21

I'm currently having problems to execute a command from a shell variable.

In general the following works as expected:

COMMAND="echo A"
echo $COMMAND
$COMMAND

produces:

echo A
A

But if I do

COMMAND="su aUser -s /bin/bash -c 'echo A'"
echo $COMMAND
$COMMAND

I get

su aUser -s /bin/bash -c 'echo A'
Password: 
A': -c: line 0: unexpected EOF while looking for matching `''
A': -c: line 1: syntax error: unexpected end of file

If I enter the line

su aUser -s /bin/bash -c 'echo A'

directly it works as expected.

It seems my assumption that $COMMAND is equal to entering the content as command directly is wrong.

Questions

1) Does anyone know how I can run the command from a variable?

2) What exactly is the difference between

COMMAND="command"
$COMMAND

and

command

?

marked as duplicate by tripleee bash Apr 20 '16 at 11:17

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  • 7
    This is one of those common Don't Do That things. mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/050 A better approach is to use set -x if you want to see what you are doing. – tripleee Jun 18 '12 at 9:19
  • Thanks for that link. Didn't know the page yet. – Markus Kreusch Jun 18 '12 at 12:49
22

You need eval.

$ eval $VARIABLE
  • 2
    Ok that works. Any hints what $COMMAND exactly does and why it is different to eval? – Markus Kreusch Jun 18 '12 at 9:04
  • See tripleee's comment and learn to love the bash FAQ. – Sorpigal Jun 18 '12 at 10:37
  • 3
    Avoid eval whenever possible, it has a reputation for being a source of weird bugs. If you must use it, at least double-quote the variable (i.e. eval "$VARIABLE"). Loosely speaking, $VARIABLE does some, but not all, of the normal parsing before executing; eval $VARIABLE does some parsing and then parses it again; eval "$VARIABLE" parses it exactly once. But you're really better off using something like @glenn's answer. – Gordon Davisson Jun 18 '12 at 15:42
31

Arrays are useful to keep your parameters whole:

command=(su aUser -s /bin/bash -c 'echo A')

and invoke it exactly like this:

"${command[@]}"
  • 1
    This works too... to sad that one cannot mark two answers as accepted. – Markus Kreusch Jun 18 '12 at 12:50
  • 2
    That is better than eval but it will not work in Bourne Shell, only in bash – Igor Chubin Jun 18 '12 at 16:05

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