51

I have click events set up like this:

$('.dialogLink')
    .click(function () {
        dialog(this);
        return false;
    });

The all have a "return false"

Can someone explain what this does and if it's needed?

90

When you return false from an event handler it prevents the default action for that event and stops the event bubbling up through the DOM. That is, it is the equivalent of doing this:

$('.dialogLink')
   .click(function (event) {
       dialog(this);
       event.preventDefault();
       event.stopPropagation();
});

If '.dialogLink' is an <a> element then its default action on click is to navigate to the href. Returning false from the click handler prevents that.

As for whether it is needed in your case, I would guess the answer is yes because you want to display a dialog in response to the click rather than navigating. If the element you've put the click handler on does not have a default action on click (e.g., normally nothing happens when you click a div) then you needn't return false because there's nothing to cancel.

If you want to do something in response to the click but let the default navigation continue then do not return false.

Further reading:

  • Would it be the same if I coded in those two events into the dialog function? – Alan2 Jun 25 '12 at 6:26
  • 1
    Those two lines aren't events, they're calls to methods of the event object which you'll notice I've added as a parameter to the function. jQuery sets that parameter to the event object associated with whichever event happened. If you passed the event object to the dialog() function then it could call those methods, but I think it is much more maintainable if you do it directly where I've shown it. Having said that, I'd recommend you stick with the return false you already have: it's shorter. – nnnnnn Jun 25 '12 at 6:32
  • As someone who just ran into this issue and took a bit to realize what was going on, I would argue calling return false is not as clear as saying to preventDefault and stopPropagation. – aug May 9 '16 at 17:50
4

The return value of an event handler determines whether or not the default browser behaviour should take place as well. In the case of clicking on links, this would be following the link, but the difference is most noticeable in form submit handlers, where you can cancel a form submission if the user has made a mistake entering the information.

I don't believe there is a W3C specification for this. All the ancient JavaScript interfaces like this have been given the nickname "DOM 0", and are mostly unspecified. You may have some luck reading old Netscape 2 documentation.

The modern way of achieving this effect is to call event.preventDefault(), and this is specified in the DOM 2 Events specification.

So the right way would be:

$('.dialogLink')
   .click(function (e) {
       dialog(this);
       e.preventDefault();
       e.stopPropagation(); // Stop bubbling up
});
  • You mention the "modern" way but if it is just the same is it not better to code return false and save some bytes from the script :-) – Alan2 Jun 25 '12 at 6:27
  • If it's a jQuery event handler you can be sure that return false will do the job. – nnnnnn Jun 25 '12 at 6:28
  • Agreed with @nnnnnn. – Praveen Kumar Purushothaman Jun 25 '12 at 6:30
  • @Gemma, this is valid and specified by the W3C. :) So it is safe to use. But in jQuery, yeah, return false does the same job. :) – Praveen Kumar Purushothaman Jun 25 '12 at 6:31
-1

The return value of an event handler determines whether or not the default browser behaviour should take place as well. In the case of clicking on links, this would be following the link, but the difference is most noticeable in form submit handlers, where you can cancel a form submission if the user has made a mistake entering the information.

  • This adds nothing to the conversation, as this exact response, verbatim, was already provided in the distance past. – Sean Kendle Jan 22 at 14:27

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