15

It's an interview question.

Given a number n, find out how many numbers have digit 2 in the range 0...n

For example ,

input = 13 output = 2 (2 and 12)

I gave the usual O(n^2) solution but is there a better approach.

is there any 'trick' formula that will help me to get the answer right away

  • 8
    O(n²)? If you mean, generate the numbers and check the digits, that's O(n lg n), since each number n is represented by O(lg n) digits. – Fred Foo Jun 22 '12 at 13:14
  • It's a permuttation question.. – Anil Kumar Arya Jul 1 '12 at 7:38
  • @FredFoo each number is represented by log10(n) digits, so it's O(nlog10(n)) (number of digits in a base 10 number is log10(n)) – ChaimKut Jan 7 at 20:51
27

Count the numbers that do not have the digit 2. Among the numbers less than 10k, there are exactly 9k of them. Then it remains to treat the numbers from 10k to n, where

10^k <= n < 10^(k+1)

which you can do by treating the first digits individually (the cases 2 and others have to be differentiated), and then the first 2 digits etc.

For example, for n = 2345, we find there are 9^3 = 729 numbers without the digit 2 below 1000. There are again 729 such numbers in the range from 1000 to 1999. Then in the range from 2000 to 2345, there are none, for a total of 1458, hence the numbers containing the digit 2 are

2345 - 1458 = 887
  • Could you explain how you got 9^k numbers, I'm not very good with combinatorics. – nikhil Jun 24 '12 at 14:06
  • 4
    If you write numbers with leading zeros, the numbers 0 to 10^k - 1 are precisely the numbers you can write with exactly k digits. For each of the digits, there are 9 (== 10 - 1) possible choices (0,1,3,4,5,6,7,8,9). The choices are independent, so the total number of choices is the product of the number of choices for each digit, 9*9*...*9 = 9^k. If you were after the numbers containing neither a digit 2 nor a digit 5, it would be 8^k (8 = 10 - 2). The same principle holds for representations of numbers in other bases. However, since numbers don't really have leading zeros, cont... – Daniel Fischer Jun 24 '12 at 14:24
  • 1
    ..., forbidding the digit 0 is slightly different. Then you can't add leading zeros to get all numbers to the same length, and the count of numbers below 10^k that don't have a digit 0 is 9^1 + 9^2 + 9^3 + ... + 9^k = 9 * (9^k - 1)/8. If you forbid 0 and d other digits, leaving e = 9-d eligible digits, you get e^1 + e^2 + ... + e^k = e * (e^k - 1)/(e-1). (Replace 9 by base-1 for bases other than 10.) – Daniel Fischer Jun 24 '12 at 14:29
  • Perfect thanks for the nice explanation. – nikhil Jun 24 '12 at 22:03
2

argument 'digit' is the one which we want to count and arg 'number' is till where we want to count. For eg: If we want to count occurrences of '1', from 0 to 12, call the function with digit=1, and number=12, and it will return the number of occurrences of '1'.

int countOccurrences(int digit, int number)
{
    int counter = 0;
    for(int i=1; i<number; i++)
    {
        int j = i;
        while(j > 0)
        {
            if(j%10 == digit)
                counter++;
            j /= 10;
        }
    }
    return counter;
}
  • Explain it with some explanation.. – Sankarann Feb 10 '14 at 7:32
  • countOccurrences(1,20)=3; //wrong – SMUsamaShah Jul 8 '14 at 0:32
  • Have you tried executing this method? It returns 12, on countOccurrences(1,20), not 3. – undeadlock Jul 15 '14 at 15:54
  • This counts the twos, not how many numbers have a two. E.G. when it gets to 22 it increments twice, not once, which is wrong. – w0mbat Jul 3 '15 at 1:45
0

Given the number with the digits ABCDEF you can count the number of '2's in the ranges [0,F], [0,E9], [0,D99], [0,C999], [0,B9999] and [0,A99999] and add them.

Then for the range [0, X9999...999], the top number T = X9999...999 can be written as (X+1) * 10<sup>nines</sup> -1.

The number of '2's in that range is:

((X >= 2 ? 1/(X + 1)) : 0) + nines/10 ) * (T + 1);

That is: if X >= 2, the fraction of numbers that have a '2' at the position nines+1 is 1/(X+1), In total there are (T+1)/(X+1) '2's at that position. If X < 2, then no number on [0..T] has a '2' at that position.

For the other digit positions, is easy to see that at every digit position, 1/10 of the numbers have a '2', so there are (T+1)/10 '2's at position 0, (T+1)/10 '2's at position 1, etc. In total, (T+1) * nines / 10.

The complexity of this solution is O(logN).

0

this is how I would go about coding my first draft (Python code)

def count2(n) :
    return [p for p in range(n+1) if '2' in str(p)]

and that will return you a list with the containing number.

In terms of performance it is not that bad, for n=10,000,000 an average iteration takes about 5.5 seconds

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