71

How do I end a Tkinter program? Let's say I have this code:

from Tkinter import *

def quit():
    # code to exit

root = Tk()
Button(root, text="Quit", command=quit).pack()
root.mainloop()

How should I define the quit function to exit my application?

19 Answers 19

88

You should use destroy() to close a tkinter window.

from Tkinter import *

root = Tk()
Button(root, text="Quit", command=root.destroy).pack()
root.mainloop()

Explanation:

root.quit()

The above line just Bypasses the root.mainloop() i.e root.mainloop() will still be running in background if quit() command is executed.

root.destroy()

While destroy() command vanish out root.mainloop() i.e root.mainloop() stops.

So as you just want to quit the program so you should use root.destroy() as it will it stop the mainloop().

But if you want to run some infinite loop and you don't want to destroy your Tk window and want to execute some code after root.mainloop() line then you should use root.quit(). Ex:

from Tkinter import *
def quit():
    global root
    root.quit()

root = Tk()
while True:
    Button(root, text="Quit", command=quit).pack()
    root.mainloop()
    #do something
  • 2
    If root.quit() is used, how can the window be found again later in a different script to be destroyed (so as not to continue using system resources)? – Raj Jun 29 '16 at 0:14
  • 3
    Your first statement is false. calling quit will destroy all widgets; if the widgets are destroyed, mainloop will exit. – Bryan Oakley Nov 12 '16 at 0:38
  • 1
    After some research I believe this also applies to ALL code being executed. So if you have a mainloop() of TKinter in a command line script, use root.quit() and not root.destroy(), otherwise your command line script will not continue executing code after mainloop(). I tested this and it works for me (I am aware that TKinter is not intended to be used in such a design, nevertheless, it works) – Alex Dec 20 '17 at 6:30
36
def quit()
    root.quit()

or

def quit()
    root.destroy()
  • does any one know which method is more 'correct' or is it a case of one is more readable than another – Lee May 7 '11 at 3:09
  • 8
    sorry, i've found the answer and just thought i'd share it. It is better to use root.destroy() as it terminates the main program loop. See: http://www.daniweb.com/software-development/python/threads/66698 – Lee May 7 '11 at 3:13
15
import Tkinter as tk

def quit(root):
    root.destroy()

root = tk.Tk()
tk.Button(root, text="Quit", command=lambda root=root:quit(root)).pack()
root.mainloop()
6

The usual method to exit a Python program:

sys.exit()

(to which you can also pass an exit status) or

raise SystemExit

will work fine in a Tkinter program.

6

I think you wrongly understood the quit function of Tkinter. This function does not require you to define.

First, you should modify your function as follows:

from Tkinter import *
root = Tk()
Button(root, text="Quit", command=root.quit).pack()
root.mainloop()

Then, you should use '.pyw' suffix to save this files and double-click the '.pyw' file to run your GUI, this time, you can end the GUI with a click of the Button, and you can also find that there will be no unpleasant DOS window. (If you run the '.py' file, the quit function will fail.)

4

Illumination in case of confusion...

def quit(self):
    self.destroy()
    exit()

A) destroy() stops the mainloop and kills the window, but leaves python running

B) exit() stops the whole process

Just to clarify in case someone missed what destroy() was doing, and the OP also asked how to "end" a tkinter program.

1

In idlelib.PyShell module, root variable of type Tk is defined to be global

At the end of PyShell.main() function it calls root.mainloop() function which is an infinite loop and it runs till the loop is interrupted by root.quit() function. Hence, root.quit() will only interrupt the execution of mainloop

In order to destroy all widgets pertaining to that idlelib window, root.destroy() needs to be called, which is the last line of idlelib.PyShell.main() function.

1

You can use:

root.destroy()

Or

root.quit()

If that does not work, change root to what ever your variable was at the start of your program

import tkinter

main = Tk()

main.destroy()

main.mainloop
1

The easiest way would be to click the red button (leftmost on macOS and rightmost on Windows). If you want to bind a specific function to a button widget, you can do this:

class App:
    def __init__(self, master)
        frame = Tkinter.Frame(master)
        frame.pack()
        self.quit_button = Tkinter.Button(frame, text = 'Quit', command = frame.quit)
        self.quit_button.pack()

Or, to make things a little more complex, use protocol handlers and the destroy() method.

import tkMessageBox

def confirmExit():
    if tkMessageBox.askokcancel('Quit', 'Are you sure you want to exit?'):
        root.destroy()
root = Tk()
root.protocol('WM_DELETE_WINDOW', confirmExit)
root.mainloop()
1

In case anyone wants to bind their Escape button to closing the entire GUI:

master = Tk()
master.title("Python")

def close(event):
    sys.exit()

master.bind('<Escape>',close)
master.mainloop()
1

you only need to type this:

root.destroy()

and you don't even need the quit() function cause when you set that as commmand it will quit the entire program.

0
def quit1():
     root.destroy()

Button(root, text="Quit", command=quit1).pack()
root.mainloop()
0
import sys
from Tkinter import *
def quit():
    sys.exit()
root = Tk()
Button(root, text="Quit", command=quit).pack()
root.mainloop()

Should do what you are asking.

  • Hey Harrison, you have a very late answer that does not provide anything extra for the existing answers. While we greatly appreciate the participation your answer does not provide any additional insight. Take a look at some of the other answers for example, they do a great job explaining why some approaches work and others do not. – TheOneWhoPrograms Apr 4 '18 at 20:39
0

For menu bars:

def quit():
    root.destroy()

menubar = Menu(root)
filemenu = Menu(menubar, tearoff=0)

filemenu.add_separator()

filemenu.add_command(label="Exit", command=quit)
menubar.add_cascade(label="menubarname", menu=filemenu)
root.config(menu=menubar)
root.mainloop()
0

I use below codes for the exit of Tkinter window:

from tkinter import*
root=Tk()
root.bind("<Escape>",lambda q:root.destroy())
root.mainloop()

or

from tkinter import*
root=Tk()
Button(root,text="exit",command=root.destroy).pack()
root.mainloop()

or

from tkinter import*
root=Tk()
Button(root,text="quit",command=quit).pack()
root.mainloop()

or

from tkinter import*
root=Tk()
Button(root,text="exit",command=exit).pack()
root.mainloop()
0

Code snippet below. I'm providing a small scenario.

import tkinter as tk
from tkinter import *

root = Tk()

def exit():
    if askokcancel("Quit", "Do you really want to quit?"):
        root.destroy()

menubar = Menu(root, background='#000099', foreground='white',
               activebackground='#004c99', activeforeground='white')

fileMenu = Menu(menubar,  tearoff=0, background="grey", foreground='black',
                activebackground='#004c99', activeforeground='white')
menubar.add_cascade(label='File', menu=fileMenu)

fileMenu.add_command(label='Exit', command=exit)

root.config(bg='#2A2C2B',menu=menubar)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    root.mainloop()

I have created a blank window here & add file menu option on the same window(root window), where I only add one option exit.

Then simply run mainloop for root.

Try to do it once

0

root.destroy will work.
root.quit will also work.

In my case I had

quitButton = Button(frame, text = "Quit", command = root.destroy)

Hope it helps.

-2

Try this:

from Tkinter import *
import sys
def exitApp():
    sys.exit()
root = Tk()
Button(root, text="Quit", command=exitApp).pack()
root.mainloop()
-3

try this.

    self.parent.destroy() 
    self.parent.quit()

maybe you send root like parameter to a frame that you did. so If you want to finish it you have to call your father so he can close it all, instead of closing each one of his children.

  • 3
    Please don't post speculative answers. You should ideally only post when you have a proven and verifiable answer. If you have suggestions those can go in a comment. – SuperBiasedMan May 27 '15 at 11:04
  • When you are using a class, self.parent.destroy() is what worked in my situation. – Zak Feb 4 '16 at 1:11

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