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When you make a new WCF project, sample service is generated for you. The default data contract is (I've just changed the string type field title):

[DataContract]
public class CompositeType
{
    bool boolValue = true;
    string name = "";

    [DataMember]
    public bool BoolValue
    {
        get { return boolValue; }
        set { boolValue = value; }
    }

    [DataMember]
    public string Name
    {
        get { return name; }
        set { name = value; }
    }
}

What is the point of having those private fields boolValue and name? Is it a good practice writing some data sanitizing or some other manipulations in contract, thus bloating it? It seems the only sane reason for me not writing to fields directly. So is it a bloatware or it has some reason behind it?

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In my opinion, DataContracts singular purpose should be to transfer data between domains. Validation/sanitizing logic should be outside the DataContract's responsibilities. Especially if the intent is to share/link the code file in multiple projects/platforms for reuse.

This also implies that you shouldn't have your DataContract object used elsewhere in your application. It should go through some kind of adapter or converter to read/write the content to your application-specific objects. Its in that conversion (or your application objects) where you can do some validation. The simpler your data-transfer layer the better.

Plausibly, you might add logging/debugging code in the setters/getters (preferably temporarily) to track data input/output as needed. So far, that's the only case I've felt OK to put anything other than simple properties in a DataContract object (and again, I only did so temporarily).

EDIT: As to why this is the default generated file, I'm not sure. My DataContract objects are always using automatic properties. I'd suggest maybe this was a throwback to .NET 2.0 before automatic properties were introduced, but WCF/DataContracts weren't introduced until 3.0 anyway.

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The same reason you ever write a getter and setter for any private value, to help aid encapsulation and allow you to manipulate the inner workings of your class without having to worry about outside members breaking since they were manipulating variables directly.

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The short answer is that the public properties allow you, the designer, to restrict the values before they can be assigned to your private fields, potentially saving you from dealing with unexpected data. Although most get and set methods are the same, they are frequently the first line of defense against bad data.

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  • ok, the question actually was whether to sanitize data in the data contract (means while sending it) or before sending the data. I believe that data contract may get bloated if I write the sanitizing logic in it. So you disagree? – Arnthor Jun 21 '12 at 21:30
  • I disagree. What you call bloat, other define as sound software engineering best practices. Yes, you are adding a few lines of code, but the defensive safeguards are most than worth it. Plus, we're not writing to ROM chips. We've got the processing power and bandwidth and memory to not sacrifice sturdiness at the altar of economy. – GrayFox374 Jun 21 '12 at 21:49
  • You didn't get me again. Data must be sanitized, question is will it be sanitized in data contracts or in some other place. For example, it's certainly not a sound engineering practice to write data sanitizing code in .ascx file, you do it in back-end .ascx.cs file. I'm not asking about getters, setters or validation. I've been around. Question was, where to do the validation. – Arnthor Jun 22 '12 at 6:33

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