9

What is the difference between a listener and handler?

I have searched a lot, but I couldn't find a suitable explanation. Where do I use a listener and where do I use a handler in Android?

I have gone through the following link as well:

Are event handler, event listener, and event registration all referring to the same thing?

Where can I get a comparative discussion of these two items? Also, can anyone tell me what are the different kinds of listener and handler available?

  • for further explanation : i want to exchange some data between two processes.how do i do that? through a listener or a handler?? – scooby Jun 19 '12 at 12:43
  • A listener calls the handler. A listener invokes a new thread containing the handler logic once the action it is listening for is completed. So to talk between two processes, you need to register one process to the other, creating a listener object for the action you are waiting for, and then write a handler to execute the code to handle the event. – Hans Z Jun 19 '12 at 12:44
  • I have some data transfered to a process from the other.. i have processed the data and have to send it back. so how do i send it back.?? through broadcastevent?? – scooby Jun 19 '12 at 12:48
  • @KazekageGaara op linked that post in the question o_O – Hans Z Jun 19 '12 at 12:51
2

A number of ActionScript classes feature something called events. An event is raised by an object when a certain occurrence happens. For example, when someone hovers over a button symbol in a SWF, the Button.onRollOver event is raised for that particular Button instance. When the mouse is moved elsewhere, the Button.onRollOut event is raised for that same instance. These events take place whether or not anyone takes notice. If you want to actually do something in response to an event, you must manage it with an event handler or an event listener. The choice between these two is determined by the object — some objects expect handlers, some listeners — so hit the ol’ ActionScript Language Reference when in doubt. Handlers are relatively easy, but for some reason, listeners seem to perplex people at first.

Event Handlers

The most popular events probably belong to the Button and MovieClip classes, which happen to share many of the same (a movie clip can be a button, but not the other way around). To handle the Button.onRelease event, all you have to do is drag a button symbol to the Stage and give it an instance name via the Properties inspector. Use this name in a frame script to assign a function to the event.

myButton.onRelease = function() {
  // do something
}

The other Button events work the same way, as do the MovieClip events and all events that require event handlers.

Any number of events can be handled. Just assign a function to each event, as necessary. A button that responds to a roll over, release, and roll out, for example, might look like this …

myButton.onRollOver = function() {
  // do something
}
myButton.onRelease = function() {
  // do something
}
myButton.onRollOut = function() {
  // do something
}

Event Listeners

Managing event listeners requires a few more steps. A listener is accomplished with a generic Object instance. This object acts as a liaison between at least two others: the object that raises the event, and any objects listening for the event. Let’s look at a MovieClipLoader example.

var mcl:MovieClipLoader = new MovieClipLoader();

At this point, we’ve declared a variable, mcl, that points to an instance of MovieClipLoader. Now we’ll declare another variable, mclListener, that points to an instance of Object. (Sounds funny, I know, but we’re creating an Object object.)

var mclListener:Object = new Object();

This generic object will now become our liaison. At this point, the code looks very similar to the event handler approach.

mclListener.onLoadInit = function() {
  // do something
}

I could have picked any event from the MovieClipLoader class, it really doesn’t matter. The thing to notice here is that a generic object is handling the event on behalf of the operative class instance. With event handlers, the operative class instance handles its own events.

Now that we have our listener, and now that a function has been assigned to one of its events on behalf of our MovieClipLoader instance, we simply need to subscribe the listener to mcl.

mcl.addListener(mclListener);

Done. Let’s see that all in one take:

var mcl:MovieClipLoader = new MovieClipLoader();
var mclListener:Object = new Object();
mclListener.onLoadInit = function() {
  // do something
}
mcl.addListener(mclListener);

To listen for more than one event, just follow suit with the event handler approach.

var mcl:MovieClipLoader = new MovieClipLoader();
var mclListener:Object = new Object();
mclListener.onLoadStart = function() {
  // do something
}
mclListener.onLoadProgress = function() {
  // do something
}
mclListener.onLoadInit = function() {
  // do something
}
mcl.addListener(mclListener);

Ref: http://www.quip.net/blog/2006/flash/event-handlers-listeners

You may also check this yahoo answer

  • 3
    Didn't the OP ask what the difference in in Android, not ActionScript? – Brill Pappin Sep 3 '15 at 20:02
7

The basic difference is that event handlers let the originating object itself do something in response to the event, whereas event listeners let other objects do something in response to events originating in the object.

For example: your activity has a button. If you want your activity to handle when someone touches the button, you use an event listener (by doing btn.setOnTouchListener(...)). BUT, if you want to create a specialized button (e.g. one that looks like a dog and barks when touched), you can create a subclass of Button and implement its event handler, onTouchEvent(...). In this latter case, the button itself will handle its touch event.

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