56

I'm trying to create a list of permutations of a list, such that, for example, perms(list("a", "b", "c")) returns

list(list("a", "b", "c"), list("a", "c", "b"), list("b", "a", "c"),
     list("b", "c", "a"), list("c", "a", "b"), list("c", "b", "a"))

I'm not sure how to proceed, any help would be greatly appreciated.

| |
  • 3
    There are several packages for generating permutations in R. I wrote a summary that includes benchmarks as well as demonstrations of usage for each available method. – Joseph Wood Jan 4 '18 at 21:12

11 Answers 11

54

combinat::permn will do that work:

> library(combinat)
> permn(letters[1:3])
[[1]]
[1] "a" "b" "c"

[[2]]
[1] "a" "c" "b"

[[3]]
[1] "c" "a" "b"

[[4]]
[1] "c" "b" "a"

[[5]]
[1] "b" "c" "a"

[[6]]
[1] "b" "a" "c"

Note that calculation is huge if the element is large.

| |
  • How about the case when from 3 letter string we would like to have not only all 3 letter elements but also 2 letter and 1 letter elements? – Przemyslaw Remin Mar 3 at 10:57
51

A while back I had to do this in base R without loading any packages.

permutations <- function(n){
    if(n==1){
        return(matrix(1))
    } else {
        sp <- permutations(n-1)
        p <- nrow(sp)
        A <- matrix(nrow=n*p,ncol=n)
        for(i in 1:n){
            A[(i-1)*p+1:p,] <- cbind(i,sp+(sp>=i))
        }
        return(A)
    }
}

Usage:

> matrix(letters[permutations(3)],ncol=3)
     [,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,] "a"  "b"  "c" 
[2,] "a"  "c"  "b" 
[3,] "b"  "a"  "c" 
[4,] "b"  "c"  "a" 
[5,] "c"  "a"  "b" 
[6,] "c"  "b"  "a" 
| |
  • 2
    Nice function. Seems pretty fast too. – A5C1D2H2I1M1N2O1R2T1 Mar 28 '14 at 16:46
  • 1
    This function is much faster than combinat::permn with a larger number of permutations. For example: microbenchmark:microbenchmark(permn(letters[1:9]), matrix(letters[permutations(9)],ncol=9), times=20) – Anthony May 21 at 19:44
35

You can try permutations() from the gtools package, but unlike permn() from combinat, it doesn't output a list:

> library(gtools)
> permutations(3, 3, letters[1:3])
     [,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,] "a"  "b"  "c" 
[2,] "a"  "c"  "b" 
[3,] "b"  "a"  "c" 
[4,] "b"  "c"  "a" 
[5,] "c"  "a"  "b" 
[6,] "c"  "b"  "a" 
| |
  • 5
    It deserves noting that permutations is more flexible. It allows permutating m of n elements and allow repeated use of elements. I found this after trying permn without success. – mt1022 Jan 6 '17 at 8:45
  • It cannot generate all the possible permutations when the v Source Vector has repeated elements. So let's say that I want to get all the possible permutations of the word letters – George Pipis Sep 18 at 12:03
33

base R can also provide the answer:

all <- expand.grid(p1 = letters[1:3], p2 = letters[1:3], p3 = letters[1:3], stringsAsFactors = FALSE) 
perms <- all[apply(all, 1, function(x) {length(unique(x)) == 3}),]
| |
16

A solution in base R, no dependencies on other packages:

> getPerms <- function(x) {
    if (length(x) == 1) {
        return(x)
    }
    else {
        res <- matrix(nrow = 0, ncol = length(x))
        for (i in seq_along(x)) {
            res <- rbind(res, cbind(x[i], Recall(x[-i])))
        }
        return(res)
    }
}

> getPerms(letters[1:3])
     [,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,] "a"  "b"  "c" 
[2,] "a"  "c"  "b" 
[3,] "b"  "a"  "c" 
[4,] "b"  "c"  "a" 
[5,] "c"  "a"  "b" 
[6,] "c"  "b"  "a"

I hope this helps.

| |
  • 1
    Outperforms the gtools solution. – sindri_baldur Jan 23 '17 at 20:15
  • Haven't tested before, but it seems so. Cool. – Adrian Jan 24 '17 at 22:06
10
# Another recursive implementation    
# for those who like to roll their own, no package required 
    permutations <- function( x, prefix = c() )
    {
        if(length(x) == 0 ) return(prefix)
        do.call(rbind, sapply(1:length(x), FUN = function(idx) permutations( x[-idx], c( prefix, x[idx])), simplify = FALSE))
    }

    permutations(letters[1:3])
    #    [,1] [,2] [,3]
    #[1,] "a"  "b"  "c" 
    #[2,] "a"  "c"  "b" 
    #[3,] "b"  "a"  "c" 
    #[4,] "b"  "c"  "a" 
    #[5,] "c"  "a"  "b" 
    #[6,] "c"  "b"  "a" 
| |
9

Try:

> a = letters[1:3]
> eg = expand.grid(a,a,a)
> eg[!(eg$Var1==eg$Var2 | eg$Var2==eg$Var3 | eg$Var1==eg$Var3),]
   Var1 Var2 Var3
6     c    b    a
8     b    c    a
12    c    a    b
16    a    c    b
20    b    a    c
22    a    b    c

As suggested by @Adrian in comments, last line can be replaced by:

eg[apply(eg, 1, anyDuplicated) == 0, ]
| |
  • or, for the last line: eg[apply(eg, 1, anyDuplicated) == 0, ] – Adrian Dec 15 '15 at 9:04
  • @dusadrian A note on scalability: I would think twice before using this approach in "serious" code, as the searched space (eg), grows unreasonably huge as the sample size/sampled set increases (hit rate: n! vs. n^n - worsens near-exponentially estimated from Stirling's formula). For the 10 out of 10 case, the hit ratio is only prod(1:10) / (10 ^ 10) = 0.036% already. And it seems all those examined variants are at some point stored in memory, in a data frame. However, I always liked this one for small manual tasks as it's so easy to understand. – brezniczky Jun 24 '16 at 16:48
  • @brezniczky Yes indeed, this is only for demonstrative purposes. I have a completely different solution (down this thread), which is self contained. Both use plain R, but of course for more intensive memory operations one should implement some compiled code (most of the R's internal functions are written in C, actually). – Adrian Jun 25 '16 at 17:21
4

A fun solution "probabilistic" using sample for base R:

elements <- c("a", "b", "c")
k <- length(elements)
res=unique(t(sapply(1:200, function(x) sample(elements, k))))
# below, check you have all the permutations you need (if not, try again)
nrow(res) == factorial(k)
res

basically you call many random samples, hoping to get them all, and you unique them.

| |
1

In case this helps, there is the "arrangements" package, that allows you to simply do :

> abc  = letters[1:3]

> permutations(abc)
     [,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,] "a"  "b"  "c" 
[2,] "a"  "c"  "b" 
[3,] "b"  "a"  "c" 
[4,] "b"  "c"  "a" 
[5,] "c"  "a"  "b" 
[6,] "c"  "b"  "a" 
| |
1

We can use base function combn with a little modifcation:

   combn_n <- function(x) {
      m <- length(x) - 1 # number of elements to choose: n-1 
      xr <- rev(x) # reversed x
      part_1 <- rbind(combn(x, m), xr, deparse.level = 0) 
      part_2 <- rbind(combn(xr, m), x, deparse.level = 0) 
      cbind(part_1, part_2)
       }
  combn_n(letters[1:3])

[,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6]  
[1,] "a"  "a"  "b"  "c"  "c"  "b"   
[2,] "b"  "c"  "c"  "b"  "a"  "a"   
[3,] "c"  "b"  "a"  "a"  "b"  "c"   

| |
-1

What about

pmsa <- function(l) {
  pms <- function(n) if(n==1) return(list(1)) else unlist(lapply(pms(n-1),function(v) lapply(0:(n-1),function(k) append(v,n,k))),recursive = F)
  lapply(pms(length(l)),function(.) l[.])
}

This gives a list. Then

pmsa(letters[1:3])

| |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.