101

If I have a struct like this:

typedef struct
{
    unsigned char c1;
    unsigned char c2;
} myStruct;

What would be the easiest way to initialize this struct to 0? Would the following suffice?

myStruct _m1 = {0};

or Would I need to explicitly init each member to 0?

myStruct _m2 = {0,0};
125

The first is easiest(involves less typing), and it is guaranteed to work, all members will be set to 0[Ref 1].
The second is more readable.

The choice depends on user preference or the one which your coding standard mandates.

[Ref 1] Reference C99 Standard 6.7.8.21:

If there are fewer initializers in a brace-enclosed list than there are elements or members of an aggregate, or fewer characters in a string literal used to initialize an array of known size than there are elements in the array, the remainder of the aggregate shall be initialized implicitly the same as objects that have static storage duration.

Good Read:
C and C++ : Partial initialization of automatic structure

  • 8
    Also, I am using = {}; However I am not sure if this is valid. – William Entriken Mar 19 '15 at 21:09
  • 11
    @FullDecent empty braces for initialization is a GNU extension. – a3f Sep 12 '15 at 18:13
  • 1
    Is this also true for pointers? Is zero-initialization the same as null-initialization in the case of char * (for example)? – rvk Oct 5 '16 at 14:30
  • 1
    It is not purely a mater of preference - maintainability plays a role. If the structure changes (members added or removed) the _m2 example makes less sense if there were more members, and would have to be updated if the number of members decreased. – Clifford Apr 4 '17 at 10:29
  • 2
    I got an error: "missing braces around initializer [-Werror=missing-braces]" probably because of an member array :/ – DrumM Feb 14 '18 at 11:07
28

If the data is a static or global variable, it is zero-filled by default, so just declare it myStruct _m;

If the data is a local variable or a heap-allocated zone, clear it with memset like:

memset(&m, 0, sizeof(myStruct));

Current compilers (e.g. recent versions of gcc) optimize that quite well in practice. This works only if all zero values (include null pointers and floating point zero) are represented as all zero bits, which is true on all platforms I know about (but the C standard permits implementations where this is false; I know no such implementation).

You could perhaps code myStruct m = {}; or myStruct m = {0}; (even if the first member of myStruct is not a scalar).

My feeling is that using memset for local structures is the best, and it conveys better the fact that at runtime, something has to be done (while usually, global and static data can be understood as initialized at compile time, without any cost at runtime).

  • 4
    There's no guarantee that setting all bytes of the struct to 0 will be equivalent to initializing all struct members with 0 though. On many platforms this will be true, but not universally. – Sander De Dycker Jun 22 '12 at 7:55
  • Can you share an example, Sander? Genuine curiosity. (Obviously, not universally true doesn't necessarily mean there's an easy-to-explain exception, but if there is...) – Steven Fisher Jun 22 '12 at 7:57
  • 2
    The C standard permits the null pointer (or a zero floating point number) to be represented in memory by something else than all zero bits. Very few and weird implementations are doing that (I cannot name any). – Basile Starynkevitch Jun 22 '12 at 7:59
  • -1, you might find the initialization that the OP asks about ugly, but it is exactly what is forseen by the standard and that can be easily optimized by all compilers. Then, the form {} is not valid C but only available in C++. – Jens Gustedt Jun 22 '12 at 8:08
  • 5
    @Steven : I can only think of obscure and/or old platforms. The C FAQ has a list of platforms that had a NULL pointer that wasn't all 0 bits : c-faq.com/null/machexamp.html. And then there's the possibility the platform is not using IEEE 754 to represent floating point values, but uses some other representation that doesn't have an all 0 bit 0.0 value - but admittedly I know of no such platform. – Sander De Dycker Jun 22 '12 at 8:32
17

See §6.7.9 Initialization:

21 If there are fewer initializers in a brace-enclosed list than there are elements or members of an aggregate, or fewer characters in a string literal used to initialize an array of known size than there are elements in the array, the remainder of the aggregate shall be initialized implicitly the same as objects that have static storage duration.

So, yes both of them work. Note that in C99 a new way of initialization, called designated initialization can be used too:

myStruct _m1 = {.c2 = 0, .c1 = 1};

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.