56

I think I'm going blind, because I can't figure out where the syntax error is in this code:

if( cell == nil ) {
    titledCell = [ [ [ TitledCell alloc ] initWithFrame:CGRectZero
        reuseIdentifier:CellIdentifier ] autorelease
    ];

    switch( cellNumber ) {
        case 1:
            NSString *viewDataKey = @"Name";
etc...

When I try to compile it, I'm getting an Error: syntax error before '*' token on the last line.

Sorry for such a basic question, but what am I missing?

  • 1
    What kind of variable is cellNumber? The switch statement is from C, so using Objective-C types can trip it up. – Jeff Kelley Jul 12 '09 at 4:29
  • 1
    C only supports integral-like objects for switch/case, and I'd expect a different error message if that were the problem here. – ephemient Jul 12 '09 at 4:32
  • Does Objective-C follow C99 (and C++) and allow you to declare variables anywhere, or can you only do so at the start of a block? If you are constrained to declare them at the start of a block, then you could fix your syntax error by putting a '{' after the ':' of 'case 1:' and a matching '}' before the end of the case. – Jonathan Leffler Jul 12 '09 at 4:35
  • I don't know if Objective-C is forked off of C89 or if it borrows C99/C++ constructs too. Either way, jumping over declarations is really scary... – ephemient Jul 12 '09 at 4:37
  • You can set C89 or C99 (or GNU99) as a build property in Xcode; Objective-C lays on top of your choice of C standards. – Jim Puls Jul 12 '09 at 5:12
68

I don't have a suitable Objective-C compiler on hand, but as long as the C constructs are identical:

switch { … } gives you one block-level scope, not one for each case. Declaring a variable anywhere other than the beginning of the scope is illegal, and inside a switch is especially dangerous because its initialization may be jumped over.

Do either of the following resolve the issue?

NSString *viewDataKey;
switch (cellNumber) {
    case 1:
        viewDataKey = @"Name";
    …
}

switch (cellNumber) {
    case 1: {
        NSString *viewDataKey = @"Name";
        …
    }
    …
}
  • 2
    wrt/ Declaring a variable anywhere other than the beginning of the scope is illegal. This is not true in C99. C99 both allows for this and defines the semantics of what happens when "control jumps past a declaration" and the value of that declaration in such cases. – johne Jul 25 '09 at 3:46
  • I forgot to indicate which option solved the problem, oops. I used the top one to solve the problem - I don't think I tested the second suggestion, which is too bad, because you guys look like you were having a great discussion! – JoBu1324 Sep 3 '09 at 8:35
  • More detail on why these work in stackoverflow.com/questions/1231198 – Quinn Taylor Sep 13 '11 at 4:56
20

You can't declare a variable at the beginning of a case statement. Make a test case that just consists of that and you'll get the same error.

It doesn't have to do with variables being declared in the middle of a block — even adopting a standard that allows that won't make GCC accept a declaration at the beginning of a case statement. It appears that GCC views the case label as part of the line and thus won't allow a declaration there.

A simple workaround is just to put a semicolon at the beginning of the case so the declaration is not at the start.

  • 1
    False. switch (0) { int i; } compiles perfectly fine even back in C89. – ephemient Jul 12 '09 at 4:39
  • Not false. I just ran your example from Aragorn's post through GCC and got the same error. – Chuck Jul 12 '09 at 4:59
  • I'm claiming that "can't declare a variable in a case statement" is false. Try giving GCC the tiny example in my previous comment. – ephemient Jul 12 '09 at 5:05
  • 1
    Oh, I see, you were talking about the case label specifically and not the switch. Confusing to talk about the "beginning" of it -- case is just a label, and as such can only label statements. That is a valid point. – ephemient Jul 12 '09 at 5:24
  • 6
    The poster of this answer is correct. The root of the problem lies in the C99 BNF grammar, which (loosely) defines a labeled statement as: ...: statement. In short, there is no way to get from statement to declaration. A compound-statement (ie, { ... }) (loosely) defines the ... part as zero or more block-items, with block-item (loosely) defined as a statement or declaration. Also, the comment by @Dan Olson is both wrong and does not apply to C99, which very clearly defines the semantics of inter-mixed declarations and statements wrt/ initialization (C99 6.8.6.1, etc). – johne Jul 25 '09 at 3:41
4

In C you only can declare variables at the begining of a block before any non-declare statements.

{
   /* you can declare variables here */

   /* block statements */

   /* You can't declare variables here */
}

In C++ you can declare variables any where you need them.

  • switch (1) { case 0: int i = 1; break; default: /* wtf is i? */; } Even if you can declare variables everywhere, inside a switch is dangerous. – ephemient Jul 12 '09 at 4:46
  • with visual studio 2008 compiling a c file. is -> error C2143: syntax error : missing ';' before 'type' =) – Aragorn Jul 12 '09 at 5:00
  • Skipping over initializers in C++ is even more dangerous than in C, and MSVC is more of a C++ compiler than a C compiler. I'm not surprised that it doesn't like this junk. – ephemient Jul 12 '09 at 5:07
  • In C mode (/TC) it gives the error and in C++ mode (/TP) it compile without error. =) – Aragorn Jul 12 '09 at 5:16
1

Might it not be valid to declare a variable within a switch block?

  • As I remarked on Chuck's answer: switch (0) { int i; } is valid C89, and Objective-C is a true superset of C (unlike C++), so everything legal in C (modulo stolen identifiers) is legal in Objective-C. – ephemient Jul 12 '09 at 4:41
1

You can create a variable within a switch statement but you will have to create it within a block so that the scope of that variable is defined.

Example:

switch(number){

    case 1:
        {
            // Create object here
            // object is defined only for the scope of this block
        }
        break;
    case 2:
        {
            // etc.
        }
        break;
    default:
        break;

}
  • This is a new answer to a very old question with an accepted answer. What does your answer provide that the others do not? – JAL Dec 22 '16 at 20:41
  • This was meant to be an alternative to the 1st switch statement presented in the accepted answer. At the time of posting I had not noticed the bracket inline with the case statement in the 2nd switch statement provided. – egarlock Dec 22 '16 at 20:53
0

How to solve the warning:

1.Insert one ; in the first line of your case block

2.Put codes inside braces

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