135

I know that switch/select statements break automatically after every case. I am wondering, in the following code:

for {
    switch sometest() {
    case 0:
        dosomething()
    case 1:
        break
    default:
        dosomethingelse()
    }
}

Does the break statement exit the for loop or just the switch block?

186

Break statements, The Go Programming Language Specification.

A "break" statement terminates execution of the innermost "for", "switch" or "select" statement.

BreakStmt = "break" [ Label ] .

If there is a label, it must be that of an enclosing "for", "switch" or "select" statement, and that is the one whose execution terminates (§For statements, §Switch statements, §Select statements).

L:
  for i < n {
      switch i {
      case 5:
          break L
      }
  }

Therefore, the break statement in your example terminates the switch statement, the "innermost" statement.

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  • 4
    What's the use case of the break within select {} since only one case can be selected? – Julio Guerra Jun 16 '17 at 20:42
  • 2
    Because even if a single case is selected, it might have a longer implementation which uses break to terminate the execution of the case, much like you can return from anywhere in a function. – Tit Petric Aug 25 '17 at 9:28
  • wouldn't that be a bad desing? because go to statement is a bad desing, and switch/select statements break automatically – John Balvin Arias Sep 2 '18 at 3:25
51

A hopefully illustrative example:

loop:
for {
        switch expr {
        case foo:
                if condA {
                        doA()
                        break // like 'goto A'
                }

                if condB {
                        doB()
                        break loop // like 'goto B'                        
                }

                doC()
        case bar:
                // ...
        }
A:
        doX()
        // ...
}

B:
doY()
// ....
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13

Yes, break breaks the inner switch.

https://play.golang.org/p/SZdDuVjic4

package main

import "fmt"

func main() {

    myloop:for x := 0; x < 7; x++ {
        fmt.Printf("%d", x)
        switch {
        case x == 1:
            fmt.Println("start")
        case x == 5:
            fmt.Println("stop")
            break myloop
        case x > 2:
            fmt.Println("crunching..")
            break
        default:
            fmt.Println("idling..")
        }
    }
}
0idling..
1start
2idling..
3crunching..
4crunching..
5stop

Program exited.
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7

Just from a switch block. There's plenty of examples in Golang own code you can examine (compare inner break with outer break).

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  • both are broken links – Luke W Mar 29 '17 at 0:24
1

this should explain it.

for{
    x := 1
    switch {
    case x >0:
        fmt.Println("sjus")
    case x == 1:
        fmt.Println("GFVjk")
    default:
        fmt.Println("daslkjh")
    }
}
}

Runs forever

for{
    x := 1
    switch {
    case x >0:
        fmt.Println("sjus")
        break
    case x == 1:
        fmt.Println("GFVjk")
    default:
        fmt.Println("daslkjh")
    }
}
}

Again, runs forever

BUT

package main

import "fmt"

func main() {
d:
for{
x := 1
    switch {
    case x >0:
        fmt.Println("sjus")
        break d
    case x == 1:
        fmt.Println("GFVjk")
    default:
        fmt.Println("daslkjh")
    }
}
}

will print sjus ... clear ?

http://play.golang.org/p/GOvnfI67ih

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  • 3
    hmmm I included a go play link, which might be helpful. – Jasmeet Singh Jul 1 '14 at 20:21
0

It only exits the switch block.

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