226

Let's say I have a list of dictionaries:

[
    {'id': 1, 'name': 'john', 'age': 34},
    {'id': 1, 'name': 'john', 'age': 34},
    {'id': 2, 'name': 'hanna', 'age': 30},
]

How can I obtain a list of unique dictionaries (removing the duplicates)?

[
    {'id': 1, 'name': 'john', 'age': 34},
    {'id': 2, 'name': 'hanna', 'age': 30},
]
4

22 Answers 22

323

So make a temporary dict with the key being the id. This filters out the duplicates. The values() of the dict will be the list

In Python2.7

>>> L=[
... {'id':1,'name':'john', 'age':34},
... {'id':1,'name':'john', 'age':34},
... {'id':2,'name':'hanna', 'age':30},
... ]
>>> {v['id']:v for v in L}.values()
[{'age': 34, 'id': 1, 'name': 'john'}, {'age': 30, 'id': 2, 'name': 'hanna'}]

In Python3

>>> L=[
... {'id':1,'name':'john', 'age':34},
... {'id':1,'name':'john', 'age':34},
... {'id':2,'name':'hanna', 'age':30},
... ] 
>>> list({v['id']:v for v in L}.values())
[{'age': 34, 'id': 1, 'name': 'john'}, {'age': 30, 'id': 2, 'name': 'hanna'}]

In Python2.5/2.6

>>> L=[
... {'id':1,'name':'john', 'age':34},
... {'id':1,'name':'john', 'age':34},
... {'id':2,'name':'hanna', 'age':30},
... ] 
>>> dict((v['id'],v) for v in L).values()
[{'age': 34, 'id': 1, 'name': 'john'}, {'age': 30, 'id': 2, 'name': 'hanna'}]
9
  • 2
    @JorgeVidinha assuming each could be cast to str (or unicode), try this: {str(v['flight'])+':'+str(v['lon'])+','+str(v['lat']): v for v in stream}.values() This just creates a unique key based on your values. Like 'MH370:-21.474370,86.325589' Dec 21, 2016 at 21:25
  • 4
    @JorgeVidinha, you can use a tuple as the dictionary key {(v['flight'], v['lon'], v['lat']): v for v in stream}.values() Dec 22, 2016 at 3:10
  • 2
    If you need all values considered and not just the ID you can use list({str(i):i for i in L}.values()) Here we use str(i) to create a unique string that represents the dictionary which is used to filter the duplicates.
    – DelboyJay
    Jul 19, 2019 at 14:43
  • 3
    This does not actually de-duplicate identical dictionaries (where dict1 == dict2 returns true). The solution only works if you have identified a key to compare.
    – Ernesto
    Apr 7, 2020 at 18:51
  • 1
    Hey can someone explain what is actually happening here? I don't know. list({v['id']:v for v in L}.values()) Jul 17, 2020 at 0:44
106

The usual way to find just the common elements in a set is to use Python's set class. Just add all the elements to the set, then convert the set to a list, and bam the duplicates are gone.

The problem, of course, is that a set() can only contain hashable entries, and a dict is not hashable.

If I had this problem, my solution would be to convert each dict into a string that represents the dict, then add all the strings to a set() then read out the string values as a list() and convert back to dict.

A good representation of a dict in string form is JSON format. And Python has a built-in module for JSON (called json of course).

The remaining problem is that the elements in a dict are not ordered, and when Python converts the dict to a JSON string, you might get two JSON strings that represent equivalent dictionaries but are not identical strings. The easy solution is to pass the argument sort_keys=True when you call json.dumps().

EDIT: This solution was assuming that a given dict could have any part different. If we can assume that every dict with the same "id" value will match every other dict with the same "id" value, then this is overkill; @gnibbler's solution would be faster and easier.

EDIT: Now there is a comment from André Lima explicitly saying that if the ID is a duplicate, it's safe to assume that the whole dict is a duplicate. So this answer is overkill and I recommend @gnibbler's answer.

6
  • 3
    While overkill given the ID in this particular case, this is still an excellent answer!
    – Josh Werts
    Sep 3, 2013 at 17:37
  • 13
    This helps me since my dictionary does not have a key, and is only uniquely identified by all of its entries. Thanks!
    – ericso
    Sep 24, 2014 at 16:51
  • This solution works most of the time but there may performance issues with scaling up but the author I think knows this and therefore recommends the solution with "id". Performance concerns: This solution uses serializing to string and then deserializing ... serializing/deserializing is expensive computation and does not usually scale up well (number of items is n>1e6 or each dictionary contains >1e6 items or both) or if you have to execute this many times >1e6 or often. Nov 14, 2019 at 13:37
  • 2
    Just as a short aside this solution illustrates a great canonical example of why you would want to design your solution... i.e. if you have an id that is unique... then you can efficiently access the data... if you are lazy and don't have an id then your data access is more expensive. Nov 14, 2019 at 13:40
  • Implementation: ` output_lod = {json.dumps(d, sort_keys=True) for d in lod} output_lod = [json.loads(x) for x in output_lod] `
    – Alec
    May 9, 2020 at 19:58
66

In case the dictionaries are only uniquely identified by all items (ID is not available) you can use the answer using JSON. The following is an alternative that does not use JSON, and will work as long as all dictionary values are immutable

[dict(s) for s in set(frozenset(d.items()) for d in L)]
1
  • I ended up going with this, very elegant working solution
    – swimmer
    Feb 9 at 15:04
22

Here's a reasonably compact solution, though I suspect not particularly efficient (to put it mildly):

>>> ds = [{'id':1,'name':'john', 'age':34},
...       {'id':1,'name':'john', 'age':34},
...       {'id':2,'name':'hanna', 'age':30}
...       ]
>>> map(dict, set(tuple(sorted(d.items())) for d in ds))
[{'age': 30, 'id': 2, 'name': 'hanna'}, {'age': 34, 'id': 1, 'name': 'john'}]
3
  • 5
    Surround the map() call with list() in Python 3 to get a list back, otherwise it's a map object.
    – dmn
    Jun 21, 2017 at 18:49
  • an additional benefit of this approach in python 3.6+ is that the list ordering is preserved
    – jnnnnn
    Oct 29, 2019 at 5:15
  • @jnnnnn I'm using Python 3.8.6 and list ordering is not preserved! My list: x=[{'a':15}, {'a':15}, {'b':30}] Converting: list(map(dict, set(tuple(sorted(i.items())) for i in x))) which returns: [{'b': 30}, {'a': 15}]
    – Shayan
    Nov 15, 2021 at 10:32
18

You can use numpy library (works for Python2.x only):

   import numpy as np 

   list_of_unique_dicts=list(np.unique(np.array(list_of_dicts)))

To get it worked with Python 3.x (and recent versions of numpy), you need to convert array of dicts to numpy array of strings, e.g.

list_of_unique_dicts=list(np.unique(np.array(list_of_dicts).astype(str)))
3
11
a = [
{'id':1,'name':'john', 'age':34},
{'id':1,'name':'john', 'age':34},
{'id':2,'name':'hanna', 'age':30},
]

b = {x['id']:x for x in a}.values()

print(b)

outputs:

[{'age': 34, 'id': 1, 'name': 'john'}, {'age': 30, 'id': 2, 'name': 'hanna'}]

4
  • In the same example. how can I get the dicts containing only the similar IDs ?
    – user8162
    Apr 10, 2016 at 16:13
  • @user8162, what would you want the output to look like?
    – Yusuf X
    Apr 12, 2016 at 14:20
  • Sometimes, I will have same ID, but different age. so output to be [{'age': [34, 40], 'id': 1, 'name': ['john', Peter]}]. In short, if IDs are same, then combine the contents of others to a list as I mentioned here. Thanks in advance.
    – user8162
    Apr 12, 2016 at 15:56
  • 2
    b = {x['id']:[y for y in a if y['id'] == x['id'] ] for x in a} is one way to group them together.
    – Yusuf X
    Apr 18, 2016 at 8:07
8

Since the id is sufficient for detecting duplicates, and the id is hashable: run 'em through a dictionary that has the id as the key. The value for each key is the original dictionary.

deduped_dicts = dict((item["id"], item) for item in list_of_dicts).values()

In Python 3, values() doesn't return a list; you'll need to wrap the whole right-hand-side of that expression in list(), and you can write the meat of the expression more economically as a dict comprehension:

deduped_dicts = list({item["id"]: item for item in list_of_dicts}.values())

Note that the result likely will not be in the same order as the original. If that's a requirement, you could use a Collections.OrderedDict instead of a dict.

As an aside, it may make a good deal of sense to just keep the data in a dictionary that uses the id as key to begin with.

8

We can do with pandas

import pandas as pd
yourdict=pd.DataFrame(L).drop_duplicates().to_dict('r')
Out[293]: [{'age': 34, 'id': 1, 'name': 'john'}, {'age': 30, 'id': 2, 'name': 'hanna'}]

Notice slightly different from the accept answer.

drop_duplicates will check all column in pandas , if all same then the row will be dropped .

For example :

If we change the 2nd dict name from john to peter

L=[
    {'id': 1, 'name': 'john', 'age': 34},
    {'id': 1, 'name': 'peter', 'age': 34},
    {'id': 2, 'name': 'hanna', 'age': 30},
]
pd.DataFrame(L).drop_duplicates().to_dict('r')
Out[295]: 
[{'age': 34, 'id': 1, 'name': 'john'},
 {'age': 34, 'id': 1, 'name': 'peter'},# here will still keeping the dict in the out put 
 {'age': 30, 'id': 2, 'name': 'hanna'}]
1
  • This is a good trick, but it should be noted that this will not work for nested dictionaries.
    – GiovanH
    Oct 28, 2020 at 23:11
4

I don't know if you only want the id of your dicts in the list to be unique, but if the goal is to have a set of dict where the unicity is on all keys' values.. you should use tuples key like this in your comprehension :

>>> L=[
...     {'id':1,'name':'john', 'age':34},
...    {'id':1,'name':'john', 'age':34}, 
...    {'id':2,'name':'hanna', 'age':30},
...    {'id':2,'name':'hanna', 'age':50}
...    ]
>>> len(L)
4
>>> L=list({(v['id'], v['age'], v['name']):v for v in L}.values())
>>>L
[{'id': 1, 'name': 'john', 'age': 34}, {'id': 2, 'name': 'hanna', 'age': 30}, {'id': 2, 'name': 'hanna', 'age': 50}]
>>>len(L)
3

Hope it helps you or another person having the concern....

1
  • Similar with comprehensive answers above BUT, this is more generic and might provide full unique option. So this is upvoted.
    – asevindik
    Jan 13 at 16:24
4

I have summarized my favorites to try out:

https://repl.it/@SmaMa/Python-List-of-unique-dictionaries

# ----------------------------------------------
# Setup
# ----------------------------------------------

myList = [
  {"id":"1", "lala": "value_1"},
  {"id": "2", "lala": "value_2"}, 
  {"id": "2", "lala": "value_2"}, 
  {"id": "3", "lala": "value_3"}
]
print("myList:", myList)

# -----------------------------------------------
# Option 1 if objects has an unique identifier
# -----------------------------------------------

myUniqueList = list({myObject['id']:myObject for myObject in myList}.values())
print("myUniqueList:", myUniqueList)

# -----------------------------------------------
# Option 2 if uniquely identified by whole object
# -----------------------------------------------

myUniqueSet = [dict(s) for s in set(frozenset(myObject.items()) for myObject in myList)]
print("myUniqueSet:", myUniqueSet)

# -----------------------------------------------
# Option 3 for hashable objects (not dicts)
# -----------------------------------------------

myHashableObjects = list(set(["1", "2", "2", "3"]))
print("myHashAbleList:", myHashableObjects)
3

Expanding on John La Rooy (Python - List of unique dictionaries) answer, making it a bit more flexible:

def dedup_dict_list(list_of_dicts: list, columns: list) -> list:
    return list({''.join(row[column] for column in columns): row
                for row in list_of_dicts}.values())

Calling Function:

sorted_list_of_dicts = dedup_dict_list(
    unsorted_list_of_dicts, ['id', 'name'])
3

There are a lot of answers here, so let me add another:

import json
from typing import List

def dedup_dicts(items: List[dict]):
    dedupped = [ json.loads(i) for i in set(json.dumps(item, sort_keys=True) for item in items)]
    return dedupped

items = [
    {'id': 1, 'name': 'john', 'age': 34},
    {'id': 1, 'name': 'john', 'age': 34},
    {'id': 2, 'name': 'hanna', 'age': 30},
]
dedup_dicts(items)
3

In python 3, simple trick, but based on unique field (id):

data = [ {'id': 1}, {'id': 1}]

list({ item['id'] : item for item in data}.values())
1

In python 3.6+ (what I've tested), just use:

import json

#Toy example, but will also work for your case 
myListOfDicts = [{'a':1,'b':2},{'a':1,'b':2},{'a':1,'b':3}]
#Start by sorting each dictionary by keys
myListOfDictsSorted = [sorted(d.items()) for d in myListOfDicts]

#Using json methods with set() to get unique dict
myListOfUniqueDicts = list(map(json.loads,set(map(json.dumps, myListOfDictsSorted))))

print(myListOfUniqueDicts)

Explanation: we're mapping the json.dumps to encode the dictionaries as json objects, which are immutable. set can then be used to produce an iterable of unique immutables. Finally, we convert back to our dictionary representation using json.loads. Note that initially, one must sort by keys to arrange the dictionaries in a unique form. This is valid for Python 3.6+ since dictionaries are ordered by default.

1
  • 1
    Remember to sort the keys before dumping to JSON. You also don't need to convert to list before doing set.
    – Nathan
    Apr 6, 2019 at 16:07
1

Well all the answers mentioned here are good, but in some answers one can face error if the dictionary items have nested list or dictionary, so I propose simple answer

a = [str(i) for i in a]
a = list(set(a))
a = [eval(i) for i in a]
1
  • Best Answer, except I would use literal_eval from ast just to be safe as eval isn't safe. Jan 27 at 16:54
1

Objects can fit into sets. You can work with objects instead of dicts and if needed after all set insertions convert back to a list of dicts. Example

class Person:
    def __init__(self, id, age, name):
        self.id = id
        self.age = age
        self.name = name

my_set = {Person(id=2, age=3, name='Jhon')}

my_set.add(Person(id=3, age=34, name='Guy'))

my_set.add({Person(id=2, age=3, name='Jhon')})

# if needed convert to list of dicts
list_of_dict = [{'id': obj.id,
                 'name': obj.name,
                 'age': obj.age} for obj in my_set]
1
  • 1
    A shorter way to define Person: Person = collections.namedtuple('Person', ['id', 'age', 'name'])
    – darw
    Nov 4, 2021 at 10:24
0

A quick-and-dirty solution is just by generating a new list.

sortedlist = []

for item in listwhichneedssorting:
    if item not in sortedlist:
        sortedlist.append(item)
0

Let me add mine.

  1. sort target dict so that {'a' : 1, 'b': 2} and {'b': 2, 'a': 1} are not treated differently

  2. make it as json

  3. deduplicate via set (as set does not apply to dicts)

  4. again, turn it into dict via json.loads

import json

[json.loads(i) for i in set([json.dumps(i) for i in [dict(sorted(i.items())) for i in target_dict]])]
0

If there is not a unique id in the dictionaries, then I'd keep it simple and define a function as follows:

def unique(sequence):
    result = []
    for item in sequence:
        if item not in result:
            result.append(item)
    return result

The advantage with this approach, is that you can reuse this function for any comparable objects. It makes your code very readable, works in all modern versions of Python, preserves the order in the dictionaries, and is fast too compared to its alternatives.

>>> L = [
... {'id': 1, 'name': 'john', 'age': 34},
... {'id': 1, 'name': 'john', 'age': 34},
... {'id': 2, 'name': 'hanna', 'age': 30},
... ] 
>>> unique(L)
[{'id': 1, 'name': 'john', 'age': 34}, {'id': 2, 'name': 'hanna', 'age': 30}]
-1

Pretty straightforward option:

L = [
    {'id':1,'name':'john', 'age':34},
    {'id':1,'name':'john', 'age':34},
    {'id':2,'name':'hanna', 'age':30},
    ]


D = dict()
for l in L: D[l['id']] = l
output = list(D.values())
print output
-2

Heres an implementation with little memory overhead at the cost of not being as compact as the rest.

values = [ {'id':2,'name':'hanna', 'age':30},
           {'id':1,'name':'john', 'age':34},
           {'id':1,'name':'john', 'age':34},
           {'id':2,'name':'hanna', 'age':30},
           {'id':1,'name':'john', 'age':34},]
count = {}
index = 0
while index < len(values):
    if values[index]['id'] in count:
        del values[index]
    else:
        count[values[index]['id']] = 1
        index += 1

output:

[{'age': 30, 'id': 2, 'name': 'hanna'}, {'age': 34, 'id': 1, 'name': 'john'}]
4
  • 1
    You need to test this a bit more. Modifying the list while you are iterating over it might not always work as you expect Jun 19, 2012 at 0:03
  • @gnibbler very good point! I'll delete the answer and test it more thoroughly.
    – Samy Vilar
    Jun 19, 2012 at 0:05
  • Looks better. You can use a set to keep track of the ids instead of the dict. Consider starting the index at len(values) and counting backwards, that means that you can always decrement index whether you del or not. eg for index in reversed(range(len(values))): Jun 19, 2012 at 0:41
  • @gnibbler interesting, do sets have near constant look up like dictionaries?
    – Samy Vilar
    Jun 19, 2012 at 0:51
-4

This is the solution I found:

usedID = []

x = [
{'id':1,'name':'john', 'age':34},
{'id':1,'name':'john', 'age':34},
{'id':2,'name':'hanna', 'age':30},
]

for each in x:
    if each['id'] in usedID:
        x.remove(each)
    else:
        usedID.append(each['id'])

print x

Basically you check if the ID is present in the list, if it is, delete the dictionary, if not, append the ID to the list

6
  • I'd use a set rather than list for usedID. It's a faster lookup, and more readable
    – happydave
    Jun 18, 2012 at 23:44
  • Yea i didnt know about sets... but I am learning... I was just looking at @gnibbler answer...
    – tabchas
    Jun 18, 2012 at 23:46
  • 1
    You need to test this a bit more. Modifying the list while you are iterating over it might not always work as you expect Jun 19, 2012 at 0:05
  • Yea I don't understand why it doesn't work... Any ideas what I'm doing wrong?
    – tabchas
    Jun 19, 2012 at 2:05
  • No I caught the problem... its just that I dont understand why its giving that problem... do you know?
    – tabchas
    Jun 19, 2012 at 3:39

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