43

I made 2 projects, the first one in C and the second one in C++, both work with same behavior.

C project:

header.h

int varGlobal=7;

main.c

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include "header.h"

void function(int i)
{
    static int a=0;
    a++;
    int t=i;
    i=varGlobal;
    varGlobal=t;
    printf("Call #%d:\ni=%d\nvarGlobal=%d\n\n",a,i,varGlobal,t);
}

int main() {
    function(4);
    function(6);
    function(12);
    return 0;
}

C++ project:

header.h

int varGlobal=7;

main.cpp

#include <iostream>
#include "header.h"
using namespace std;

void function(int i)
{
    static int a=0;
    int t=i;
    a++;
    i=varGlobal;
    varGlobal=t;
    cout<<"Call #"<<a<<":"<<endl<<"i="<<i<<endl<<"varGlobal="<<varGlobal<<endl<<endl; 
}

int main() {
    function(4);
    function(6);
    function(12);
    return 0;
}

I read that global variables are extern by default and in C and static by default in C++; so why does the C++ code works?

I mean int varGlobal=7; is same as static int varGlobal=7; and if it's static then it can be used only in the file it was declared, right?

1
  • First note that include simply copy-pastes content. So for such single file example, it should be removed to simplify. Jun 19, 2015 at 8:26

2 Answers 2

105

Global variables are not extern nor static by default on C and C++. When you declare a variable as static, you are restricting it to the current source file. If you declare it as extern, you are saying that the variable exists, but are defined somewhere else, and if you don't have it defined elsewhere (without the extern keyword) you will get a link error (symbol not found).

Your code will break when you have more source files including that header, on link time you will have multiple references to varGlobal. If you declare it as static, then it will work with multiple sources (I mean, it will compile and link), but each source will have its own varGlobal.

What you can do in C++, that you can't in C, is to declare the variable as const on the header, like this:

const int varGlobal = 7;

And include in multiple sources, without breaking things at link time. The idea is to replace the old C style #define for constants.

If you need a global variable visible on multiple sources and not const, declare it as extern on the header, and then define it, this time without the extern keyword, on a source file:

Header included by multiple files:

extern int varGlobal;

In one of your source files:

int varGlobal = 7;
11
  • 3
    As I just discovered, there is a difference between C and C++ but it only applies to const objects: publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/lnxpcomp/v8v101/… Jun 15, 2012 at 18:38
  • If you are going to put things in headers, some compilers/linkers will complain about multiply defined symbols. Example: const int varGlobal=7; Because you are declaring it const it can be treated as a global constant, but some compilers are not that smart. What does work, always, is to declare things static const in the header file, like so: static const int varGlobal = 7; That way even if the compiler is stupid, it won't add the symbol to the external symbols table and the linker will never see multiply defined symbols.
    – steveha
    Jun 18, 2012 at 22:39
  • 1
    @fbafelipe That's right. I forgot about it because there is usually a way to disable the warnings and I always use it. For example, with GCC you can use __attribute__ ((unused)) to disable that warning. So I don't actually declare things static const, I declare them LIBCONST where LIBCONST is a #define macro I have made that declares static __attribute__ ((unused)) for GCC, and just static for other platforms that don't warn.
    – steveha
    Jun 19, 2012 at 1:01
  • 3
    @lmiguelvargasf If you want to initialize with a value, initialize in the c/cpp file, not the header. So in the header you have extern int x; and in the source file you have int x = 10;
    – fbafelipe
    Apr 22, 2016 at 5:01
  • 2
    From C++11 on you usually use constexpr int constGlobal = 7; to replace an old style #define constGlobal = 7. It is guaranteed to be a compile time constant (and can be used as template parameter, etc.), but still type safe.
    – John
    Nov 21, 2016 at 7:48
9

When you #include a header, it's exactly as if you put the code into the source file itself. In both cases the varGlobal variable is defined in the source so it will work no matter how it's declared.

Also as pointed out in the comments, C++ variables at file scope are not static in scope even though they will be assigned to static storage. If the variable were a class member for example, it would need to be accessible to other compilation units in the program by default and non-class members are no different.

3
  • 3
    Also, the OP is incorrect in the assumption that globally declared variable are static by default in C++. They have external linkage, just as in C. Global variables have static duration in C and C++ though, so this can easily be confusing.
    – nos
    Jun 15, 2012 at 17:57
  • So the rule appllies for *.c an *.cpp files but not for *.h files? Thank you!
    – Cristi
    Jun 15, 2012 at 17:59
  • Another important thing: his code would break if he had multiple sources including that same header.
    – fbafelipe
    Jun 15, 2012 at 18:21

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