13

What does the smode of scipy.optimize 'Positive directional derivative for linesearch' mean?

for example in fmin_slsqp http://docs.scipy.org/doc/scipy/reference/generated/scipy.optimize.fmin_slsqp.html

  • Please give a link to the documentation page. – Sven Marnach Jun 22 '12 at 11:59
16

These optimization algorithms typically work by choosing a descent direction, and then performing a line search to that direction. I think this message means that the optimizer got into a position where it did not manage to find a direction where the value of the objective function decreases (fast enough), but could also not verify that the current position is a minimum.

14

I still don't know what it means but how to solve it. Basically, the function that is optimized needs to return a smaller value.

F(x):
    ...
    return value / 10000000
  • 2
    The more general answer is that the function that is being optimized is poorly scaled. I think the ideal is that the function being optimized over should tend to give a mean somewhere in the range 1-5. For my usecase, I had to multiply by 1000. – jebob Jan 17 '18 at 13:02
  • I know this is an old question, but if you are dividing the function to be optimized by n to coax the method to work, what do you do with the values x in the solutions? – Windstorm1981 Nov 25 '18 at 2:44
  • 1
    @Windstorm1981, if you only scale the objective, then the solution values x should be good as is. If, however, you also scaled the input values, then you have to reverse the scaling at the end to get out the actual solution. For these problems it is actually best if all values, both inputs and objectives, are scaled to be order 1. It takes some effort to implement this scaling and un-scaling at the end, but if the optimization problem is large, this should help convergence a lot. – Mike Jan 1 '19 at 7:42
5

To avoid changing your function you can also try experimenting with the ftol and eps parameters. Changing ftol to a higher value is equivalent to changing the function to a smaller value.

  • better suited as comment – jjj Jun 12 '17 at 13:36
  • True that. I made a mistake when posting and did not know how to correct it. – danielrd Jun 13 '17 at 14:11
2

One situation in which you receive this error, is when

  1. x0 is outside the valid range you defined in bounds.
  2. and the unconstrained maximum is attained for values outside bounds.

I will set up a hypothetical optimization problem, run it with two different initial values and print the output of scipy.optimize:

import numpy as np
from scipy import optimize

H = np.array([[2., 0.],
              [0., 8.]])

c = np.array([0, -32])

x0 = np.array([0.5, 0.5])    # valid initial value
x1 = np.array([-1, 1.1])     # invalid initial value

def loss(x, sign=1.):
    return sign * (0.5 * np.dot(x.T, np.dot(H, x)) + np.dot(c, x))

def jac(x, sign=1.):
    return sign * (np.dot(x.T, H) + c)

bounds = [(0, 1), (0, 1)]

Now that loss function, gradient, x0 and bounds are in place, we can solve the problem:

def solve(start):
    res = optimize.minimize(fun=loss, 
                            x0=start, 
                            jac=jac, 
                            bounds=bounds,
                            method='SLSQP')
    return res



solve(x0)   # valid initial value
# fun: -27.999999999963507
# jac: array([ 2.90878432e-14, -2.40000000e+01])
# message: 'Optimization terminated successfully.'
# ...
#  status: 0
# success: True
# x: array([1.45439216e-14, 1.00000000e+00])

solve(x1)      # invalid initial value:
#  fun: -29.534653465326528
#  jac: array([ -1.16831683, -23.36633663])
#  message: 'Positive directional derivative for linesearch'
#  ...
#  status: 8
#  success: False
#  x: array([-0.58415842,  1.07920792])

As @pv. pointed out in the accepted answer, the algorithm can't verify that this is a minimum:

I think this message means that the optimizer got into a position where it did not manage to find a direction where the value of the objective function decreases (fast enough), but could also not verify that the current position is a minimum.

1

It's not a complete answer, but you can see the source code that generates the smode here:

https://github.com/scipy/scipy/blob/master/scipy/optimize/slsqp/slsqp_optmz.f

Assignments of mode = 8 (the "Positive directional derivative for linesearch" you are asking about) can be found in lines 412 and 486. If can figure out why they are assigned in the code, you've got your answer.

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