I have Googled a lot and found a lot of solutions, but none of them give me the correct week number for the 2012-12-31. Even the example on MSDN (link) fails.

2012-12-31 is Monday, therefore it should be Week 1, but every method I tried gives me 53. Here are some of the methods, that I have tried:

From the MDSN Library:

DateTimeFormatInfo dfi = DateTimeFormatInfo.CurrentInfo;
Calendar cal = dfi.Calendar;

return cal.GetWeekOfYear(date, dfi.CalendarWeekRule, dfi.FirstDayOfWeek);

Solution 2:

return new GregorianCalendar(GregorianCalendarTypes.Localized).GetWeekOfYear(date, CalendarWeekRule.FirstFourDayWeek, DayOfWeek.Monday);

Solution 3:

CultureInfo ciCurr = CultureInfo.CurrentCulture;
int weekNum = ciCurr.Calendar.GetWeekOfYear(dtPassed, CalendarWeekRule.FirstFourDayWeek, DayOfWeek.Monday);
return weekNum;

Update

The following method actually returns 1 when date is 2012-12-31. In other words, my problem was that my methods were not following the ISO-8601 standard.

// This presumes that weeks start with Monday.
// Week 1 is the 1st week of the year with a Thursday in it.
public static int GetIso8601WeekOfYear(DateTime time)
{
    // Seriously cheat.  If its Monday, Tuesday or Wednesday, then it'll 
    // be the same week# as whatever Thursday, Friday or Saturday are,
    // and we always get those right
    DayOfWeek day = CultureInfo.InvariantCulture.Calendar.GetDayOfWeek(time);
    if (day >= DayOfWeek.Monday && day <= DayOfWeek.Wednesday)
    {
        time = time.AddDays(3);
    }

    // Return the week of our adjusted day
    return CultureInfo.InvariantCulture.Calendar.GetWeekOfYear(time, CalendarWeekRule.FirstFourDayWeek, DayOfWeek.Monday);
}
  • 4
    How is week 1 at the end of the year? I mean, I see where you get it. But 53 makes sense to me. – benjer3 Jun 22 '12 at 10:47
  • In my code snippets I get the CultureInfo and stuff. I thought my program knows by then what calender I am using. (Here in Germany the 31st of December 2012 is in week 1 of 2013) – Amberlamps Jun 22 '12 at 11:19
  • This code doesn't work quite as it should try dates 31-dec-2016 for example or 1-jan-2016 – cavej03 Mar 24 '16 at 1:30
  • @cavej03 31-dec-2016 is week 52 and the GetIso8601WeekOfYear returns 52 so i guess it works correctly. – Muflix Dec 17 '16 at 19:25

11 Answers 11

up vote 239 down vote accepted

As noted in this MSDN page there is a slight difference between ISO8601 week and .Net week numbering.

You can refer to this article in MSDN Blog for a better explanation: "ISO 8601 Week of Year format in Microsoft .Net"

Simply put, .Net allow weeks to be split across years while the ISO standard does not. In the article there is also a simple function to get the correct ISO 8601 week number for the last week of the year.

Update The following method actually returns 1 for 2012-12-31 which is correct in ISO 8601 (e.g. Germany).

// This presumes that weeks start with Monday.
// Week 1 is the 1st week of the year with a Thursday in it.
public static int GetIso8601WeekOfYear(DateTime time)
{
    // Seriously cheat.  If its Monday, Tuesday or Wednesday, then it'll 
    // be the same week# as whatever Thursday, Friday or Saturday are,
    // and we always get those right
    DayOfWeek day = CultureInfo.InvariantCulture.Calendar.GetDayOfWeek(time);
    if (day >= DayOfWeek.Monday && day <= DayOfWeek.Wednesday)
    {
        time = time.AddDays(3);
    }

    // Return the week of our adjusted day
    return CultureInfo.InvariantCulture.Calendar.GetWeekOfYear(time, CalendarWeekRule.FirstFourDayWeek, DayOfWeek.Monday);
} 
  • 1
    @il_guru What if I wish the week starts with sunday?? Do i replace all "Monday" with "Sunday"?? – User2012384 Mar 17 '16 at 8:12
  • 2
    @User2012384 fyi, if you want to follow the ISO8601 standard the firstDayOfWeek should always be Monday. – Starceaker Apr 5 '16 at 9:07
  • 1
    @Starceaker you are wrong, ISO8601 states that the first week of the year is "the week with the year's first Thursday in it (the formal ISO definition)" – il_guru Apr 5 '16 at 10:23
  • 1
    If you look the second link (ISO 8601 Week of Year format in Microsoft .Net), you could find the answer to your question directly from Microsoft. An example is Monday 31/12/2007: with the .Net function it will return week number 53 of 2007 while for the ISO standard it is week number 1 of 2008 – il_guru Apr 11 '16 at 13:22
  • 1
    I've manually verified this to be correct for years 2012 to 2018 (assuming that epochconverter.com is correct). We should all rejoice this year that week 1 of 2018 actually started on the first of January for once! – Aidan Oct 21 at 10:39

There can be more than 52 weeks in a year. Each year has 52 full weeks + 1 or +2 (leap year) days extra. They make up for a 53th week.

  • 52 weeks * 7days = 364 days.

So for each year you have at least one an extra day. Two for leap years. Are these extra days counted as separate weeks of their own?

How many weeks there are really depends on the starting day of your week. Let's consider this for 2012.

  • US (Sunday -> Saturday): 52 weeks + one short 2 day week for 2012-12-30 & 2012-12-31. This results in a total of 53 weeks. Last two days of this year (Sunday + Monday) make up their own short week.

Check your current Culture's settings to see what it uses as the first day of the week.

As you see it's normal to get 53 as a result.

  • Europe (Monday -> Sunday): January 2dn (2012-1-2) is the first monday, so this is the first day of the first week. Ask the week number for the 1st of January and you'll get back 52 as it is considered part of 2011 last's week.

It's even possible to have a 54th week. Happens every 28 years when the 1st of January and the 31st of December are treated as separate weeks. It must be a leap year too.

For example, the year 2000 had 54 weeks. January 1st (sat) was the first one week day, and 31st December (sun) was the second one week day.

var d = new DateTime(2012, 12, 31);
CultureInfo cul = CultureInfo.CurrentCulture;

var firstDayWeek = cul.Calendar.GetWeekOfYear(
    d,
    CalendarWeekRule.FirstDay,
    DayOfWeek.Monday);

int weekNum = cul.Calendar.GetWeekOfYear(
    d,
    CalendarWeekRule.FirstDay,
    DayOfWeek.Monday);

int year = weekNum == 52 && d.Month == 1 ? d.Year - 1 : d.Year;
Console.WriteLine("Year: {0} Week: {1}", year, weekNum);

Prints out: Year: 2012 Week: 54

Change CalendarWeekRule in the above example to FirstFullWeek or FirstFourDayWeek and you'll get back 53. Let's keep the start day on Monday since we are dealing with Germany.

So week 53 starts on monday 2012-12-31, lasts one day and then stops.

53 is the correct answer. Change the Culture to germany if want to to try it.

CultureInfo cul = CultureInfo.GetCultureInfo("de-DE");
  • I know that it is possible that there are 53 weeks. But when you have sunday (12/30) and monday (12/31), don´t you count thuesday (01/01) also as part of the 53th week in the US? – Amberlamps Jun 22 '12 at 11:09
  • I have never seen a 54th week! – Amberlamps Jun 22 '12 at 11:09
  • Certain fiscal software packages do have them. – Christophe Geers Jun 22 '12 at 11:11
  • 1
    @TimSchmelter nice example, included it in the post – Christophe Geers Jun 22 '12 at 11:21
  • 1
    +1 for your deep thoughts on the issue, but the code snippet in the blog entry provided in a different answer actually solved my problem. – Amberlamps Jun 22 '12 at 11:35

This is the way:

public int GetWeekNumber()
{
    CultureInfo ciCurr = CultureInfo.CurrentCulture;
    int weekNum = ciCurr.Calendar.GetWeekOfYear(DateTime.Now, CalendarWeekRule.FirstFourDayWeek, DayOfWeek.Monday);
    return weekNum;
}

Most important for is the CalendarWeekRule parameter.

See here: https://msdn.microsoft.com/query/dev14.query?appId=Dev14IDEF1&l=IT-IT&k=k(System.Globalization.CalendarWeekRule);k(TargetFrameworkMoniker-.NETFramework

  • "Several people have noticed that Calendar.GetWeekOfYear() is almost like the ISO 8601 week when passed CalendarWeekRule.FirstFourDayWeek and DayOfWeek.Monday, however it is a little bit different. Specifically ISO 8601 always has 7 day weeks. " blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/shawnste/2006/01/24/… – Juha Palomäki Jan 31 '17 at 22:45

I'm going to play Necromancer here :-)

Since there doesn't seem to be a .Net-culture that yields the correct ISO-8601 week number, I'd rather bypass the built-in week determination altogether, and do the calculation manually, instead of attempting to correct a partially correct result.

What I ended up with is the following extension method:

/// <summary>
/// Converts a date to a week number.
/// ISO 8601 week 1 is the week that contains the first Thursday that year.
/// </summary>
public static int ToIso8601Weeknumber(this DateTime date)
{
    var thursday = date.AddDays(3 - date.DayOfWeek.DayOffset());
    return (thursday.DayOfYear - 1) / 7 + 1;
}

/// <summary>
/// Converts a week number to a date.
/// Note: Week 1 of a year may start in the previous year.
/// ISO 8601 week 1 is the week that contains the first Thursday that year, so
/// if December 28 is a Monday, December 31 is a Thursday,
/// and week 1 starts January 4.
/// If December 28 is a later day in the week, week 1 starts earlier.
/// If December 28 is a Sunday, it is in the same week as Thursday January 1.
/// </summary>
public static DateTime FromIso8601Weeknumber(int weekNumber, int? year = null, DayOfWeek day = DayOfWeek.Monday)
{
    var dec28 = new DateTime((year ?? DateTime.Today.Year) - 1, 12, 28);
    var monday = dec28.AddDays(7 * weekNumber - dec28.DayOfWeek.DayOffset());
    return monday.AddDays(day.DayOffset());
}

/// <summary>
/// Iso8601 weeks start on Monday. This returns 0 for Monday.
/// </summary>
private static int DayOffset(this DayOfWeek weekDay)
{
    return ((int)weekDay + 6) % 7;
}

First of all, ((int)date.DayOfWeek + 6) % 7) determines the weekday number, 0=monday, 6=sunday.

date.AddDays(-((int)date.DayOfWeek + 6) % 7) determines the date of the monday preceiding the requested week number.

Three days later is the target thursday, which determines what year the week is in.

If you divide the (zero based) day-number within the year by seven (round down), you get the (zero based) week number in the year.

In c#, integer calculation results are round down implicitly.

C# to Powershell port from code above from il_guru:

function GetWeekOfYear([datetime] $inputDate)
{
   $day = [System.Globalization.CultureInfo]::InvariantCulture.Calendar.GetDayOfWeek($inputDate)
   if (($day -ge [System.DayOfWeek]::Monday) -and ($day -le [System.DayOfWeek]::Wednesday))
   {
      $inputDate = $inputDate.AddDays(3)
   }

   # Return the week of our adjusted day
   $weekofYear = [System.Globalization.CultureInfo]::InvariantCulture.Calendar.GetWeekOfYear($inputDate, [System.Globalization.CalendarWeekRule]::FirstFourDayWeek, [System.DayOfWeek]::Monday)
   return $weekofYear
}
  • 1
    Could you explain your code? Code-only answers are generally not acceptable on StackOverflow, and as such are liable to be deleted. – Wai Ha Lee Oct 1 '15 at 0:20
  • @Wai Ha Lee the code is already explained. See post above from il_guru. I ported his code to powershell, so other people can use it in powershell because there are no good solution in powershell so far. – Rainer Oct 7 '15 at 11:29
  • If that's what you did, you should credit the original author in the answer itself. The answer you ported has better comments which you have presumably removed. Also, this isn't an answer to the question since the question did not mention PowerShell. – Wai Ha Lee Oct 7 '15 at 11:32
  • 1
    I did now @Wai Ha Lee. The question is already marked as answered, so this would be the same solution written in an other language. I made a favour for people, which are looking for an solution in Powershell language (I was looking hard for an solution in Powershell, but what I found was a solution in C#). The idea remains the same and the author gets the credit for it. – Rainer Oct 7 '15 at 11:39

The easiest way to determine the week number ISO 8601 style using c# and the DateTime class.

Ask this: the how-many-eth thursday of the year is the thursday of this week. The answer equals the wanted week number.

var dayOfWeek = (int)moment.DayOfWeek;
// Make monday the first day of the week
if (--dayOfWeek < 0)
    dayOfWeek = 6;
// The whole nr of weeks before this thursday plus one is the week number
var weekNumber = (moment.AddDays(3 - dayOfWeek).DayOfYear - 1) / 7 + 1;
var cultureInfo = CultureInfo.CurrentCulture;
var calendar = cultureInfo.Calendar;

var calendarWeekRule = cultureInfo.DateTimeFormat.CalendarWeekRule;
var firstDayOfWeek = cultureInfo.DateTimeFormat.FirstDayOfWeek;
var lastDayOfWeek = cultureInfo.LCID == 1033 //En-us
                    ? DayOfWeek.Saturday
                    : DayOfWeek.Sunday;

var lastDayOfYear = new DateTime(date.Year, 12, 31);

var weekNumber = calendar.GetWeekOfYear(date, calendarWeekRule, firstDayOfWeek);

 //Check if this is the last week in the year and it doesn`t occupy the whole week
return weekNumber == 53 && lastDayOfYear.DayOfWeek != lastDayOfWeek 
       ? 1  
       : weekNumber;

It works well both for US and Russian cultures. ISO 8601 also will be correct, `cause Russian week starts at Monday.

Good news! A pull request adding System.Globalization.ISOWeek to .NET Core was just merged and is currently slated for the 3.0 release. Hopefully it will propagate to the other .NET platforms in a not-too-distant future.

The type has the following signature, which should cover most ISO week needs:

namespace System.Globalization
{
    public static class ISOWeek
    {
        public static int GetWeekOfYear(DateTime date);
        public static int GetWeeksInYear(int year);
        public static int GetYear(DateTime date);
        public static DateTime GetYearEnd(int year);
        public static DateTime GetYearStart(int year);
        public static DateTime ToDateTime(int year, int week, DayOfWeek dayOfWeek);
    }
}

You can find the source code here.

  • Any idea when v 3.0 will be released? – Jacques Aug 1 at 8:25
  • "We are planning on releasing a first preview of .NET Core 3 later this year and the final version in 2019." (from the roadmap blog post) – khellang Aug 1 at 8:41
  • 1
    But based on the roadmap, there should be a 2.2 release this year as well, which should include these APIs. – khellang Aug 1 at 8:44

The question is: How do you define if a week is in 2012 or in 2013? Your supposition, I guess, is that since 6 days of the week are in 2013, this week should be marked as the first week of 2013.

Not sure if this is the right way to go. That week started on 2012 (On monday 31th Dec), so it should be marked as the last week of 2012, therefore it should be the 53rd of 2012. The first week of 2013 should start on monday the 7th.

Now, you can handle the particular case of edge weeks (first and last week of the year) using the day of week information. It all depends on your logic.

  • Okay, I can see your point. The thing is when I use 2013/01/07 in any of my methods, it say week 2. So, 2012/12/31 is week 53 and 2013/01/07 is week 2. You might think there is no week 1 of 2013. But when I try 2013/01/01 it says week 1. – Amberlamps Jun 22 '12 at 11:11
  DateTimeFormatInfo dfi = DateTimeFormatInfo.CurrentInfo;
  DateTime date1 = new DateTime(2011, 1, 1);
  Calendar cal = dfi.Calendar;

  Console.WriteLine("{0:d}: Week {1} ({2})", date1, 
                    cal.GetWeekOfYear(date1, dfi.CalendarWeekRule, 
                                      dfi.FirstDayOfWeek),
                    cal.ToString().Substring(cal.ToString().LastIndexOf(".") + 1));      

A year has 52 weeks and 1 day or 2 in case of a lap year (52 x 7 = 364). 2012-12-31 would be week 53, a week that would only have 2 days because 2012 is a lap year.

  • This is incorrect. The first day of the week of the year may fall on any day of the week, depending on how you count the weeks, the year may have a 54th week. – krowe2 Jul 17 at 20:22

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