5

I have an ASP.NET usercontrol that implements the ValidationProperty attribute. This attribute successfully makes it possible for me to use a RequiredFieldValidator for my custom control, however on validation it causes a full postback rather than using client side javascript based validation.

Is there a way to prevent this and enable client side validation without using a custom validator?

This is the what my UserControl looks like.

<%@ Control Language="C#" AutoEventWireup="true" CodeBehind="ucBooleanRadio.ascx.cs" Inherits="MyCompany.Web.UserControls.ucBooleanRadio" %>

<div class="BooleanRadio">
    <input runat="server" id="radTrue" type="radio" name="BooleanRadio" value="True" /> Yes
    <input runat="server" id="radFalse" type="radio" name="BooleanRadio" value="False" /> No
</div>

[ValidationProperty("Checked")]
public partial class ucBooleanRadio : System.Web.UI.UserControl
{
    public Nullable<bool> Checked
    {
        get
        {
            if (radTrue.Checked || radFalse.Checked)
                return radTrue.Checked;
            else
                return null;
        }
        set
        {
            radTrue.Checked = value != null ? value.Value : false;
            radFalse.Checked = value != null ? !value.Value : false;                    
        }
    }
}

And this is how it is being used

<uc1:ucBooleanRadio ID="ucAgree" runat="server" />
<asp:RequiredFieldValidator ID="RequiredFieldValidator6" runat="server" CssClass="Validator" Display="Dynamic" ControlToValidate="ucAgree" InitialValue="" ErrorMessage="You must agree to continue."></asp:RequiredFieldValidator>

Page.Validate();
if (Page.IsValid)
{
    //Do stuff
}
1

Turns out, ASP.NET don't event care about element tag.
I've just looked through validation code and found this

function ValidatorGetValue(id) {
    var control;
    control = document.getElementById(id);
    if (typeof(control.value) == "string") {
        return control.value;
    }
    return ValidatorGetValueRecursive(control);
}

So

<div class="BooleanRadio" id="<%= ClientID %>" value="<%= radTrue.Checked? "true" : radFalse.Checked? "false" : "" %>">
    <% radTrue.Attributes["onclick"] = "document.getElementById('" + ClientID + "').value='true'"; %>
    <% radFalse.Attributes["onclick"] = "document.getElementById('" + ClientID + "').value='false'"; %>
    <input runat="server" id="radTrue" type="radio" name="BooleanRadio" value="True" /> Yes
    <input runat="server" id="radFalse" type="radio" name="BooleanRadio" value="False" /> No
</div>

actually works :\, as does

<div class="BooleanRadio" id="<%= ClientID %>">
    <input runat="server" id="radTrue" type="radio" name="BooleanRadio" value="True" /> Yes
    <input runat="server" id="radFalse" type="radio" name="BooleanRadio" value="False" /> No
</div>

And there is events autohooking - validated element (one with ClientID) and its children are wired to cause validation automatically (look ValidatorHookupControl).
That may result in:
1. user does something
2. validation is performed
3. value to validate is updated (after validation!)
First example with value on div behaves this way.

  • Oh wow, nice, that's actually a really nice way to go about it. I prefer your approach now. Thanks again for all your help! :-) – Maxim Gershkovich Jun 28 '12 at 23:55
1

For a simple client-side validation there should be an input element with corresponding name which value is to be validated. Example of how it could be done in your case:

<div class="BooleanRadio">
    <% radTrue.Attributes["onclick"] = "document.getElementsByName('" + UniqueID + "')[0].value='+'"; %>
    <input runat="server" id="radTrue" type="radio" name="BooleanRadio" value="True" /> Yes
    <% radFalse.Attributes["onclick"] = "document.getElementsByName('" + UniqueID + "')[0].value='-'"; %>
    <input runat="server" id="radFalse" type="radio" name="BooleanRadio" value="False" /> No
    <input name="<%= UniqueID %>" type="hidden" value="<%= radTrue.Checked? "+" : radFalse.Checked? "-" : "" %>" />
</div>
  • I'm not sure how this would solve my problem, could you please clarify? The only difference I see in this code is that the value is stored in a Hidden field. My UserControl would still expose the Checked property externally and I assume repeat the same behaviour? What am I missing? – Maxim Gershkovich Jun 21 '12 at 10:01
  • The value of this hidden field is what being validated client-side for your control (because it has that name - UniqueID of control from ControlToValidate). There is no control properties here (on client), and ValidationProperty attribute is of no use, so you have to implement some logic for that hidden field to reflect value you want to validate client-side. Have you tried my answer? – Leonid Jun 21 '12 at 10:48
  • Related question with accepted answer - link. – Leonid Jun 26 '12 at 4:17
  • Thank you for your guidance, please see my answer. – Maxim Gershkovich Jun 27 '12 at 3:23
1

OK, So after significant digging around in the architecture of the ASP.NET field validators and some guidance from the poster above I have finally found the solution.

Basically the answer above is correct barring a couple of changes.

Firstly the id that is set for the hidden text should not be in the Name field but rather the ID field. Further the ID that is populated inside of the Hidden field should not be the Page.UniqueID but rather the Page.ClientID for the UserControl in question.

The reason for this is that when a page that contains validators is loaded the following function is called by the ASP.NET framework.

function ValidatorHookupControlID(controlID, val) {
    if (typeof (controlID) != "string") {
        return;
    }
    var ctrl = document.getElementById(controlID); //NOTE THIS LINE
    if ((typeof (ctrl) != "undefined") && (ctrl != null)) {
        ValidatorHookupControl(ctrl, val);
    }
    else {
        val.isvalid = true;
        val.enabled = false;
    }
}

What the framework attempts to do is retrieve a control that has the same ID as the ControlToValidate property as set in the required field validator (which is actually Page.ClientID). It then uses this control in its validation functions (whether they be RequiredField, Compare, Regex and so on). If it finds such a control it enables the validator and performs validation against its value, if it doesn't it simply sets the validator to disabled.

In the end my code looks like this.

<%@ Control Language="C#" AutoEventWireup="true" CodeBehind="ucBooleanRadio.ascx.cs" Inherits="MyCompany.Web.UserControls.ucBooleanRadio" %>

<input id="<% =this.ClientID %>" type="hidden" value="" />
<asp:RadioButton runat="server" ID="radTrue" Text="Yes" GroupName="radio" />
<asp:RadioButton runat="server" ID="radFalse" Text="No" GroupName="radio" />    

<script language="javascript" type="text/javascript">
    $(function (e) {
        $("#<% =radTrue.ClientID %>").click(function (e) {
            $("#<% =this.ClientID %>").val("true");
        });
        $("#<% =radFalse.ClientID %>").click(function (e) {
            $("#<% =this.ClientID %>").val("false");
        });
    });
</script>

And the code behind remains unchanged. Hopefully this explains some of the mystery of whats going on to anyone who runs into the same problem.

  • This method of hooking events won't work inside UpdatePanel. Also, don't forget to set initial value for input, because it will be lost after postback. And small fix: Page.ClientID -> this.ClientID. Cheers! – Leonid Jun 27 '12 at 4:17
  • hmmmm. Very good point, you're saying it wont work because the event handlers are not rebound (with my approach) after the UpdatePanel is reloaded right? Thanks again for guiding me in the right direction! :-) – Maxim Gershkovich Jun 27 '12 at 4:23
0

Maxim, I've just been working on a similar problem.

I've found that you don't need the JavaScript the Validators will automatically iterate through the controls looking for a "value" that is set.

You must be using server side RadioButtons rather than HTML

If you're using CompositeControls then it will work automatically

If you're using Web User Controls (ascx files) it doesn't wrap the control with an ID so you need to add the following code to your control.

<div id='<%=ClientID %>'>

   Your radio button controls here...

</div>

Edit: I've just uploaded some quick sample code. Hope this helps! Sample Code

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