181

How can this test fail?

[TestMethod]
public void Get_Code()
{
    var expected = new List<int>();
    expected.AddRange(new [] { 100, 400, 200, 900, 2300, 1900 });

    var actual = new List<int>();
    actual.AddRange(new [] { 100, 400, 200, 900, 2300, 1900 });

    Assert.AreEqual(expected, actual);
    // Assert.AreSame(expected, actual)       fails
    // Assert.IsTrue(expected.Equals(actual)) fails
}
371

To make assertions about collections, you should use CollectionAssert:

CollectionAssert.AreEqual(expected, actual);

List<T> doesn't override Equals, so if Assert.AreEqual just calls Equals, it will end up using reference equality.

| improve this answer | |
  • 6
    I wish this gave more detailed messages when it failed. "Different number of elements" and "Element at index 0 do not match" are slightly useless. What are they then?! – Colonel Panic May 15 '15 at 15:45
  • 32
    If you don't care about item order: {A,B,C} == {C,B,A}, then use CollectionAssert.AreEquivalent instead msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms243779.aspx – user2023861 Aug 11 '16 at 20:25
  • 2
    Note that CollectionAssert.AreEqual can be noticeably slower than Assert.IsTrue...SequenceEqual – Mark Sowul Oct 17 '16 at 16:04
  • 1
    @MarkSowul: But it comes with much better failure diagnostics, right? – Jon Skeet Oct 17 '16 at 16:28
  • 2
    @MarkSowul: Hmm... sounds like that's worth reporting as a bug then. No reason it should be that bad. – Jon Skeet Oct 17 '16 at 20:40
34

I guess this will help

Assert.IsTrue(expected.SequenceEqual(actual));
| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    That was my fall-back too, but I'd hope that CollectionAssert would provide more helpful failure messages. – Jon Skeet Jun 15 '12 at 17:48
  • 4
    Sadly, it doesn't really: "CollectionAssert.AreEqual failed. (Element at index 0 do not match.)" (what are the elements?) – namey Jun 4 '16 at 12:13
17

If you want to check that each contains the same collection of values then you should use:

CollectionAssert.AreEquivalent(expected, actual);

Edit:

"Two collections are equivalent if they have the same elements in the same quantity, but in any order. Elements are equal if their values are equal, not if they refer to the same object." - https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms243779.aspx

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14

I tried the other answers in this thread, and they didn't work for me and I was comparing collections of objects that had the same values stored in their properties, but the objects were different.

Method Call :

CompareIEnumerable(to, emailDeserialized.ToIndividual,
            (x, y) => x.ToName == y.ToName && x.ToEmailAddress == y.ToEmailAddress);

Method for comparisons:

private static void CompareIEnumerable<T>(IEnumerable<T> one, IEnumerable<T> two, Func<T, T, bool> comparisonFunction)
    {
        var oneArray = one as T[] ?? one.ToArray();
        var twoArray = two as T[] ?? two.ToArray();

        if (oneArray.Length != twoArray.Length)
        {
            Assert.Fail("Collections are not same length");
        }

        for (int i = 0; i < oneArray.Length; i++)
        {
            var isEqual = comparisonFunction(oneArray[i], twoArray[i]);
            Assert.IsTrue(isEqual);
        }
    }
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    Nice addition, or you can also override the Equals method and the CollectionAssert will work. – Ray Cheng Jul 15 '14 at 15:59
6

this test compares a date input, checks if its a leap year, if so, outputs 20 leap years from the inputted date, if not, outputs the NEXT 20 leap years, myTest.Testing refers to the myTest instance which in turn calls the values from a List called Testing containing the calculated values required. part of an exercise I had to do.

[TestMethod]
        public void TestMethod1()
        {
            int testVal = 2012;
            TestClass myTest = new TestClass();
            var expected = new List<int>();
            expected.Add(2012);
            expected.Add(2016);
            expected.Add(2020);
            expected.Add(2024);
            expected.Add(2028);
            expected.Add(2032);
            expected.Add(2036);
            expected.Add(2040);
            expected.Add(2044);
            expected.Add(2048);
            expected.Add(2052);
            expected.Add(2056);
            expected.Add(2060);
            expected.Add(2064);
            expected.Add(2068);
            expected.Add(2072);
            expected.Add(2076);
            expected.Add(2080);
            expected.Add(2084);
            expected.Add(2088);
            var actual = myTest.Testing(2012);
            CollectionAssert.AreEqual(expected, actual);
        }
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0
List<AdminUser> adminDetailsExpected = new List<AdminUser>()
{
new AdminUser  {firstName = "test1" , lastName = "test1" , userId = 
"001test1"  },
new AdminUser {firstName = "test2" , lastName = "test2" , userId = 
"002test2"   }
};

//Act

List<AdminUser> adminDetailsActual = RetrieveAdmin(); // your retrieve logic goes here

//Assert

Assert.AreEqual(adminDetailsExpected.Count, adminDetailsActual.Count);  //Test succeeds if the count matches else fails. This count can be used as a work around to test
| improve this answer | |
0

Fluent assertions does deep comparisons of arrays actualArray.Should().BeEquivalentTo(expectedArray)

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