46

I have following code that I am compiling in a .NET 4.0 project

namespace ConsoleApplication1  
{  
    class Program  
    {  
        static void Main(string[] args)  
        {  

        }  
    }  

    public static class Utility  
    {  
        public static IEnumerable<T> Filter1(this IEnumerable<T> input, Func<T, bool> predicate)  
        {  
            foreach (var item in input)  
            {  
                if (predicate(item))  
                {  
                    yield return item;  
                }  
            }  
        }  
    }  
}  

but getting following errors. I have System.dll already included as default in references. What I may be doing wrong?

Error   1   The type or namespace name 'T' could not be found (are you missing a using directive or an assembly reference?) 

Error   2   The type or namespace name 'T' could not be found (are you missing a using directive or an assembly reference?) 

Error   3   The type or namespace name 'T' could not be found (are you missing a using directive or an assembly reference?) 
| |
43
public static class Utility 
{  
    public static IEnumerable<T> Filter1<T>( // Type argument on the function
       this IEnumerable<T> input, Func<T, bool> predicate)  
    {  

If you dont care if its an extension method or not, you can add a generic constrain to the class. My guess is you want the extension method.

public static class Utility<T> // Type argument on class
{  
    public static IEnumerable<T> Filter1( // No longer an extension method
       IEnumerable<T> input, Func<T, bool> predicate)  
    {  
| |
  • @PaulPhillips - I actually just tried it and I dont think you can. I removed that part of the answer. – SwDevMan81 Jun 21 '12 at 18:03
  • I got it to work in linqpad, although the calling is kind of clumsy. You have to do Utility<type>.Filter() – Paul Phillips Jun 21 '12 at 18:04
  • Hmm interesting. I just tried it in VS and it gave me an compilation error Extension methods must be defined in a non-generic static class. Maybe linqpad is doing it a bit differently – SwDevMan81 Jun 21 '12 at 18:06
  • Oh, my mistake. I did not do an extension method. But you can make a static class generic. – Paul Phillips Jun 21 '12 at 18:07
  • Ah ok, I'll add that to the answer, but I'm sure the OP wants the extension method. – SwDevMan81 Jun 21 '12 at 18:09
61

You have to put the type argument on the function itself.

public static IEnumerable<T> Filter1<T>(...)
| |
  • 3
    A naive question, why isn't the type inference smart enough to figure it out? IEnumerable<T> input is passed in as an argument, so T is known at execution time. – foresightyj Mar 31 '15 at 1:28
  • 1
    My guess programmers were lazy... I saw similar patterns in the past. – dvdmn Mar 3 at 20:32
16

You need to declare T, which occurs after the method name or class name. Change your method declaration to :

public static IEnumerable<T> 
    Filter1<T>(this IEnumerable<T> input, Func<T, bool> predicate) 
| |
2

I had the same error, but solution required was slightly different. I needed to change this:

public static void AllItemsSatisy(this CollectionAssert collectionAssert, ICollection<T> collection, Predicate<T> predicate) 
{ ... }

To this:

public static void AllItemsSatisy<T>(this CollectionAssert collectionAssert, ICollection<T> collection, Predicate<T> predicate) 
{ ... }
| |
  • Old Post I know but for others reading: The solution is the SAME as the accepted answer. Your code might be different but the answer is the same. <T> is on the Method. So the type can be passed in tot he arguments and the entire method. – Ken Aug 17 '19 at 8:26
1

< T > means a type of object

IEnumerable<yourObject>

Here you have more information: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/9eekhta0.aspx

| |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.