52

Take for example the python built in pow() function.

xs = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8]

from functools import partial

list(map(partial(pow,2),xs))

>>> [2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 128, 256]

but how would I raise the xs to the power of 2?

to get [1, 4, 9, 16, 25, 49, 64]

list(map(partial(pow,y=2),xs))

TypeError: pow() takes no keyword arguments

I know list comprehensions would be easier.

2
  • 1
    another usage of partial starting from 2-nd argument is partial for method(s) omitting self argument Feb 12 '18 at 10:25
  • for methods you can use: def meth(cls, self,...) and then partial(meth, cls)
    – nadapez
    Apr 4 '21 at 1:11

12 Answers 12

50

No

According to the documentation, partial cannot do this (emphasis my own):

partial.args

The leftmost positional arguments that will be prepended to the positional arguments


You could always just "fix" pow to have keyword args:

_pow = pow
pow = lambda x, y: _pow(x, y)
6
  • 1
    if in python 4.X pow() is "fixed", we will all know where they got their idea from :)
    – beoliver
    Jun 23 '12 at 23:58
  • @beoliver: Actually, as of PEP-457, positional-only arguments are formalized into what seems to be a feature, so I would never expect a fix to pow
    – Eric
    Jul 26 '17 at 12:24
  • 4
    When using lambda here, you don't need the functools.partial() anymore.
    – danijar
    Feb 27 '18 at 19:01
  • What is this doing? The arguments have not been changed at all: i would have anticipated a reversal of the order of x,y -> y,x Oct 22 '19 at 20:28
  • Following up on my comment: should not one or other of lambda x,y and _pow(x,y) have the x,y reversed?? Oct 23 '19 at 14:13
19

I think I'd just use this simple one-liner:

import itertools
print list(itertools.imap(pow, [1, 2, 3], itertools.repeat(2)))

Update:

I also came up with a funnier than useful solution. It's a beautiful syntactic sugar, profiting from the fact that the ... literal means Ellipsis in Python3. It's a modified version of partial, allowing to omit some positional arguments between the leftmost and rightmost ones. The only drawback is that you can't pass anymore Ellipsis as argument.

import itertools
def partial(func, *args, **keywords):
    def newfunc(*fargs, **fkeywords):
        newkeywords = keywords.copy()
        newkeywords.update(fkeywords)
        return func(*(newfunc.leftmost_args + fargs + newfunc.rightmost_args), **newkeywords)
    newfunc.func = func
    args = iter(args)
    newfunc.leftmost_args = tuple(itertools.takewhile(lambda v: v != Ellipsis, args))
    newfunc.rightmost_args = tuple(args)
    newfunc.keywords = keywords
    return newfunc

>>> print partial(pow, ..., 2, 3)(5) # (5^2)%3
1
>>> print partial(pow, 2, ..., 3)(5) # (2^5)%3
2
>>> print partial(pow, 2, 3, ...)(5) # (2^3)%5
3
>>> print partial(pow, 2, 3)(5) # (2^3)%5
3

So the the solution for the original question would be with this version of partial list(map(partial(pow, ..., 2),xs))

5
  • 2
    nice, for some reason I never use repeat. and as I'm on 3.X, it's just list(map(pow, [1, 2, 3], itertools.repeat(2)))
    – beoliver
    Jun 23 '12 at 23:53
  • nice, I didn't know they changed map in Python3
    – kosii
    Jun 24 '12 at 0:26
  • 1
    The funny one is pretty clever in a somewhat horrifying way :P (Also, you're not really supposed to pass Ellipsis around to begin with, so that's not much of a disadvantage. Unless you count "using Ellipsis for something it's not meant to be used" a disadvantage.)
    – millimoose
    Jun 25 '12 at 22:57
  • 2
    after learning some functional programming, for me it looks like a bizarre way of function currying in python
    – kosii
    May 23 '14 at 20:12
  • @kosii That's exactly what it is. It's impressive that Python is flexible enough to facilitate many of these functional patterns.
    – josiah
    Sep 27 '18 at 16:04
17

Why not just create a quick lambda function which reorders the args and partial that

partial(lambda p, x: pow(x, p), 2)
2
  • 1
    I just found that method useful when defining a property (using property() function directly, rather than as a decorator), where I needed to default the second argument to a __setitem__() call.
    – Eric Smith
    Aug 8 '19 at 23:08
  • 4
    At that point, why partial it? Why not f = lambda p, x=2: pow(x, p). Or even f = lambda p: pow(2, p)
    – jobermark
    Dec 16 '20 at 22:40
8

You could create a helper function for this:

from functools import wraps
def foo(a, b, c, d, e):
    print('foo(a={}, b={}, c={}, d={}, e={})'.format(a, b, c, d, e))

def partial_at(func, index, value):
    @wraps(func)
    def result(*rest, **kwargs):
        args = []
        args.extend(rest[:index])
        args.append(value)
        args.extend(rest[index:])
        return func(*args, **kwargs)
    return result

if __name__ == '__main__':
    bar = partial_at(foo, 2, 'C')
    bar('A', 'B', 'D', 'E') 
    # Prints: foo(a=A, b=B, c=C, d=D, e=E)

Disclaimer: I haven't tested this with keyword arguments so it might blow up because of them somehow. Also I'm not sure if this is what @wraps should be used for but it seemed right -ish.

1
  • Major +1. I was tempted to select this answer, but I suppose I was thinking more about the inbuilt functools.partial. But this is definitely being saved. I like :)
    – beoliver
    Jun 23 '12 at 23:41
4

you could use a closure

xs = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8]

def closure(method, param):
  def t(x):
    return method(x, param)
  return t

f = closure(pow, 2)
f(10)
f = closure(pow, 3)
f(10)
0
3

You can do this with lambda, which is more flexible than functools.partial():

pow_two = lambda base: pow(base, 2)
print(pow_two(3))  # 9

More generally:

def bind_skip_first(func, *args, **kwargs):
  return lambda first: func(first, *args, **kwargs)

pow_two = bind_skip_first(pow, 2)
print(pow_two(3))  # 9

One down-side of lambda is that some libraries are not able to serialize it.

3
  • What do you mean with some libraries? I think no library is able to serialize them.
    – MSeifert
    Feb 27 '18 at 19:31
  • I'm often using ruamel.yaml and it serializes lambdas fine.
    – danijar
    Feb 27 '18 at 19:34
  • Okay, I was thinking about the built-in modules. Thanks for the clarification :)
    – MSeifert
    Feb 27 '18 at 19:35
2

One way of doing it would be:

def testfunc1(xs):
    from functools import partial
    def mypow(x,y): return x ** y
    return list(map(partial(mypow,y=2),xs))

but this involves re-defining the pow function.

if the use of partial was not 'needed' then a simple lambda would do the trick

def testfunc2(xs):
    return list(map(lambda x: pow(x,2), xs))

And a specific way to map the pow of 2 would be

def testfunc5(xs):
    from operator import mul
    return list(map(mul,xs,xs))

but none of these fully address the problem directly of partial applicaton in relation to keyword arguments

5
  • This should be added to the question, not posted as an answer.
    – user545424
    Jun 23 '12 at 23:05
  • yesterday I was advised to add my attempts as an answer as opposed to the question. It's a no win situation!
    – beoliver
    Jun 23 '12 at 23:07
  • 1
    I think here it's OK. You should phrase it more as "Here's one way to do it" rather than as an addition to the question. To a certain extent, pretend you're someone else answering.
    – Eric
    Jun 23 '12 at 23:17
  • Maybe take a look at meta.stackexchange.com/questions/17845/…
    – Eric
    Jun 23 '12 at 23:19
  • @Eric, just gave it a read. I think this answer is in keeping. I'll tweak it a bit
    – beoliver
    Jun 23 '12 at 23:25
1

As already said that's a limitation of functools.partial if the function you want to partial doesn't accept keyword arguments.

If you don't mind using an external library 1 you could use iteration_utilities.partial which has a partial that supports placeholders:

>>> from iteration_utilities import partial
>>> square = partial(pow, partial._, 2)  # the partial._ attribute represents a placeholder
>>> list(map(square, xs))
[1, 4, 9, 16, 25, 36, 49, 64]

1 Disclaimer: I'm the author of the iteration_utilities library (installation instructions can be found in the documentation in case you're interested).

1

The very versatile funcy includes an rpartial function that exactly addresses this problem.

xs = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8]
from funcy import rpartial
list(map(rpartial(pow, 2), xs))
# [1, 4, 9, 16, 25, 36, 49, 64]

It's just a lambda under the hood:

def rpartial(func, *args):
    """Partially applies last arguments."""
    return lambda *a: func(*(a + args))
1
  • 1
    Not "exactly". The second argument need not necessarily be the last one. Sep 12 '18 at 0:54
1

Even though this question was already answered, you can get the results you're looking for with a recipe taken from itertools.repeat:

from itertools import repeat


xs = list(range(1, 9))  # [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]
xs_pow_2 = list(map(pow, xs, repeat(2)))  # [1, 4, 9, 16, 25, 36, 49, 64]

Hopefully this helps someone.

0

If you can't use lambda functions, you can also write a simple wrapper function that reorders the arguments.

def _pow(y, x):
    return pow(x, y)

and then call

list(map(partial(_pow,2),xs))

>>> [1, 4, 9, 16, 25, 36, 49, 64]
0

Yes

if you created your partial class

class MyPartial:
    def __init__(self, func, *args):
        self._func = func
        self._args = args
        
    def __call__(self, *args):
        return self._func(*args, *self._args) # swap ordering
    
xs = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8]
list(map(MyPartial(pow,2),xs))

>>> [1, 4, 9, 16, 25, 36, 49, 64]

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