29

I am generating some numbers (let's say, num) and writing the numbers to an output file using outf.write(num).

But the interpreter is throwing an error:

    outf.write(num)  
TypeError: argument 1 must be string or read-only character buffer, not int.  

How can I solve this problem?

2
  • 1
    Would you post the declaration of outf? Commented Jun 22, 2012 at 17:29
  • @octopusgrabbus outf = open('outdata.txt', 'w') guessing from the context (and of course the filename is made up :)
    – Levon
    Commented Jun 22, 2012 at 17:42

5 Answers 5

39

write() only takes a single string argument, so you could do this:

outf.write(str(num))

or

outf.write('{}'.format(num))  # more "modern"
outf.write('%d' % num)        # deprecated mostly

Also note that write will not append a newline to your output so if you need it you'll have to supply it yourself.

Aside:

Using string formatting would give you more control over your output, so for instance you could write (both of these are equivalent):

num = 7
outf.write('{:03d}\n'.format(num))

num = 12
outf.write('%03d\n' % num)          

to get three spaces, with leading zeros for your integer value followed by a newline:

007
012

format() will be around for a long while, so it's worth learning/knowing.

3
  • Don't worry, I got confused. It's the usage of % that requires a tuple for more than one parameter, not format().
    – JAB
    Commented Jun 22, 2012 at 18:27
  • Would you mind clarifying what you mean by "modern"? (If you clarify/change the answer, I'll delete this comment so the comments don't get messy) Commented Apr 9, 2018 at 7:00
  • 2
    @MechtEngineer Simply that using the format function is the more preferred way of formatting text over printf-like formatting in Python nowadays (I use both, probably printf slightly more, since I use it in Java, C, etc too). HTH
    – Levon
    Commented Apr 9, 2018 at 11:28
4

any of these should work

outf.write("%s" % num)

outf.write(str(num))

print >> outf, num
2
  • And two of these are deprecated. Commented Jun 22, 2012 at 17:14
  • @BlaXpirit One and a half, because % format is going to be here for long
    – joaquin
    Commented Jun 22, 2012 at 17:18
2
i = Your_int_value

Write bytes value like this for example:

the_file.write(i.to_bytes(2,"little"))

Depend of you int value size and the bit order your prefer

1
  • to_bytes(...) method "New in version 3.2."
    – Alex
    Commented Feb 23, 2019 at 17:24
1

Also you can use f-string formatting to write integer to file

For appending use following code, for writing once replace 'a' with 'w'.

for i in s_list:
    with open('path_to_file','a') as file:
        file.write(f'{i}\n')

file.close()
0
1
f = open ('file1.txt','a') ##you can also write here 'w' for create or writing into file
while True :
    no = int(input("enter a number (0 for exit)"))
    if no == 0 :
        print("you entered zero(0) ....... \nnow you are exit  !!!!!!!!!!!")
        break
    else :
        f.write(str(no)+"\n")

f.close()
   
f1 = open ('Ass1.txt','r')

print("\n content of file :: \n",f1.read())

f1.close()
   

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