129

So, if I try to remove elements from a Java HashSet while iterating, I get a ConcurrentModificationException. What is the best way to remove a subset of the elements from a HashSet as in the following example?

Set<Integer> set = new HashSet<Integer>();

for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    set.add(i);

// Throws ConcurrentModificationException
for(Integer element : set)
    if(element % 2 == 0)
        set.remove(element);

Here is a solution, but I don't think it's very elegant:

Set<Integer> set = new HashSet<Integer>();
Collection<Integer> removeCandidates = new LinkedList<Integer>();

for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    set.add(i);

for(Integer element : set)
    if(element % 2 == 0)
        removeCandidates.add(element);

set.removeAll(removeCandidates);

Thanks!

0

7 Answers 7

196

You can manually iterate over the elements of the set:

Iterator<Integer> iterator = set.iterator();
while (iterator.hasNext()) {
    Integer element = iterator.next();
    if (element % 2 == 0) {
        iterator.remove();
    }
}

You will often see this pattern using a for loop rather than a while loop:

for (Iterator<Integer> i = set.iterator(); i.hasNext();) {
    Integer element = i.next();
    if (element % 2 == 0) {
        i.remove();
    }
}

As people have pointed out, using a for loop is preferred because it keeps the iterator variable (i in this case) confined to a smaller scope.

7
  • 5
    I prefer for to while, but each to his/her own. Jul 10, 2009 at 15:57
  • 1
    I also use for myself. I used while to hopefully make the example clearer. Jul 10, 2009 at 15:57
  • 17
    I perfer for mostly because the iterator variable is then limited to the scope of the loop. Jul 10, 2009 at 16:10
  • 1
    If while is used then the iterator's scope is larger than it needs to be.
    – Steve Kuo
    Jul 10, 2009 at 17:42
  • 4
    I prefer the while because it looks cleaner to me. The scope of the iterator should not be an issue if you are factoring your code. See Becks book "Test Driven Development" or Fowler's "Refactoring" for more about factoring code.
    – nash
    Nov 4, 2009 at 16:05
27

The reason you get a ConcurrentModificationException is because an entry is removed via Set.remove() as opposed to Iterator.remove(). If an entry is removed via Set.remove() while an iteration is being done, you will get a ConcurrentModificationException. On the other hand, removal of entries via Iterator.remove() while iteration is supported in this case.

The new for loop is nice, but unfortunately it does not work in this case, because you can't use the Iterator reference.

If you need to remove an entry while iteration, you need to use the long form that uses the Iterator directly.

for (Iterator<Integer> it = set.iterator(); it.hasNext();) {
    Integer element = it.next();
    if (element % 2 == 0) {
        it.remove();
    }
}
4
  • @Shouldn't your code actually call it.next()? Jun 1, 2017 at 9:17
  • 1
    Thanks for that. Fixed.
    – sjlee
    Jun 1, 2017 at 22:38
  • At what point is 'element' instantiated? Feb 20, 2018 at 7:15
  • Ugh. Fixed. Thanks.
    – sjlee
    Feb 21, 2018 at 14:57
16

Java 8 Collection has a nice method called removeIf that makes things easier and safer. From the API docs:

default boolean removeIf(Predicate<? super E> filter)
Removes all of the elements of this collection that satisfy the given predicate. 
Errors or runtime exceptions thrown during iteration or by the predicate 
are relayed to the caller.

Interesting note:

The default implementation traverses all elements of the collection using its iterator(). 
Each matching element is removed using Iterator.remove().

From: https://docs.oracle.com/javase/8/docs/api/java/util/Collection.html#removeIf-java.util.function.Predicate-

1
  • 3
    An example: integerSet.removeIf(integer-> integer.equals(5)); Mar 3, 2017 at 7:56
10

you can also refactor your solution removing the first loop:

Set<Integer> set = new HashSet<Integer>();
Collection<Integer> removeCandidates = new LinkedList<Integer>(set);

for(Integer element : set)
   if(element % 2 == 0)
       removeCandidates.add(element);

set.removeAll(removeCandidates);
4
  • I would not recommend this as it introduces a hidden temporal coupling.
    – Romain F.
    Mar 4, 2014 at 12:44
  • 1
    @RomainF. - What do you mean by hidden temporal coupling? Do you mean thread safe? Second, neither I would recommend this but the solution does have its pro. Super easy to read and hence maintainable. Jun 1, 2017 at 9:15
  • Yes, the for-loop produces a side effect, but I agree that it may be the most readable solution, unless you are using Java 8. Otherwise, just use "removeIf" method.
    – Romain F.
    Jun 1, 2017 at 12:43
  • I think this answer misses the point that the first loop was only there to have a HashSet from which to remove certain elements.
    – KeithWM
    Jul 11, 2017 at 14:32
10

Like timber said - "Java 8 Collection has a nice method called removeIf that makes things easier and safer"

Here is the code that solve your problem:

set.removeIf((Integer element) -> {
    return (element % 2 == 0);
});

Now your set contains only odd values.

5

Here's the more modern streams approach:

myIntegerSet.stream().filter((it) -> it % 2 != 0).collect(Collectors.toSet())

However, this makes a new set, so memory constraints might be an issue if it's a really huge set.

EDIT: previous version of this answer suggested Apache CollectionUtils but that was before steams came about.

3
  • 1
    This answer really starts showing its age... There's a Java-8 way of doing this now which is arguably cleaner. Jun 16, 2016 at 14:01
  • Is there a better method to use, or were you just referring to the ability to use a lambda in place of an anonymous inner class?
    – qwerty
    Jan 24, 2021 at 22:02
  • 1
    Here's the more modern way: myIntegerSet.stream().filter((it) -> it % 2 != 0).collect(Collectors.toSet()) Jan 27, 2021 at 3:30
2

An other possible solution:

for(Object it : set.toArray()) { /* Create a copy */
    Integer element = (Integer)it;
    if(element % 2 == 0)
        set.remove(element);
}

Or:

Integer[] copy = new Integer[set.size()];
set.toArray(copy);

for(Integer element : copy) {
    if(element % 2 == 0)
        set.remove(element);
}
1
  • That (or creating an ArrayList out of the set) is the best solution if you happen to not only remove existing elements but also adding new ones to the set during the loop. Mar 7, 2016 at 17:40