target As Range)
  If Not Intersect(Target, Range("F3")) Is Nothing Then
    Application.CalculateFull
  End If
End Sub
0
Public Sub UpdateMyFunctions()
    Dim myRange As Range
    Dim rng As Range

    'Considering The Functions are in Range A1:B10
    Set myRange = ActiveSheet.Range("A1:B10")

    For Each rng In myRange
        rng.Formula = rng.Formula
    Next
End Sub
  • Please explain the code a bit. It would increase the usefullness quite a lot. – Trilarion Oct 22 '14 at 13:44
  • rng.Formula = rng.Formula is the same as entering a cell and pressing enter again. It forces Excel to calculate the cell again - including any custom functions. – Sam V Apr 6 '16 at 1:35

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