I have a DOM element with some/all of the following effects applied:

#elem {
  -webkit-transition: height 0.4s ease;
  -moz-transition: height 0.4s ease;
  -o-transition: height 0.4s ease;
  transition: height 0.4s ease;
}

I am writing a jQuery plugin that is resizing this element, I need to disable these effects temporarily so I can resize it smoothly.

What is the most elegant way of disabling these effects temporarily (and then re-enabling them), given they may be applied from parents or may not be applied at all.

up vote 407 down vote accepted

Short Answer

Use this CSS:

.notransition {
  -webkit-transition: none !important;
  -moz-transition: none !important;
  -o-transition: none !important;
  transition: none !important;
}

Plus either this JS (without jQuery)...

someElement.classList.add('notransition'); // Disable transitions
doWhateverCssChangesYouWant(someElement);
someElement.offsetHeight; // Trigger a reflow, flushing the CSS changes
someElement.classList.remove('notransition'); // Re-enable transitions

Or this JS with jQuery...

$someElement.addClass('notransition'); // Disable transitions
doWhateverCssChangesYouWant($someElement);
$someElement[0].offsetHeight; // Trigger a reflow, flushing the CSS changes
$someElement.removeClass('notransition'); // Re-enable transitions

... or equivalent JavaScript using raw DOM functions or whatever other framework you're working with.

Explanation

This is actually a fairly subtle problem.

First up, you probably want to create a 'notransition' class that you can apply to elements to set their *-transition CSS attributes to none. For instance:

.notransition {
  -webkit-transition: none !important;
  -moz-transition: none !important;
  -o-transition: none !important;
  transition: none !important;
}

(Minor aside - note the lack of an -ms-transition in there. You don't need it. The first version of Internet Explorer to support transitions at all was IE 10, which supported them unprefixed.)

But that's just style, and is the easy bit. When you come to try and use this class, you'll run into a trap. The trap is that code like this won't work the way you might naively expect:

// Don't do things this way! It doesn't work!
someElement.classList.add('notransition')
someElement.style.height = '50px' // just an example; could be any CSS change
someElement.classList.remove('notransition')

Naively, you might think that the change in height won't be animated, because it happens while the 'notransition' class is applied. In reality, though, it will be animated, at least in all modern browsers I've tried. The problem is that the browser is caching the styling changes that it needs to make until the JavaScript has finished executing, and then making all the changes in a single reflow. As a result, it does a reflow where there is no net change to whether or not transitions are enabled, but there is a net change to the height. Consequently, it animates the height change.

You might think a reasonable and clean way to get around this would be to wrap the removal of the 'notransition' class in a 1ms timeout, like this:

// Don't do things this way! It STILL doesn't work!
someElement.classList.add('notransition')
someElement.style.height = '50px' // just an example; could be any CSS change
setTimeout(function () {someElement.classList.remove('notransition')}, 1);

but this doesn't reliably work either. I wasn't able to make the above code break in WebKit browsers, but on Firefox (on both slow and fast machines) you'll sometimes (seemingly at random) get the same behaviour as using the naive approach. I guess the reason for this is that it's possible for the JavaScript execution to be slow enough that the timeout function is waiting to execute by the time the browser is idle and would otherwise be thinking about doing an opportunistic reflow, and if that scenario happens, Firefox executes the queued function before the reflow.

The only solution I've found to the problem is to force a reflow of the element, flushing the CSS changes made to it, before removing the 'notransition' class. There are various ways to do this - see here for some. The closest thing there is to a 'standard' way of doing this is to read the offsetHeight property of the element.

One solution that actually works, then, is

someElement.classList.add('notransition'); // Disable transitions
doWhateverCssChangesYouWant(someElement);
someElement.offsetHeight; // Trigger a reflow, flushing the CSS changes
someElement.classList.remove('notransition'); // Re-enable transitions

Here's a JS fiddle that illustrates the three possible approaches I've described here (both the one successful approach and the two unsuccessful ones): http://jsfiddle.net/2uVAA/131/

  • 5
    Excelente answer. Good job, and appreciated since I came up with the same problem. What if I wanted to remove only one type of transition? – rafamds Dec 16 '14 at 11:44
  • 2
    Your solution is right, but for those looking for more background information: stackoverflow.com/a/31862081/1026 – Nickolay Aug 8 '15 at 17:36
  • 2
    Minor minor aside, IE10 was the first stable version of IE to ship with unprefixed transitions. The pre-release versions, excluding the Release Preview, required the -ms- prefix for transitions, along with a slew of other things. That, I suspect, is one of the reasons the -ms- prefix appears today. The other, much more likely of course, reason is the usual cargo cult that we've all come to know and love about vendor prefixes. – BoltClock Feb 6 '17 at 17:15
  • 1
    Interesting that simply checking the offset height of an element triggers a reflow. Wish I knew this a year ago when I was banging my head against the wall with this same problem. Is this still considered the most ideal way of handling this? – Brett84c Apr 20 '17 at 18:21
  • But this won't work for :before and :after because you can't add classes for pseudo-elements. I do .notransition, .notransition:before, .notransition:after {transition: none !important;} and add class for element itself. But if you need to disable only pseudo-element's animation but not element's I'd recomend to add different classes for element e.g. .notransition, .notransition-before:before, .notransition-after:after {transition: none !important;} – Семушин Сергей Jun 19 '17 at 15:01

Add an additional CSS class that blocks the transition, and then remove it to return to the previous state. This make both CSS and JQuery code short, simple and well understandable.

CSS:

.notransition {
  -webkit-transition: none !important;
  -moz-transition: none !important;
  -o-transition: none !important;
  -ms-transition: none !important;
  transition: none !important;
}

!important was added to be sure that this rule will have more "weight", because ID is normally more specific than class.

JQuery:

$('#elem').addClass('notransition'); // to remove transition
$('#elem').removeClass('notransition'); // to return to previouse transition
  • 5
    -1 because this wasn't sufficient to solve the problem for me in Chrome or Firefox - if I have Javascript that adds the class, makes the changes, and removes the class, sometimes the changes still animate. I've spent the last hour or two studying this problem in some detail and will post an answer later with fiddles showing cases where the naive approach fails, plus a neat hack that fixes the solution here by forcing a reflow between making the changes and removing the 'notransition' class. – Mark Amery May 15 '13 at 10:26

I would advocate disabling animation as suggested by DaneSoul, but making the switch global:

/*kill the transitions on any descendant elements of .notransition*/
.notransition * { 
  -webkit-transition: none !important; 
  -moz-transition: none !important; 
  -o-transition: none !important; 
  -ms-transition: none !important; 
  transition: none !important; 
} 

.notransition can be then applied to the body element, effectively overriding any transition animation on the page:

$('body').toggleClass('notransition');
  • 2
    Actually this is the perfect option imo. Especially the * helps a lot, making sure that none of the sub animations are triggered. Thanks, upvoted. – SchizoDuckie Sep 25 '12 at 12:26
  • This is the right answer for situations where you just want to do all at once. For instance, I'm wanting to disable transitions while rotating on mobile and this is perfect for that. – Ben Lachman Feb 15 '13 at 5:09
  • I ended up using this in angularjs, in a somewhat complicated scenario, but by god this was so helpful after days of banging my head. – Aditya M P Jul 25 '13 at 20:15
  • 1
    Performance wise I cannot expect this to be a good idea at all. "Oh, just apply this to EVERYTHING on the page, that makes things easier!" – Lodewijk Aug 3 '14 at 13:19
  • 1
    Should probably select both ".notransition" and ".notransition *" to be fully effective. – Nathan Dec 27 '14 at 6:56

For a pure JS solution (no CSS classes), just set the transition to 'none'. To restore the transition as specified in the CSS, set the transition to an empty string.

// Remove the transition
elem.style.transition = 'none';

// Restore the transition
elem.style.transition = '';

If you're using vendor prefixes, you'll need to set those too.

elem.style.webkitTransition = 'none'

You can disable animation, transition, trasforms for all of element in page with this css code

var style = document.createElement('style');
style.type = 'text/css';
style.innerHTML = '* {' +
'/*CSS transitions*/' +
' -o-transition-property: none !important;' +
' -moz-transition-property: none !important;' +
' -ms-transition-property: none !important;' +
' -webkit-transition-property: none !important;' +
'  transition-property: none !important;' +
'/*CSS transforms*/' +
'  -o-transform: none !important;' +
' -moz-transform: none !important;' +
'   -ms-transform: none !important;' +
'  -webkit-transform: none !important;' +
'   transform: none !important;' +
'  /*CSS animations*/' +
'   -webkit-animation: none !important;' +
'   -moz-animation: none !important;' +
'   -o-animation: none !important;' +
'   -ms-animation: none !important;' +
'   animation: none !important;}';
   document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0].appendChild(style);

I think you could create a separate css class that you can use in these cases:

.disable-transition {
  -webkit-transition: none;
  -moz-transition: none;
  -o-transition: color 0 ease-in;
  -ms-transition: none;
  transition: none;
}

Then in jQuery you would toggle the class like so:

$('#<your-element>').addClass('disable-transition');
  • yes I think this is the best approach, in fact the plugin can inject that css block into the page – Sam Saffron Jun 21 '12 at 5:32
  • 3
    Are you sure without !important CLASS ruler will override ID one? – DaneSoul Jun 21 '12 at 5:33

does

$('#elem').css('-webkit-transition','none !important'); 

in your js kill it?

obviously repeat for each.

  • 1
    then you need to reset it after the fact, so you need to store it, which would lead to a fair amount of boiler plate – Sam Saffron Jun 21 '12 at 5:28

I'd have a class in your CSS like this:

.no-transition { 
  -webkit-transition: none;
  -moz-transition: none;
  -o-transition: none;
  -ms-transition: none;
  transition: none;
}

and then in your jQuery:

$('#elem').addClass('no-transition'); //will disable it
$('#elem').removeClass('no-transition'); //will enable it
  • 1
    Are you sure without !important CLASS ruler will override ID one? – DaneSoul Jun 21 '12 at 5:33
  • 1
    Yes, it will because now you're targeting #elem.no-transition which is more specific than just the id – Moin Zaman Jun 21 '12 at 13:04
  • 3
    @MoinZaman Erm, but you haven't targeted #elem.no-transition in your CSS, you've just targeted .no-transition. Perhaps you meant to write #elem.no-transition in your CSS? – Mark Amery May 15 '13 at 9:41

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