56

I am removing text from a string and what to replace each line with a blank line.

Some background: I am writing a compare function that compares two strings. Its all working fine and are displayed in there two separate web browsers. When i try scroll down on my browsers the strings are different lengths, I want to replace the text i am removeing with a blank line so that my strings are the same length.

In the code below i am looking to count how many lines aDiff.Text has

Here is my code:

public string diff_prettyHtmlShowInserts(List<Diff> diffs)
    {
        StringBuilder html = new StringBuilder();

        foreach (Diff aDiff in diffs)
        {
            string text = aDiff.text.Replace("&", "&amp;").Replace("<", "&lt;")
              .Replace(">", "&gt;").Replace("\n", "<br>"); //&para;
            switch (aDiff.operation)
            {

                case Operation.DELETE:                              
                   //foreach('\n' in aDiff.text)
                   // {
                   //     html.Append("\n"); // Would like to replace each line with a blankline
                   // }
                    break;
                case Operation.EQUAL:
                    html.Append("<span>").Append(text).Append("</span>");
                    break;
                case Operation.INSERT:
                    html.Append("<ins style=\"background:#e6ffe6;\">").Append(text)
                        .Append("</ins>");
                    break;
            }
        }
        return html.ToString();
    }
1
  • This works but i need to have a new line for each of the old lines that just makes one new line for a whole string that could be 8 lines
    – Pomster
    Commented Jun 25, 2012 at 12:33

14 Answers 14

102

Method 1:

int numLines = aDiff.text.Length - aDiff.text.Replace _
                   (Environment.NewLine, string.Empty).Length;

Method 2:

int numLines = aDiff.text.Split('\n').Length;

Both will give you number of lines in text.

7
  • Thanks let me check it out :D
    – Pomster
    Commented Jun 25, 2012 at 12:34
  • The best overloaded method match for 'string.Split(params char[])' has some invalid arguments is the error i recived
    – Pomster
    Commented Jun 25, 2012 at 12:38
  • Sorry can't upvote yet, need the rep to be higher, but thanks for the help :)
    – Pomster
    Commented Jun 26, 2012 at 5:46
  • 13
    Note that as far as performance is concerned, splitting a string will be allocating space to create the array just so that it can count the final number of elements in the array. This is very inefficient and if you run that over a big enough input text it will actually generate OutOfMemoryExceptions. @GrahamBedford Answer below is the most correct one here.
    – Casey
    Commented Apr 12, 2016 at 14:10
  • 3
    There is a catch. If Environment.NewLine is \r\n then there is 2 characters length and it will result in double new lines.. So this will fix this problem int numLines = (aDiff.text.Length - aDiff.text.Replace _ (Environment.NewLine, string.Empty).Length) / Environment.NewLine.Length;
    – dkokkinos
    Commented Feb 7, 2021 at 20:48
25

You can also use Linq to count occurrences of lines, like this:

int numLines = aDiff.Count(c => c.Equals('\n')) + 1;

Late, but offers alternative to other answers.

1
  • 8
    Only answer here that does not create new unnecessary objects Commented Feb 25, 2019 at 0:44
18

A variant that does not alocate new Strings or array of Strings

private static int CountLines(string str)
{
    if (str == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("str");
    if (str == string.Empty)
        return 0;
    int index = -1;
    int count = 0;
    while (-1 != (index = str.IndexOf(Environment.NewLine, index + 1)))
        count++;

   return count + 1;
}
2
  • If a string ends with a newline, this method reports one too many lines. For "1\r\n2\r\n3\r\n" it reports 4 lines, for "1\r\n2\r\n3" it reports 3. My expectation is that there is not considered to be an additional line at the end when a string ends with a newline. Commented Dec 30, 2022 at 10:18
  • I tested the performance with one extremely long string. For that this method is a factor 1000 slower than the others. The others take a similar amount of time Commented Feb 14 at 21:29
8

Inefficient, but still:

var newLineCount = aDiff.Text.Split('\n').Length -1;
3
  • it doesn't even compile! var newLineCount = aDiff.Text.Split(new string[] {Environment.NewLine}, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries).Length;
    – ilmatte
    Commented Mar 19, 2013 at 11:06
  • 1
    Just use the newline character \n Commented Mar 19, 2013 at 11:09
  • Sorry, you're right it compiles. Yet Environment.NewLine translates to the right newline character for the platform in which the application is running: msdn.microsoft.com/it-it/library/…
    – ilmatte
    Commented Mar 21, 2013 at 14:18
7

I did a bunch of performance testing of different methods (Split, Replace, for loop over chars, Linq.Count) and the winner was the Replace method (Split method was slightly faster when strings were less than 2KB, but not much).

But there's 2 bugs in the accepted answer. One bug is when the last line doesn't end with a newline it won't count the last line. The other bug is if you're reading a file with UNIX line endings on Windows it won't count any lines since Environment.Newline is \r\n and won't exist (you can always just use \n since it's the last char of a line ending for UNIX and Windows).

So here's a simple extension method...

public static int CountLines(this string text)
{
    int count = 0;
    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(text))
    {
        count = text.Length - text.Replace("\n", string.Empty).Length;

        // if the last char of the string is not a newline, make sure to count that line too
        if (text[text.Length - 1] != '\n')
        {
            ++count;
        }
    }

    return count;
}
1
  • well I thinks this should be accepted answer if performance results are correct. but I still don't understand how single loop through string could be slower and I'm almost sure that it would be faster with unsafe code
    – rattrapper
    Commented Apr 6, 2020 at 10:00
7
int newLineLen = Environment.NewLine.Length;
int numLines = aDiff.text.Length - aDiff.text.Replace(Environment.NewLine, string.Empty).Length;
if (newLineLen != 0)
{
    numLines /= newLineLen;
    numLines++;
}

Slightly more robust, accounting for the first line that will not have a line break in it.

2
  • 1
    Why (when) would Environment.NewLine.Length return zero? Quote from msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… : A string containing "\r\n" for non-Unix platforms, or a string containing "\n" for Unix platforms.
    – poncha
    Commented Apr 13, 2016 at 6:02
  • I have no idea why it would be a length of zero. But when I divide by something that i'm not absolutely 100% will not be zero then I check anyway. But yes you are right as it stands on the current supported platforms it shouldn't be zero. Commented Apr 27, 2016 at 14:46
5

Late to the party here, but I think this handles all lines, even the last line (at least on windows):

Regex.Matches(text, "$", RegexOptions.Multiline).Count; 
4
using System.Text.RegularExpressions;

Regex.Matches(text, "\n").Count

I think counting the occurrence of '\n' is the most efficient way, considering speed and memory usage.

Using split('\n') is a bad idea because it makes new arrays of string so it's poor in performance and efficiency! specially when your string gets larger and contains more lines.

Replacing '\n' character with empty character and calculating the difference is not efficient too, because it should do several operations like searching, creating new strings and memory allocations etc.

You can just do one operation, i.e. search. So you can just count the occurrence of '\n' character in the string, as @lokimidgard suggested.

It worth mentioning that searching for '\n' character is better than searching for "\r\n" (or Environment.NewLine in Windows), because the former (i.e. '\n') works for both Unix and Windows line endings.

4

Efficient and cost least memory.

Regex.Matches( "Your String" , System.Environment.NewLine).Count ;

Off course, we can extend our string class

using System.Text.RegularExpressions ;

public static class StringExtensions
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Get the nummer of lines in the string.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>Nummer of lines</returns>
    public static int LineCount(this string str)
    {
        return Regex.Matches( str , System.Environment.NewLine).Count ;
    }
}

reference : µBio, Dieter Meemken

2
  • 2
    it did not count the last line if last line did not have '\r\n' Commented Oct 27, 2018 at 7:01
  • 1
    Like @muh saying, there should be a + 1 after Count. Otherwise you wouldn't get a line count of 1 for a single line string for example. Commented Sep 6, 2019 at 7:19
4
public static int CalcStringLines(string text)
{
    int count = 1;
    for (int i = 0; i < text.Length; i++)
    {
        if (text[i] == '\n') count++;
    }

    return count;
}

That's the fastest/easiest/no memory allocation way to do it...

4

I benchmarked all the answers.

Stack:

  • BenchmarkDotNet
  • .NET 6
  • Intel Core i7-9700K
  • HTML file with 50 lines
Method Mean Error StdDev Gen0 Gen1 Allocated
Test_Replace 978.1 ns 153.54 ns 8.42 ns 1.2722 - 7984 B
Test_IndexOfInCycle 336.0 ns 13.42 ns 0.74 ns - - -
Test_CycleOverString 2,815.7 ns 148.98 ns 8.17 ns - - -
Test_Split 1,253.2 ns 85.83 ns 4.70 ns 1.4648 0.0477 9192 B
Test_RegexMatchesCount 11,221.4 ns 1,196.62 ns 65.59 ns 1.3428 0.0305 8480 B
Test_CountCharUnsafe 3,054.4 ns 272.66 ns 14.95 ns - - -

The winner is IndexOfInCycle

private static int IndexOfInCycle(string str)
{
    int index = -1;
    int count = 0;
    while (-1 != (index = str.IndexOf('\n', index + 1)))
        count++;
    return count + 1;
}

UPDATE: there were errors in my benchmark, updated the results.

Also, I even tried iterating over string with unsafe it still loses to the IndexOf loop.

1
  • interested in int count = 0; for (int index = 0; index < str.Length; ++index) if (str[index] == '\n') ++count; // I will have to benchmark this if I remember Commented May 22 at 2:18
3

to make things easy, i put the solution from poncha in a nice extention method, so you can use it simply like this:

int numLines = aDiff.text.LineCount();

The code:

/// <summary>
/// Extension class for strings.
/// </summary>
public static class StringExtensions
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Get the nummer of lines in the string.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>Nummer of lines</returns>
    public static int LineCount(this string str)
    {
        return str.Split('\n').Length;
    }
}

Have fun...

2

You could use Regex. Try this code:

StringBuilder html = new StringBuilder();
//...
int lineCount = Regex.Matches(html.ToString(), Environment.NewLine).Count;
0

Here's my version, based on @NathanielDoldersum 's answer but modified to check for empty strings and more accurately count the last line. I consider a string ending with a newline to not have an additional line after that newline; the last line ends at the end of the string in that case.

It's only the third fastest method according to @AlexfromJitbit 's benchmark, but it doesn't allocate any memory.

        /// <summary>
        /// Counts the number of lines in a string. If there is a non-empty
        /// substring beyond the last newline character, it is also counted as a
        /// line, but if the string ends with a newline, it is not considered to have
        /// a final line after that newline.
        /// Empty and null strings are considered to have no lines.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="str">The string whose lines are to be counted.</param>
        /// <returns>The number of lines in the string.</returns>
        public static int countLines(string str)
        {
            if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(str))
            {
                return 0;
            }
            int count = 0;
            for (int i = 0; i < str.Length; i++)
            {
                if (str[i] == '\n') count++;
            }
            if (str.EndsWith("\n"))
            {
                return count;
            }
            return count + 1;
        }

Here's an XUnit unit test for it (which all pass of course):

        [Theory]
        [InlineData("1", 1)]
        [InlineData("1\n", 1)]
        [InlineData("1\r\n", 1)]
        [InlineData("1\n2\n3\n", 3)]
        [InlineData("1\n2\n3", 3)]
        [InlineData("1\r\n2\r\n3\r\n", 3)]
        [InlineData("1\r\n2\r\n3", 3)]
        [InlineData(null, 0)]
        [InlineData("", 0)]
        public void countLinesReturnsExpectedValue(string str, int expected)
        {
            Assert.Equal(expected, CUtils.countLines(str));
        }

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