1

If you had a form where you in put hex colour codes

FFFFFF

how would you determine their hue? Like Cyan, Orange, etc...?

So if someone typed in

#FF8000

The hue would be printed on the page saying Orange.

If possible, could you also explain how this works? Or link me to something that explains it?

Would it be plausible to enter this code inside of my main python script to be able to convert to HSV?

        #RGB to HSV start
    ONE_THIRD = 1.0/3.0
    ONE_SIXTH = 1.0/6.0
    TWO_THIRD = 2.0/3.0
    def rgb_to_hsv(r, g, b):
        maxc = max(r, g, b)
        minc = min(r, g, b)
        v = maxc
        if minc == maxc:
            return 0.0, 0.0, v
            s = (maxc-minc) / maxc
            rc = (maxc-r) / (maxc-minc)
            gc = (maxc-g) / (maxc-minc)
            bc = (maxc-b) / (maxc-minc)
        if r == maxc:
            h = bc-gc
        elif g == maxc:
            h = 2.0+rc-bc
        else:
            h = 4.0+gc-rc
            h = (h/6.0) % 1.0
            return h, s, v

    #RGB to HSV end
6
  • 3
    Check this out: stackoverflow.com/questions/2453344/…
    – wquist
    Jun 16, 2012 at 2:14
  • My understanding is that you want a mapping from hex codes to descriptive color terms, is that correct, or am I misunderstanding what you are trying to do?
    – Levon
    Jun 16, 2012 at 2:40
  • Please see my comment below. There's no reason you couldn't put a function from a library directly in your code, but why would you when you can just import the library and call it as I've shown you below? Much cleaner.
    – Dan
    Jun 16, 2012 at 2:42
  • @user37078 Just so I can pinpoint and find out what each thing does. If I imported a file, I would have to read the two files side by side. And I would not be converting into any other value listed in there. Just making it easy on myself I guess.
    – Aj Entity
    Jun 16, 2012 at 2:45
  • @Levon Yes, pretty much. Only thing is, I just want the basic ones. I already have Red, Green, and Blue understood. I am just trying to pinpoint when a red is not a red anymore if you add green, and that it becomes an "orange-ish" colour. Same with blue. If you add enough red, but not too much, it will become a magenta. Or if you get a good balance, it will be purple. I just want to point those things out. The basic colours such as Yellow, Orange, Magenta, Purple, Cyan, etc...
    – Aj Entity
    Jun 16, 2012 at 2:48

3 Answers 3

3

Please see colorsys.

Basically, it works like this:

>>> import colorsys
>>> colorsys.rgb_to_hsv(.3, .4, .2)
(0.25, 0.5, 0.4)
9
  • Would it be plausible to just put this code inside the individual python script instead?
    – Aj Entity
    Jun 16, 2012 at 2:31
  • That looks messy, I will edit the code inside my original question.
    – Aj Entity
    Jun 16, 2012 at 2:33
  • It's hard to read a big code dump in a comment, but it looks like you're trying to make a function that pretty much does the same thing as an included python library. Why would you bother?
    – Dan
    Jun 16, 2012 at 2:36
  • Just so I can pinpoint and find out what each thing does. If I imported a file, I would have to read the two files side by side. And I would not be converting into any other value listed in there. Just making it easy on myself I guess.
    – Aj Entity
    Jun 16, 2012 at 2:40
  • What are you trying to do exactly? Are you new to python and programming in general? My advice would be to get accustomed to having code in different files, it's a practical necessity in the life of a programmer.
    – Dan
    Jun 16, 2012 at 2:46
1

I'm not sure there's an easy algorithmic way to solve this to come up with accurate and descriptive color designations. I think some sort of look-up would be required.

Unless you have access to a database of hex codes/descriptions already, one approach would be using a dictionary where your keys would be your hex codes, and the values would be the corresponding descriptions is one way to go. You could look up the hex code and display the corresponding color description.

You could find the values for your dictionary from any number of web pages that specialize on that sort type of color information such as Hexadecimal Color Code Chips Table (Hue at 10° of separation) or this Hexadecimal Color Codes

Though given the large number of hex codes, I'm not sure how feasible it would be for you to build this yourself from scratch.

3
  • Well, if you are asking am I already able to describe FF0000 as red, or FFFF00 as yellow, then yes. I do have that.
    – Aj Entity
    Jun 16, 2012 at 2:33
  • @AjEntity Yes, the basic colors will be easy, I think the tricky part would be the various grades/hues of colors, no?
    – Levon
    Jun 16, 2012 at 2:36
  • Yes. The grades/hues is what stumped me for the last 3 days. But I was just asking to make sure what the question was.
    – Aj Entity
    Jun 16, 2012 at 2:44
1

using the file webcolors.txt in Tools\pynche you can create your own function which will return the color name of passed hex value:

with open ('Tools\pynche\webcolors.txt') as f:
      color_dict={x.split()[1].strip():x.split()[0].strip() for x in f.readlines()[1:]}

color_dict['fetch']=lambda x:color_dict.get(x.lower(),'color not found')


print( color_dict['fetch']('#ffFF00') )
print( color_dict['fetch']('#AAdd00') )
print(color_dict['fetch']('#FFFFFF'))

output:

Yellow
color not found
White

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