84

Previously, I had my LegNo enums defined simply as:

NO_LEG, LEG_ONE, LEG_TWO

and by calling return LegNo.values()[i];, I was able to get the value associated with each enum.

But now I've decided I want the LegNo enum NO_LEG to be the int -1 instead of 0 so I decided to use a private constructor to initialise and set its int value

NO_LEG(-1), LEG_ONE(1), LEG_TWO(2);

private LegNo(final int leg) { legNo = leg; }

the only thing now is that because I'm doing it this way the values() method will not work for the NO_LEG enum. How do I get the enum associated with the int? Is there any efficient way of doing this other than using a case switch statement or an if-elseif-elseif

I can see a lot of SO questions to do with getting the int value from the enum, but I'm after the reverse.

136

EDIT August 2018

Today I would implement this as follows

public enum LegNo {
    NO_LEG(-1), LEG_ONE(1), LEG_TWO(2);

    private final int value;

    LegNo(int value) {
        this.value = value;
    }

    public static Optional<LegNo> valueOf(int value) {
        return Arrays.stream(values())
            .filter(legNo -> legNo.value == value)
            .findFirst();
    }
}

You'll have to maintain a mapping inside the enum.

public enum LegNo {
    NO_LEG(-1), LEG_ONE(1), LEG_TWO(2);

    private int legNo;

    private static Map<Integer, LegNo> map = new HashMap<Integer, LegNo>();

    static {
        for (LegNo legEnum : LegNo.values()) {
            map.put(legEnum.legNo, legEnum);
        }
    }

    private LegNo(final int leg) { legNo = leg; }

    public static LegNo valueOf(int legNo) {
        return map.get(legNo);
    }
}

The static block will be invoked only once, so there is practically no performance issue here.

EDIT: Renamed the method to valueOf as it is more inline with other Java classes.

  • sorry im not sure if i was clear enough. i want to pass in the int and get the enum associated with it. – L-Samuels Jun 15 '12 at 9:18
  • @L-Samuels Guess I didn't read your question properly. See my update. – adarshr Jun 15 '12 at 9:22
  • 2
    I know this seems obvious, but use it like so: LegNo foo = LegNo.valueOf(2);. The previous code will return a LegNo.LEG_TWO. – FirstOne Nov 23 '17 at 11:52
  • 1
    To be noted, passing an invalid integer value (not mapped) will return null, as expected by using HashMap.get: Returns the value to which the specified key is mapped, or null if this map contains no mapping for the key. – FirstOne Nov 23 '17 at 11:53
  • While the stream syntax is neat, it worth pointing out that it has a higher time complexity than the static map (which admittedly has a higher memory consumption). Not an issue for 3 values, but definitely a concern if you're valueOf()'ing a 1000-member enum inside another loop. – Patrick M May 20 at 20:28
21

You could also include a static method in the enum that iterates through all members and returns the correct one.

public enum LegNo {
   NO_LEG(-1),
   LEG_ONE(1),
   LEG_TWO(2);

   private int legIndex;

   private LegNo(int legIndex) { this.legIndex = legIndex; }

   public static LegNo getLeg(int legIndex) {
      for (LegNo l : LegNo.values()) {
          if (l.legIndex == legIndex) return l;
      }
      throw new IllegalArgumentException("Leg not found. Amputated?");
   }
}

Now, if you want to get an Enum value by the integer, you just use:

int myLegIndex = 1; //expected : LEG_ONE
LegNo myLeg = LegNo.getLeg(myLegIndex);
  • I suppose this would more elegant than using an if else if statement. But given there were more enumsto search through then the map strategy suggested by @adarshr would be better. Although vote up for the humour. – L-Samuels Jun 15 '12 at 14:50
  • 1
    I like the map strategy a lot, too. Especially when the enum either has lots of values or it has to be looked up via this mechanism very often. However, if looking up values by the associated int is a relatively rare occurrence or you have a lot of different enums with the same lookup requirement, I believe my way would be more resource friendly, as the overhead for the map is saved. Plus, I find it makes for less cluttered code. I have a few use-cases where I will definitely switch to the Map-type myself, though. – Mike Adler Jun 15 '12 at 17:51
  • You should never derive an associated enum value by its ordinal. Using a static map IS the recommended methodology by Java architects. – hfontanez Dec 2 '16 at 15:03
  • The legIndex field coincides with the ordinal in this example, but can be any int value. No ordinal lookup is performed. Also, please give or link a reason why you think ordinal lookup is bad. – Mike Adler Dec 2 '16 at 18:36
  • "Leg not found. Amputated?" – Gnagy May 11 '17 at 8:52
16

adarshr's answer adapted to Java 8:

import static java.util.Arrays.stream;
import static java.util.stream.Collectors.toMap;

import java.util.Map;

public enum LegNo {
    NO_LEG(-1), LEG_ONE(1), LEG_TWO(2);

    private final int legNo;

    private final static Map<Integer, LegNo> map =
            stream(LegNo.values()).collect(toMap(leg -> leg.legNo, leg -> leg));

    private LegNo(final int leg) {
        legNo = leg;
    }

    public static LegNo valueOf(int legNo) {
        return map.get(legNo);
    }
}
10

You can also access Enum value corresponding to given integer value simply by calling values() method on enum LegNo. It returns field of LegNo enums: LegNo.values[0]; //returns LEG_NO LegNo.values[1]; //returns LEG_ONE LegNo.values[2]; //returns LEG_TWO

Not precisely the thing he was looking for, but pretty close though and very simple indeed. (Although the subject is dead it might be useful for someone else.)

6

Java 8 way with default value:

public enum LegNo {
    NO_LEG(-1), LEG_ONE(1), LEG_TWO(2);

    private final int legNo;

    LegNo(int legNo) {
        this.legNo = legNo;
    }

    public static LegNo find(int legNo, Supplier<? extends LegNo> byDef) {
        return Arrays.asList(LegNo.values()).stream()
                .filter(e -> e.legNo == legNo).findFirst().orElseGet(byDef);
    }
}

to call:

LegNo res = LegNo.find(0, () -> LegNo.NO_LEG);

or with Exception:

LegNo res = LegNo.find(0, () -> {
    throw new RuntimeException("No found");
});
1

Since your enum only contains 3 elements, the fastest way will be to just use a series of if else, like you suggested.

edit: the answer that adarshr provided is better suited for general cases, where there are many enum values, but I think it is an overkill for your problem.

  • Having a Map in your code is certainly not an overkill. Besides it makes the method a lot cleaner than a spaghetti of if-else conditions. – adarshr Jun 15 '12 at 9:34
  • I agree that the Map is better once you have a lot of enum values, but for 3 values I would stick to an if/else construct. It is a matter of taste I guess. – DieterDP Jun 15 '12 at 9:38
  • Whatever approach we choose, the method signature of public LegNo valueOf(int value) should not be changed. The if-else could then be written within the enum itself. If the if-else gets out of the enum, then it certainly becomes a not-so-clean code. – adarshr Jun 15 '12 at 9:40
  • 1
    I agree with you completely :) – DieterDP Jun 15 '12 at 9:45
0
public enum LegNo {
    NO_LEG(-1), LEG_ONE(1), LEG_TWO(2);

    private int legNo;

    private LegNo(int leg) { legNo = leg; }

    public static LegNo valueOf(int legNo) {
        for (LegNo leg : LegNo.values()) {
            if (leg.legNo == legNo) return leg;
        }   
    }
}

assert LegNo.valueOf(2) == LegNo.LEG_TWO
assert LegNo.valueOf(3) == null
  • 4
    Acceptable for enums with <10 values but totally ineffective for large number of enum values because of lookup complexity O(n) – Alfishe Dec 11 '14 at 1:56

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