58

I need to calculate the number of FULL month in SQL, i.e.

  • 2009-04-16 to 2009-05-15 => 0 full month
  • 2009-04-16 to 2009-05-16 => 1 full month
  • 2009-04-16 to 2009-06-16 => 2 full months

I tried to use DATEDIFF, i.e.

SELECT DATEDIFF(MONTH, '2009-04-16', '2009-05-15')

but instead of giving me full months between the two date, it gives me the difference of the month part, i.e.

1

anyone know how to calculate the number of full months in SQL Server?

1
  • 7
    2009-01-31 to 2009-02-28. Is that 0 or 1 full month? Jul 9 '09 at 23:26

21 Answers 21

55

The original post had some bugs... so I re-wrote and packaged it as a UDF.

CREATE FUNCTION FullMonthsSeparation 
(
    @DateA DATETIME,
    @DateB DATETIME
)
RETURNS INT
AS
BEGIN
    DECLARE @Result INT

    DECLARE @DateX DATETIME
    DECLARE @DateY DATETIME

    IF(@DateA < @DateB)
    BEGIN
        SET @DateX = @DateA
        SET @DateY = @DateB
    END
    ELSE
    BEGIN
        SET @DateX = @DateB
        SET @DateY = @DateA
    END

    SET @Result = (
                    SELECT 
                    CASE 
                        WHEN DATEPART(DAY, @DateX) > DATEPART(DAY, @DateY)
                        THEN DATEDIFF(MONTH, @DateX, @DateY) - 1
                        ELSE DATEDIFF(MONTH, @DateX, @DateY)
                    END
                    )

    RETURN @Result
END
GO

SELECT dbo.FullMonthsSeparation('2009-04-16', '2009-05-15') as MonthSep -- =0
SELECT dbo.FullMonthsSeparation('2009-04-16', '2009-05-16') as MonthSep -- =1
SELECT dbo.FullMonthsSeparation('2009-04-16', '2009-06-16') as MonthSep -- =2
6
  • 4
    Yeah I know this answer is over 5 years old now but I came across it when googling. There's only one problem with this, it falls down when comparing the end day of a month. FullMonthsSeparation('2012-12-31', '2013-02-28') returns 1, not 2.
    – Hugo Yates
    Jan 12 '15 at 16:08
  • 3
    That is the behavior the OP asked for.
    – Barett
    Jun 5 '15 at 21:14
  • Is not necesary to create the function only the @result part. For example: Select Name, (SELECT CASE WHEN DATEPART(DAY, '2016-08-28') > DATEPART(DAY, '2016-09-29') THEN DATEDIFF(MONTH, '2016-08-28', '2016-09-29') - 1 ELSE DATEDIFF(MONTH, '2016-08-28', '2016-09-29') END) as NumberOfMonths FROM tableExample;
    – Adrian
    Sep 28 '16 at 9:05
  • @Barett Then how to change the function to return FullMonthSeparation('2012-12-31','2013'-2-28') return 2, not 1? Dec 23 '19 at 9:10
  • 3
    this get wrong result between 2019-01-31 and 2019-02-28. answer should be 1. but this function returrn 0 Jan 6 '20 at 11:34
6
select case when DATEPART(D,End_dATE) >=DATEPART(D,sTAR_dATE) 
THEN ( case when DATEPART(M,End_dATE) = DATEPART(M,sTAR_dATE) AND DATEPART(YYYY,End_dATE) = DATEPART(YYYY,sTAR_dATE) 
        THEN 0 ELSE DATEDIFF(M,sTAR_dATE,End_dATE)END )
ELSE DATEDIFF(M,sTAR_dATE,End_dATE)-1 END
5

What's your definition of a month? Technically a month can be 28,29,30 or 31 days depending on the month and leap years.

It seems you're considering a month to be 30 days since in your example you disregarded that May has 31 days, so why not just do the following?

SELECT DATEDIFF(DAY, '2009-04-16', '2009-05-15')/30
    , DATEDIFF(DAY, '2009-04-16', '2009-05-16')/30
    , DATEDIFF(DAY, '2009-04-16', '2009-06-16')/30
2
  • 1
    I think the question the OP wants to answer is: "how many times can I increment the 'month' of the first date before it passes the second?" (with appropriate handling of years)
    – John Fouhy
    Jul 10 '09 at 0:51
  • 1
    the fact that the OP "disregarded that May has 31 days" shows that he did not consider a month to be 30 days
    – chiccodoro
    Mar 11 '14 at 10:23
5

This is for ORACLE only and not for SQL-Server:

months_between(to_date ('2009/05/15', 'yyyy/mm/dd'), 
               to_date ('2009/04/16', 'yyyy/mm/dd'))

And for full month:

round(months_between(to_date ('2009/05/15', 'yyyy/mm/dd'), 
                     to_date ('2009/04/16', 'yyyy/mm/dd')))

Can be used in Oracle 8i and above.

5

The dateadd function can be used to offset to the beginning of the month. If the endDate has a day part less than startDate, it will get pushed to the previous month, thus datediff will give the correct number of months.

DATEDIFF(MONTH, DATEADD(DAY,-DAY(startDate)+1,startDate),DATEADD(DAY,-DAY(startDate)+1,endDate))
2
  • While this code may answer the question, it would be better to explain how it solves the problem without introducing others and why to use it. Code-only answers are not useful in the long run.
    – JAL
    Nov 11 '15 at 18:42
  • This does not seem to work for start date of '1/31/2018' and endDate of '3/1/2018', I get a 0
    – Eugene
    Jan 13 '19 at 21:58
0

DATEDIFF() is designed to return the number boundaries crossed between the two dates for the span specified. To get it to do what you want, you need to make an additional adjustment to account for when the dates cross a boundary but don't complete the full span.

0
WITH   
-- Count how many months must be added to @StartDate to exceed @DueDate  
MONTHS_SINCE(n, [Month_hence], [IsFull], [RemainingDays] ) AS (  
SELECT   
    1 as n,  
    DATEADD(Day, -1, DATEADD(Month, 1, @StartDate)) AS Month_hence  
    ,CASE WHEN (DATEADD(Day, -1, DATEADD(Month, 1, @StartDate)) <= @LastDueDate)   
        THEN 1   
        ELSE 0   
    END  AS [IsFull]  
    ,DATEDIFF(day, @StartDate,  @LastDueDate) as [RemainingDays]  
UNION ALL  
SELECT  
    n+1,  
    --DateAdd(Month, 1, Month_hence) as Month_hence -- No, causes propagation of short month discounted days  
    DATEADD(Day, -1, DATEADD(Month, n+1, @StartDate)) as Month_hence  
    ,CASE WHEN (DATEADD(Day, -1, DATEADD(Month, n+1, @StartDate)) <= @LastDueDate)   
        THEN 1   
        ELSE 0    
    END  AS [IsFull]  
    ,DATEDIFF(day, DATEADD(Day, -1, DATEADD(Month, n, @StartDate)),  @LastDueDate)  
    FROM MONTHS_SINCE   
    WHERE Month_hence<( @LastDueDate --WHERE Period= 1  
    )  
), --SELECT * FROM MONTHS_SINCE  
MONTH_TALLY (full_months_over_all_terms, months_over_all_terms, days_in_incomplete_month ) AS (  
SELECT  
    COALESCE((SELECT MAX(n) FROM MONTHS_SINCE WHERE isFull = 1),1) as full_months_over_all_terms,  
    (SELECT MAX(n) FROM MONTHS_SINCE ) as months_over_all_terms,  
    COALESCE((SELECT [RemainingDays] FROM MONTHS_SINCE WHERE isFull = 0),0) as days_in_incomplete_month  
) SELECT * FROM MONTH_TALLY;   
0
0

Is not necesary to create the function only the @result part. For example:

Select Name,
(SELECT CASE WHEN 
DATEPART(DAY, '2016-08-28') > DATEPART(DAY, '2016-09-29')   
THEN DATEDIFF(MONTH, '2016-08-28',  '2016-09-29') - 1
ELSE DATEDIFF(MONTH, '2016-08-28',  '2016-09-29') END) as NumberOfMonths

FROM 
tableExample;
0

This answer follows T-SQL format. I conceptualize this problem as one of a linear-time distance between two date points in datetime format, call them Time1 and Time2; Time1 should be aligned to the 'older in time' value you are dealing with (say a Birth date or a widget Creation date or a journey Start date) and Time2 should be aligned with the 'newer in time' value (say a snapshot date or a widget completion date or a journey checkpoint-reached date).

DECLARE @Time1 DATETIME
SET @Time1 = '12/14/2015'

DECLARE @Time2 DATETIME
SET @Time2 = '12/15/2016'

The solution leverages simple measurement, conversion and calculations of the serial intersections of multiple cycles of different lengths; here: Century,Decade,Year,Month,Day (Thanks Mayan Calendar for the concept!). A quick note of thanks: I thank other contributors to Stack Overflow for showing me some of the component functions in this process that I've stitched together. I've positively rated these in my time on this forum.

First, construct a horizon that is the linear set of the intersections of the Century,Decade,Year,Month cycles, incremental by month. Use the cross join Cartesian function for this. (Think of this as creating the cloth from which we will cut a length between two 'yyyy-mm' points in order to measure distance):

SELECT 
Linear_YearMonths = (centuries.century + decades.decade + years.[year] + months.[Month]),
1 AS value
INTO #linear_months
FROM
(SELECT '18' [century] UNION ALL
SELECT '19' UNION ALL
SELECT '20') centuries 
CROSS JOIN 
(SELECT '0' [decade] UNION ALL
SELECT '1' UNION ALL
SELECT '2' UNION ALL
SELECT '3' UNION ALL
SELECT '4' UNION ALL
SELECT '5' UNION ALL
SELECT '6' UNION ALL
SELECT '7' UNION ALL
SELECT '8' UNION ALL
SELECT '9') decades 
CROSS JOIN 
(SELECT '1' [year] UNION ALL
SELECT '2' UNION ALL
SELECT '3' UNION ALL
SELECT '4' UNION ALL
SELECT '5' UNION ALL
SELECT '6' UNION ALL
SELECT '7' UNION ALL
SELECT '8' UNION ALL
SELECT '9' UNION ALL
SELECT '0') years 
CROSS JOIN  
(SELECT '-01' [month] UNION ALL
SELECT '-02' UNION ALL
SELECT '-03' UNION ALL
SELECT '-04' UNION ALL
SELECT '-05' UNION ALL
SELECT '-06' UNION ALL
SELECT '-07' UNION ALL
SELECT '-08' UNION ALL
SELECT '-09' UNION ALL
SELECT '-10' UNION ALL
SELECT '-11' UNION ALL
SELECT '-12') [months]
ORDER BY 1

Then, convert your Time1 and Time2 date points into the 'yyyy-mm' format (Think of these as the coordinate cut points on the whole cloth). Retain the original datetime versions of the points as well:

SELECT
Time1 = @Time1,
[YYYY-MM of Time1] = CASE
WHEN LEFT(MONTH(@Time1),1) <> '1' OR MONTH(@Time1) = '1'
    THEN (CAST(YEAR(@Time1) AS VARCHAR) + '-' + '0' + CAST(MONTH(@Time1) AS VARCHAR))
    ELSE (CAST(YEAR(@Time1) AS VARCHAR) + '-' + CAST(MONTH(@Time1) AS VARCHAR))
    END,
Time2 = @Time2,
[YYYY-MM of Time2] = CASE
WHEN LEFT(MONTH(@Time2),1) <> '1' OR MONTH(@Time2) = '1'
    THEN (CAST(YEAR(@Time2) AS VARCHAR) + '-' + '0' + CAST(MONTH(@Time2) AS VARCHAR))
    ELSE (CAST(YEAR(@Time2) AS VARCHAR) + '-' + CAST(MONTH(@Time2) AS VARCHAR))
    END
INTO #datepoints

Then, Select the ordinal distance of 'yyyy-mm' units, less one to convert to cardinal distance (i.e. cut a piece of cloth from the whole cloth at the identified cut points and get its raw measurement):

SELECT 
d.*,
Months_Between = (SELECT (SUM(l.value) - 1) FROM #linear_months l
            WHERE l.[Linear_YearMonths] BETWEEN d.[YYYY-MM of Time1] AND d.[YYYY-MM of Time2])
FROM #datepoints d

Raw Output: I call this a 'raw distance' because the month component of the 'yyyy-mm' cardinal distance may be one too many; the day cycle components within the month need to be compared to see if this last month value should count. In this example specifically, the raw output distance is '12'. But this wrong as 12/14 is before 12/15, so therefore only 11 full months have lapsed--its just one day shy of lapsing through the 12th month. We therefore have to bring in the intra-month day cycle to get to a final answer. Insert a 'month,day' position comparison between the to determine if the latest date point month counts nominally, or not:

SELECT 
d.*,
Months_Between = (SELECT (SUM(l.value) - 1) FROM AZ_VBP.[MY].[edg_Linear_YearMonths] l
            WHERE l.[Linear_YearMonths] BETWEEN d.[YYYY-MM of Time1] AND d.[YYYY-MM of Time2])
        + (CASE WHEN DAY(Time1) < DAY(Time2)
                THEN -1
                ELSE 0
                END)
FROM #datepoints d

Final Output: The correct answer of '11' is now our output. And so, I hope this helps. Thanks!

0
select CAST(DATEDIFF(MONTH, StartDate, EndDate) AS float) -
  (DATEPART(dd,StartDate) - 1.0) / DATEDIFF(DAY, StartDate, DATEADD(MONTH, 1, StartDate)) +
  (DATEPART(dd,EndDate)*1.0 ) / DATEDIFF(DAY, EndDate, DATEADD(MONTH, 1, EndDate))
0

I realize this is an old post, but I created this interesting solution that I think is easy to implement using a CASE statement.

Estimate the difference using DATEDIFF, and then test the months before and after using DATEADD to find the best date. This assumes Jan 31 to Feb 28 is 1 month (because it is).

DECLARE @First date = '2015-08-31'
DECLARE @Last date = '2016-02-28'

SELECT
    @First as [First],
    @Last as [Last],
    DateDiff(Month, @First, @Last) as [DateDiff Thinks],
    CASE
        WHEN DATEADD(Month, DATEDIFF(Month, @First, @Last) +1, @First) <= @Last Then DATEDIFF(Month, @First, @Last) +1
        WHEN DATEADD(Month, DATEDIFF(Month, @First, @Last) , @First) <= @Last Then DATEDIFF(Month, @First, @Last) 
        WHEN DATEADD(Month, DATEDIFF(Month, @First, @Last) -1, @First) <= @Last Then DATEDIFF(Month, @First, @Last) -1
    END as [Actual Months Apart]
2
  • "and then test the months before and after using DATEADD to find the best date.", I cannot understand what is to find the "best date"? Dec 23 '19 at 9:26
  • if startdate = 2020-01-31 and enddae = 2020-01-30, this return -1 although just 1 day different Dec 23 '19 at 9:29
0

SIMPLE AND EASY WAY, Just Copy and Paste this FULL code to MS SQL and Execute :

declare @StartDate date='2019-01-31'
declare @EndDate date='2019-02-28'


SELECT

DATEDIFF(MONTH, @StartDate, @EndDate)+

(

case 

when format(@StartDate,'yyyy-MM') != format(@EndDate,'yyyy-MM') AND DATEPART(DAY,@StartDate) > DATEPART(DAY,@EndDate) AND DATEPART(DAY,@EndDate) = DATEPART(DAY,EOMONTH(@EndDate)) then 0

when format(@StartDate,'yyyy-MM') != format(@EndDate,'yyyy-MM') AND DATEPART(DAY,@StartDate) > DATEPART(DAY,@EndDate)  then -1 

else 0 

end

) 

as NumberOfMonths
0

All you need to do is deduct the additional month if the end date has not yet passed the day of the month in the start date.

DECLARE @StartDate AS DATE = '2019-07-17'
DECLARE @EndDate AS DATE = '2019-09-15'


DECLARE @MonthDiff AS INT = DATEDIFF(MONTH,@StartDate,@EndDate)

SELECT @MonthDiff - 
        CASE 
            WHEN FORMAT(@StartDate,'dd') > FORMAT(@EndDate,'dd') THEN 1
            ELSE 0
        END
0

You can create this function to calculate absolute difference between two dates. As I found using DATEDIFF inbuilt system function we will get the difference only in months, days and years. For example : Let say there are two dates 18-Jan-2018 and 15-Jan-2019. So the difference between those dates will be given by DATEDIFF in month as 12 months where as it is actually 11 Months 28 Days. So using the function given below, we can find absolute difference between two dates.

CREATE FUNCTION GetDurationInMonthAndDays(@First_Date DateTime,@Second_Date DateTime)

RETURNS VARCHAR(500)

AS

BEGIN

    DECLARE @RESULT VARCHAR(500)=''



    DECLARE @MONTHS TABLE(MONTH_ID INT,MONTH_NAME VARCHAR(100),MONTH_DAYS INT)

    INSERT INTO @MONTHS

    SELECT 1,'Jan',31

    union SELECT 2,'Feb',28

    union SELECT 3,'Mar',31

    union SELECT 4,'Apr',30

    union SELECT 5,'May',31

    union SELECT 6,'Jun',30

    union SELECT 7,'Jul',31

    union SELECT 8,'Aug',31

    union SELECT 9,'Sep',30

    union SELECT 10,'Oct',31

    union SELECT 11,'Nov',30

    union SELECT 12,'Jan',31



    IF(@Second_Date>@First_Date)

    BEGIN



            declare @month int=0

            declare @days int=0



            declare @first_year int

            declare @second_year int



            SELECT @first_year=Year(@First_Date)

            SELECT @second_year=Year(@Second_Date)+1



            declare @first_month int

            declare @second_month int



            SELECT @first_month=Month(@First_Date)

            SELECT @second_month=Month(@Second_Date)    



            if(@first_month=2)

            begin

                   IF((@first_year%100<>0) AND (@first_year%4=0) OR (@first_year%400=0))

                     BEGIN

                      SELECT @days=29-day(@First_Date) 

                     END

                   else

                     begin

                      SELECT @days=28-day(@First_Date) 

                     end

            end

            else

            begin

              SELECT @days=(SELECT MONTH_DAYS FROM @MONTHS WHERE MONTH_ID=@first_month)-day(@First_Date) 

            end



            SELECT @first_month=@first_month+1



            WHILE @first_year<@second_year

            BEGIN

               if(@first_month=13)

               begin

                set @first_month=1

               end

               WHILE @first_month<13

               BEGIN

                   if(@first_year=Year(@Second_Date))

                   begin

                    if(@first_month=@second_month)

                    begin           

                     SELECT @days=@days+DAY(@Second_Date)

                     break;

                    end

                    else

                    begin

                     SELECT @month=@month+1

                    end

                   end

                   ELSE

                   BEGIN

                    SELECT @month=@month+1

                   END      

                SET @first_month=@first_month+1

               END



            SET @first_year  = @first_year  + 1

            END



            select @month=@month+(@days/30)

            select @days=@days%30



            if(@days>0)

            begin

             SELECT @RESULT=CAST(@month AS VARCHAR)+' Month '+CAST(@days AS VARCHAR)+' Days '

            end

            else 

            begin

             SELECT @RESULT=CAST(@month AS VARCHAR)+' Month '

            end

        END



        ELSE

        BEGIN

           SELECT @RESULT='ERROR'

        END





    RETURN @RESULT 

END
0
SELECT dateadd(dd,number,DATEADD(yy, DATEDIFF(yy,0,getdate()), 0)) AS gun FROM master..spt_values
WHERE type = 'p'
AND year(dateadd(dd,number,DATEADD(yy, DATEDIFF(yy,0,getdate()), 0)))=year(DATEADD(yy, DATEDIFF(yy,0,getdate()), 0))
1
  • 2
    Can you add a small explanation ? Jun 26 '20 at 8:22
0
CREATE FUNCTION ufFullMonthDif (@dStart DATE, @dEnd DATE)
RETURNS INT
AS
BEGIN
    DECLARE @dif INT,
            @dEnd2 DATE
    SET @dif = DATEDIFF(MONTH, @dStart, @dEnd)
    SET @dEnd2 = DATEADD (MONTH, @dif, @dStart)
    IF @dEnd2 > @dEnd
        SET @dif = @dif - 1
    RETURN @dif
END
GO

SELECT dbo.ufFullMonthDif ('2009-04-30', '2009-05-01')
SELECT dbo.ufFullMonthDif ('2009-04-30', '2009-05-29')
SELECT dbo.ufFullMonthDif ('2009-04-30', '2009-05-30')
SELECT dbo.ufFullMonthDif ('2009-04-16', '2009-05-15')
SELECT dbo.ufFullMonthDif ('2009-04-16', '2009-05-16')
SELECT dbo.ufFullMonthDif ('2009-04-16', '2009-06-16')
SELECT dbo.ufFullMonthDif ('2019-01-31', '2019-02-28')
0

I know this is an old question, but as long as the dates are >= 01-Jan-1753 I use:

DATEDIFF(MONTH, DATEADD(DAY,-DAY(@Start)+1,@Start),DATEADD(DAY,-DAY(@Start)+1,@End))
0

Making Some changes to the Above function worked for me.

CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[FullMonthsSeparation] ( @DateA DATETIME, @DateB DATETIME ) RETURNS INT AS BEGIN DECLARE @Result INT

DECLARE @DateX DATETIME
DECLARE @DateY DATETIME

IF(@DateA < @DateB)
BEGIN
    SET @DateX = @DateA
    SET @DateY = @DateB
END
ELSE
BEGIN
    SET @DateX = @DateB
    SET @DateY = @DateA
END

SET @Result = (
                SELECT 
                CASE 
                    WHEN DATEPART(DAY, @DateX) > DATEPART(DAY, @DateY)
                    THEN DATEDIFF(MONTH, @DateX, @DateY) - iif(EOMONTH(@DateY) = @DateY, 0, 1)
                    ELSE DATEDIFF(MONTH, @DateX, @DateY)
                END
                )

RETURN @Result

END

-1
SELECT 12 * (YEAR(end_date) - YEAR(start_date)) +
    ((MONTH(end_date) - MONTH(start_date))) +
    SIGN(DAY(end_date) / DAY(start_date));

This works fine for me on SQL SERVER 2000.

2
  • (MS-SQL 2014) For 2009-04-16 to 2009-05-15 this returns 1 instead of 0. For 2009-04-16 to 2009-05-16 this returns 2 instead of 1. For 2009-04-16 to 2009-06-16 this returns 3 instead of 2. I am amazed that there is such a difference between SQL 2000 & 2014
    – brewmanz
    Dec 4 '16 at 19:04
  • this will not working for all scenarios. Number of month between 2019-01-31 and 2019-03-01. Answer should be - 1. but this return 2 Jan 7 '20 at 8:42
-1

Try:

trunc(Months_Between(date2, date1))
1
  • 2
    what rdbms uses trunc(), not sql-server?
    – Taryn
    Feb 16 '12 at 21:24
-2

I googled over internet. And suggestion I found is to add +1 to the end.

Try do it like this:

Declare @Start DateTime
Declare @End DateTime

Set @Start = '11/1/07'
Set @End = '2/29/08'

Select DateDiff(Month, @Start, @End + 1)
1
  • That won't work for the a lot of cases, check it on his first one. Jul 9 '09 at 23:49

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