132

What's the difference between RANK() and DENSE_RANK() functions? How to find out nth salary in the following emptbl table?

DEPTNO  EMPNAME    SAL
------------------------------
10       rrr    10000.00
11       nnn    20000.00
11       mmm    5000.00
12       kkk    30000.00
10       fff    40000.00
10       ddd    40000.00
10       bbb    50000.00
10       ccc    50000.00

If in the table data having nulls, what will happen if I want to find out nth salary?

211

RANK gives you the ranking within your ordered partition. Ties are assigned the same rank, with the next ranking(s) skipped. So, if you have 3 items at rank 2, the next rank listed would be ranked 5.

DENSE_RANK again gives you the ranking within your ordered partition, but the ranks are consecutive. No ranks are skipped if there are ranks with multiple items.

As for nulls, it depends on the ORDER BY clause. Here is a simple test script you can play with to see what happens:

with q as (
select 10 deptno, 'rrr' empname, 10000.00 sal from dual union all
select 11, 'nnn', 20000.00 from dual union all
select 11, 'mmm', 5000.00 from dual union all
select 12, 'kkk', 30000 from dual union all
select 10, 'fff', 40000 from dual union all
select 10, 'ddd', 40000 from dual union all
select 10, 'bbb', 50000 from dual union all
select 10, 'xxx', null from dual union all
select 10, 'ccc', 50000 from dual)
select empname, deptno, sal
     , rank() over (partition by deptno order by sal nulls first) r
     , dense_rank() over (partition by deptno order by sal nulls first) dr1
     , dense_rank() over (partition by deptno order by sal nulls last) dr2
 from q; 

EMP     DEPTNO        SAL          R        DR1        DR2
--- ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ----------
xxx         10                     1          1          4
rrr         10      10000          2          2          1
fff         10      40000          3          3          2
ddd         10      40000          3          3          2
ccc         10      50000          5          4          3
bbb         10      50000          5          4          3
mmm         11       5000          1          1          1
nnn         11      20000          2          2          2
kkk         12      30000          1          1          1

9 rows selected.

Here's a link to a good explanation and some examples.

  • 13
    very good idea to use select union all from dual to generate sample data without creating any table – Jean-Christophe Blanchard Apr 8 '16 at 8:44
  • @Jean-ChristopheBlanchard although you could just as easily use a values clause. – Wildcard Nov 12 '16 at 5:23
  • 1
    @Wildcard In PG, yes. In Oracle, no. At least not as of 11. I haven't run into 12 in prod yet. – jpmc26 Jan 10 '17 at 6:06
  • Remove from dual for generating this data in Redshift – Gaurav Aug 24 '17 at 17:35
  • 3
    Ivan, RANK gives me an idea where I am relative to all those ahead of me. DENSE_RANK tells me the absolute rank. I may have the second highest salary, but there could be 100 people ahead of me. Which one is better depends on the question I'm answering. – DCookie Nov 24 '18 at 18:03
80

This article here nicely explains it. Essentially, you can look at it as such:

CREATE TABLE t AS
SELECT 'a' v FROM dual UNION ALL
SELECT 'a'   FROM dual UNION ALL
SELECT 'a'   FROM dual UNION ALL
SELECT 'b'   FROM dual UNION ALL
SELECT 'c'   FROM dual UNION ALL
SELECT 'c'   FROM dual UNION ALL
SELECT 'd'   FROM dual UNION ALL
SELECT 'e'   FROM dual;

SELECT
  v,
  ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY v) row_number,
  RANK()       OVER (ORDER BY v) rank,
  DENSE_RANK() OVER (ORDER BY v) dense_rank
FROM t
ORDER BY v;

The above will yield:

+---+------------+------+------------+
| V | ROW_NUMBER | RANK | DENSE_RANK |
+---+------------+------+------------+
| a |          1 |    1 |          1 |
| a |          2 |    1 |          1 |
| a |          3 |    1 |          1 |
| b |          4 |    4 |          2 |
| c |          5 |    5 |          3 |
| c |          6 |    5 |          3 |
| d |          7 |    7 |          4 |
| e |          8 |    8 |          5 |
+---+------------+------+------------+

In words

  • ROW_NUMBER() attributes a unique value to each row
  • RANK() attributes the same row number to the same value, leaving "holes"
  • DENSE_RANK() attributes the same row number to the same value, leaving no "holes"
  • 2
    That's so good :) – nanosoft Jun 26 '15 at 14:18
  • Error :SQL Error: ORA-00923: FROM keyword not found where expected – zloctb Aug 18 '15 at 8:07
  • @zloctb: Yes, thank you. Fixed – Lukas Eder Aug 18 '15 at 8:31
9
SELECT empno,
       deptno,
       sal,
       RANK() OVER (PARTITION BY deptno ORDER BY sal) "rank"
FROM   emp;

     EMPNO     DEPTNO        SAL       rank
---------- ---------- ---------- ----------
      7934         10       1300          1
      7782         10       2450          2
      7839         10       5000          3
      7369         20        800          1
      7876         20       1100          2
      7566         20       2975          3
      7788         20       3000          4
      7902         20       3000          4
      7900         30        950          1
      7654         30       1250          2
      7521         30       1250          2
      7844         30       1500          4
      7499         30       1600          5
      7698         30       2850          6


SELECT empno,
       deptno,
       sal,
       DENSE_RANK() OVER (PARTITION BY deptno ORDER BY sal) "rank"
FROM   emp;

     EMPNO     DEPTNO        SAL       rank
---------- ---------- ---------- ----------
      7934         10       1300          1
      7782         10       2450          2
      7839         10       5000          3
      7369         20        800          1
      7876         20       1100          2
      7566         20       2975          3
      7788         20       3000          4
      7902         20       3000          4
      7900         30        950          1
      7654         30       1250          2
      7521         30       1250          2
      7844         30       1500          3
      7499         30       1600          4
      7698         30       2850          5
7

rank() : It is used to rank a record within a group of rows.

dense_rank() : The DENSE_RANK function acts like the RANK function except that it assigns consecutive ranks.

Query -

select 
    ENAME,SAL,RANK() over (order by SAL) RANK
from 
    EMP;

Output -

+--------+------+------+
| ENAME  | SAL  | RANK |
+--------+------+------+
| SMITH  |  800 |    1 |
| JAMES  |  950 |    2 |
| ADAMS  | 1100 |    3 |
| MARTIN | 1250 |    4 |
| WARD   | 1250 |    4 |
| TURNER | 1500 |    6 |
+--------+------+------+

Query -

select 
    ENAME,SAL,dense_rank() over (order by SAL) DEN_RANK
from 
    EMP;

Output -

+--------+------+-----------+
| ENAME  | SAL  |  DEN_RANK |
+--------+------+-----------+
| SMITH  |  800 |         1 |
| JAMES  |  950 |         2 |
| ADAMS  | 1100 |         3 |
| MARTIN | 1250 |         4 |
| WARD   | 1250 |         4 |
| TURNER | 1500 |         5 |
+--------+------+-----------+
2
select empno
       ,salary
       ,row_number() over(order by salary desc) as Serial
       ,Rank() over(order by salary desc) as rank
       ,dense_rank() over(order by salary desc) as denseRank
from emp ;

Row_number() -> Used for generating serial number

Dense_rank() will give continuous rank but rank will skip rank in case of clash of rank.

2

The only difference between the RANK() and DENSE_RANK() functions is in cases where there is a “tie”; i.e., in cases where multiple values in a set have the same ranking. In such cases, RANK() will assign non-consecutive “ranks” to the values in the set (resulting in gaps between the integer ranking values when there is a tie), whereas DENSE_RANK() will assign consecutive ranks to the values in the set (so there will be no gaps between the integer ranking values in the case of a tie).

For example, consider the set {25, 25, 50, 75, 75, 100}. For such a set, RANK() will return {1, 1, 3, 4, 4, 6} (note that the values 2 and 5 are skipped), whereas DENSE_RANK() will return {1,1,2,3,3,4}.

1

Rank() SQL function generates rank of the data within ordered set of values but next rank after previous rank is row_number of that particular row. On the other hand, Dense_Rank() SQL function generates next number instead of generating row_number. Below is the SQL example which will clarify the concept:

Select ROW_NUMBER() over (order by Salary) as RowNum, Salary, 
RANK() over (order by Salary) as Rnk, 
DENSE_RANK() over (order by Salary) as DenseRnk from (
Select 1000 as Salary union all
Select 1000 as Salary union all
Select 1000 as Salary union all
Select 2000 as Salary union all
Select 3000 as Salary union all
Select 3000 as Salary union all
Select 8000 as Salary union all
Select 9000 as Salary) A

It will generate following output:

----------------------------
RowNum  Salary  Rnk DenseRnk
----------------------------
1       1000    1   1
2       1000    1   1
3       1000    1   1
4       2000    4   2
5       3000    5   3
6       3000    5   3
7       8000    7   4
8       9000    8   5
0

Rank and Dense rank gives the rank in the partitioned dataset.

Rank() : It doesn't give you consecutive integer numbers.

Dense_rank() : It gives you consecutive integer numbers.

enter image description here

In above picture , the rank of 10008 zip is 2 by dense_rank() function and 24 by rank() function as it considers the row_number.

protected by mrsrinivas Dec 27 '18 at 16:24

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