I have tried reading some articles, but I am not very clear on the concepts yet.

Would someone like to take a shot at explaining to me what these technologies are:

  1. Long Polling
  2. Server-Sent Events
  3. Websockets
  4. Comet

One thing that I came across every time was, the server keeps a connection open and pushes data to the client. How is the connection kept open, and how does the client get the pushed data? (How does the client use the data, maybe some code might help?)

Now, which one of them should I use for a real-time app. I have been hearing a lot about websockets (with socket.io [a node.js library]) but why not PHP?

  • 1
    Realtime websocket or webrtc? There is a library for websocket in php, you do need to write extra code in order for it to work using ZMQ or just socket programming, nodeJs is built for this so its easily available. The reason websocket is not readily available in php is that you have to run an extra terminal and kept it running so that websocket server is readily available, you will have two servers bottom line. and the structure, php is not an event structure like javascript so there's that, websocket uses a event structure in order to catch and send messages. – PauAI Apr 11 '17 at 0:31
  • Additionally: Comet and ServerSent Events are PHP's workaround of achieving almost realtime(not really) without creating 2 servers. – PauAI Apr 11 '17 at 0:49
up vote 1883 down vote accepted

In the examples below the client is the browser and the server is the webserver hosting the website.

Before you can understand these technologies, you have to understand classic HTTP web traffic first.

Regular HTTP:

  1. A client requests a webpage from a server.
  2. The server calculates the response
  3. The server sends the response to the client.

HTTP

Ajax Polling:

  1. A client requests a webpage from a server using regular HTTP (see HTTP above).
  2. The client receives the requested webpage and executes the JavaScript on the page which requests a file from the server at regular intervals (e.g. 0.5 seconds).
  3. The server calculates each response and sends it back, just like normal HTTP traffic.

Ajax Polling

Ajax Long-Polling:

  1. A client requests a webpage from a server using regular HTTP (see HTTP above).
  2. The client receives the requested webpage and executes the JavaScript on the page which requests a file from the server.
  3. The server does not immediately respond with the requested information but waits until there's new information available.
  4. When there's new information available, the server responds with the new information.
  5. The client receives the new information and immediately sends another request to the server, re-starting the process.

Ajax Long-Polling

HTML5 Server Sent Events (SSE) / EventSource:

  1. A client requests a webpage from a server using regular HTTP (see HTTP above).
  2. The client receives the requested webpage and executes the JavaScript on the page which opens a connection to the server.
  3. The server sends an event to the client when there's new information available.

    • Real-time traffic from server to client, mostly that's what you'll need
    • You'll want to use a server that has an event loop
    • Not possible to connect with a server from another domain
    • If you want to read more, I found these very useful: (article), (article), (article), (tutorial).

HTML5 SSE

HTML5 Websockets:

  1. A client requests a webpage from a server using regular http (see HTTP above).
  2. The client receives the requested webpage and executes the JavaScript on the page which opens a connection with the server.
  3. The server and the client can now send each other messages when new data (on either side) is available.

    • Real-time traffic from the server to the client and from the client to the server
    • You'll want to use a server that has an event loop
    • With WebSockets it is possible to connect with a server from another domain.
    • It is also possible to use a third party hosted websocket server, for example Pusher or others. This way you'll only have to implement the client side, which is very easy!
    • If you want to read more, I found these very useful: (article), (article) (tutorial).

HTML5 WebSockets

Comet:

Comet is a collection of techniques prior to HTML5 which use streaming and long-polling to achieve real time applications. Read more on wikipedia or this article.


Now, which one of them should I use for a realtime app (that I need to code). I have been hearing a lot about websockets (with socket.io [a node.js library]) but why not PHP ?

You can use PHP with WebSockets, check out Ratchet.

  • 13
    This is awesome! I am reading up on SSE and found this article, it's very nice - like I've now compared stuff, can you also include SSE here so we can also cross-check it's difference with Websocket? – index Nov 7 '12 at 7:34
  • 1
    @Tieme Oh was that it? I thought SSE meant Server-Sent Events. Anyway, thanks, I see it now. – index Nov 16 '12 at 3:28
  • 1
    Q: in php let's say you were using websocket would every client connected to my server using ws: would have one thread allocated to him/her and its size would be ~2mb as is the case with normal requests? how would that differ in nodejs? How many concurrent clients can nodejs handle and when it breaks what happens? – Muhammad Umer Jul 13 '13 at 7:13
  • 1
    @Tieme what's the difference between SSE and long pulling? From your words, they are almost the same. – tomwang1013 Oct 23 '13 at 7:38
  • 5
    You can accomplish the same with both solutions but the mechanism is different. Long-polling uses 'regular' http data, SSE uses a different underlying protocol and needs a different server setup compared to long-polling. – Tieme Oct 23 '13 at 7:53

Tieme put a lot of effort into his excellent answer, but I think the core of the OPs question is how these technologies relate to PHP rather than how each technology works.

PHP is the most used language in web development besides the obvious client side html, css, and javascript. Yet PHP has 2 major issues when it comes to real time applications:

1) PHP started as a very basic CGI. PHP has progressed very far since it's early stage, but it happened in small steps. PHP already had many millions of users by the time it became the embed-able and flexible C library that it is today, most of whom were dependent on it's earlier model of execution, so it hasn't yet made a solid attempt to escape the cgi model internally. Even the commandline interface invokes the PHP library (libphp5.so on linux, php5ts.dll on windows, etc) as if it still a cgi processing a GET/POST request. It still executes code as if it just has to build a "page" and then end it's life cycle. As a result, it has very little support for multi-thread or event driven programming (within PHP userspace), making it currently unpractical for real time, multi-user applications.

Note that PHP does have extensions to provide event loops (such as libevent) and threads (such as pthreads) in PHP userspace, but very, very, few of the applications use these.

2) PHP still has significant issues with garbage collection. Although these issues have been consistently improving (likely it's greatest step to end the life cycle as described above), even the best attempts at creating long running PHP applications require being restarted on a regular basis. This also make it unpractical for real time applications.

PHP 7 will be a great step to fix these issues as well, and seems very promising as a platform for real-time applications.

I have tried to make note about these and have collected and written examples from a java perspective.

HTTP for Java Developers

Reverse Ajax - Old style

Async Handling on server side

Reverse Ajax - New style

Server Sent Events

Putting it here for any java developer who is looking into the same subject.

  • All the links are dead now – SpringLearner Dec 7 '17 at 4:28
  • 3
    @SpringLearner thank you for noting it. I have updated the links – John Dec 7 '17 at 9:09

protected by Shankar Damodaran Jul 9 '14 at 8:11

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