16

I have a list item with a button inside.

When the button is shown, the list item is not clickable anymore. To make it clickable again, I have replaced the button with a view. The problem is that, when the list item is clicked, the button changes background image (like if it is clicked). How can avoid this bad behaviour?

Thanks

  • Apparently you need android:focusable="false" for the button. This question is pretty common here – Raffaele Jun 22 '12 at 16:59
20

Actually I have just found a wonderful explaination: http://android.cyrilmottier.com/?p=525

The problem and the solution is very well explained there.

17

Set the following properties for you button

  android:focusable="false"
  android:focusableInTouchMode="false"

For ImageButton, also add the following to the parent view

  android:descendantFocusability="blocksDescendants" 
12

The part of the link provided by @Matroska that answers the question:
You must add

android:descendantFocusability="blocksDescendants"

to the parent ViewGroup that defines the layout of an item of your ListView.

Note: this will no longer allow you to focus on the inner button with hardware buttons. (sorry, I cannot comment yet)

2

You can try this:

             yourButton.setFocusable(false);
             yourButton.setFocusableInTouchMode(false);
0

Here is an example of a clickable button inside a ListView. If you want to download the project you can download the IntelliJ Gradle project from my web site: http://developersfound.com/ListButtonClickExample.zip

The custom adapter in this example has the click listener instead of the listener being inside the Fragment or Activity. It's done is such a way that there is only on listener object and all button are bound to them for efficiency.

Here is the ListItem layout:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<FrameLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    xmlns:tools="http://schemas.android.com/tools"
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="match_parent"
    tools:context="com.jc_systems.listbuttonclickexample.app.ItemFragment">

    <LinearLayout
        android:id="@+id/test_container"
        android:orientation="horizontal"
        android:layout_width="fill_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content">

        <ImageView
            android:id="@+id/image_list_image"
            android:layout_width="wrap_content"
            android:layout_height="wrap_content"
            android:src="@drawable/exaple_icon"
            android:layout_weight=".1"
            android:layout_gravity="left|top"/>

        <TextView
            android:id="@+id/lbl_list_item"
            android:layout_width="168dp"
            android:layout_height="wrap_content"
            android:text="I think this should take up two lines..."
            android:layout_marginLeft="5dp"
            android:layout_marginRight="5dp"
            android:gravity="center_vertical|center_horizontal"
            android:layout_gravity="center_vertical"/>

        <Button
            android:id="@+id/cmd_list_button"
            android:layout_width="wrap_content"
            android:layout_height="wrap_content"
            android:text="Hello"
            android:layout_weight="0.2"
            android:paddingLeft="0dp"
            android:paddingRight="0dp"
            android:paddingTop="0dp"
            android:paddingBottom="0dp"
            android:layout_gravity="right|top"/>

    </LinearLayout>

</FrameLayout>

And here is the CustomAdapter:

import android.app.Activity;
import android.app.AlertDialog;
import android.view.LayoutInflater;
import android.view.View;
import android.view.ViewGroup;
import android.widget.ArrayAdapter;
import android.widget.Button;
import android.widget.ImageView;
import android.widget.TextView;

import java.util.ArrayList;

public class MyCustomAdapter extends ArrayAdapter {

    private final ArrayList<FragmentItems> list;
    private static Activity context;
    private View.OnClickListener adaptrDynaListener = null;

    public MyCustomAdapter(Activity context, ArrayList<FragmentItems> list) {

        super(context, R.layout.fragment_items, list);
        this.context = context;
        this.list = list;

        adaptrDynaListener = new View.OnClickListener() {
            @Override
            public void onClick(View v) {

                String buttonText = ((Button) v).getText().toString();
                new AlertDialog.Builder(MyCustomAdapter.context).setTitle("Alert").setMessage(buttonText).setNeutralButton("OK", null).show();

            }

        };

    }

    static class ViewHolder {

        protected ImageView image_list_image;
        protected TextView lbl_list_item;
        protected Button cmd_list_button;

    }

    @Override
    public View getView(int position, View convertView, ViewGroup parent) {
        View view = null;
        ViewHolder viewHolder = new ViewHolder();

        if (convertView == null) {

            LayoutInflater inflator = context.getLayoutInflater();
            view = inflator.inflate(R.layout.fragment_items, null);
            viewHolder.image_list_image = (ImageView) view.findViewById(R.id.image_list_image);
            viewHolder.lbl_list_item = (TextView) view.findViewById(R.id.lbl_list_item);
            viewHolder.cmd_list_button = (Button) view.findViewById(R.id.cmd_list_button);
            viewHolder.cmd_list_button.setTag(viewHolder);
            view.setTag(viewHolder);

        }
        else {

            view = convertView;
            viewHolder = (ViewHolder) view.getTag();

        }

        ViewHolder holder = (ViewHolder) view.getTag();

        holder.lbl_list_item.setText(list.get(position).getMessage());
        holder.cmd_list_button.setText(list.get(position).getButtonText());
        holder.cmd_list_button.setOnClickListener(adaptrDynaListener);

        return view;

    }//public View getView(int position, View convertView, ViewGroup parent)

    public int getCount() {

        if(list.size() <= 0) {

            return 1;

        }

        return list.size();

    }

    public Object getItem(int position) {

        return position;

    }

    public long getItemId(int position) {

        return position;

    }

}

I've tested this Adapter pattern quite extensively and it seems very stable in ListView, ListActivities and ListFragments.

-1

You can create an xml file that contains the clicked behavior of the view. Create an xml file, custom_button.xml (or whatever you want to call it) and fill it with this code:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<selector xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android">

    <!-- Focused -->
    <item android:state_focused="true" android:state_pressed="false" android:color="@color/black"/>
    <!-- Pressed -->
    <item android:state_focused="false" android:state_pressed="true" android:color="@color/black"/>
    <!-- Focused+Pressed -->
    <item android:state_focused="true" android:state_pressed="true" android:color="@color/black"/>
    <!-- Disabled -->
    <item android:state_enabled="false" android:color="@color/dark_grey_text"/>
    <!-- Default -->
    <item android:color="@color/white"/>

</selector>

You can then change the

android:color=""

To

android:drawable=""

And assign them to any drawable resources you have in your drawable folder. Then in the xml file for your layout containing the view, add:

android:background="custom_button"

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.