5

I'd like to know if these are basically the same thing.

class ExampleClass {
    public:
        ExampleClass(Object& newObj) : obj(newObj) {}
    private:
        Object obj;
}

class ExampleClass2 {
    public:
        ExampleClass2(Object& newObj) : objReference(newObj) {}
    private:
        Object& objReference;
}

So would this not work with either of the classes?

ExampleClass* getExampleObject() {
    Object obj;
    return new ExampleClass(obj);
}

ExampleClass2* getExample2Object() {
    Object obj;
    return new ExampleClass2(obj);
}

void main() {
    ExampleClass* ec = getExampleObject();
    ExampleClass2* ec2 = getExample2Object();
    //Do something involving the member objects of ec and ec2
}

So are the member objects invalid after both getExampleObject methods? Doesn't the constructor of ExampleClass save a copy of the object referenced in its constructor?

  • 1
    your code does not compile, since you cannot assign pointers (as returned by getExampleObject and getExample2Object) to non-pointer variables ec and ec2. – SirDarius Jun 20 '12 at 10:14
  • Yeah, I'm sorry, I forgot the *'s. – user1468729 Jun 20 '12 at 10:25
8

ExampleClass is fine, as it takes a copy of the object referenced in its constructor argument.

ExampleClass2 requires that the object referenced in its constructor argument exist for the lifetime of the ExampleClass2 instance (as it stores a reference to the object, it does not copy it). If it does not, then the ExampleClass2 instance will have a dangling reference as soon as the object to which it refers is destructed. This is the case with the getExample2Object() function as obj is destructed when getExample2Object() returns.

  • 1
    Thanks. That's what I thought but this made me doubt myself: link – user1468729 Jun 20 '12 at 10:30
  • @user1468729, in that question myclass has std::string member, not a reference to a std::string. – hmjd Jun 20 '12 at 10:33
  • So does my first ExampleClass. Or am I missing something here? – user1468729 Jun 20 '12 at 10:43
  • @user1468729, and your ExampleClass is fine. The code in the other question is legal, I think the question was asking what if I stored reference. If you notice, the accepted (and correct) answer to that question also state to store a copy. – hmjd Jun 20 '12 at 10:47
  • Ok, thank you. I guess I missed the what if meaning. – user1468729 Jun 20 '12 at 10:52
0

I'd like to know if these are basically the same thing.

No, they are not. Example's constructor takes an object reference and constructs a member object to using the object passed. This object is not a reference but a copy. In case of Example2, you are actually making objReference refer to object passed in ctor's parameter. You are good only as long as newObj's lifetime.

The

Object obj;
return new ExampleClass2(obj);

is the classic case when it will fail. Once the function returns, you will have a dangling reference.

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