374

I can print with printf as a hex or octal number. Is there a format tag to print as binary, or arbitrary base?

I am running gcc.

printf("%d %x %o\n", 10, 10, 10); //prints "10 A 12\n"
print("%b\n", 10); // prints "%b\n"
  • You can not do this, as far as I know, using printf. You could, obviously, write a helper method to accomplish this, but that doesn't sound like the direction you're wanting to go. – Ian P Sep 21 '08 at 20:09
  • There isn't a format predefined for that. You need to transform it yourself to a string and then print the string. – rslite Sep 21 '08 at 20:10
  • A quick Google search produced this page with some information that may be useful: forums.macrumors.com/archive/index.php/t-165959.html – Ian P Sep 21 '08 at 20:10
  • 8
    Not as part of the ANSI Standard C Library -- if you're writing portable code, the safest method is to roll your own. – tomlogic Jul 8 '10 at 16:00
  • One statement standard and generic (for any Integral type of any length) solution of the conversion to binary string on C++: stackoverflow.com/a/31660310/1814353 – luart Jul 27 '15 at 18:31

48 Answers 48

2

Yet another approach to print in binary: Convert the integer first.

To print 6 in binary, change 6 to 110, then print "110".

Bypasses char buf[] issues.
printf() format specifiers, flags, & fields like "%08lu", "%*lX" still readily usable.
Not only binary (base 2), this method expandable to other bases up to 16.
Limited to smallish integer values.

#include <stdint.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <inttypes.h>

unsigned long char_to_bin10(char ch) {
  unsigned char uch = ch;
  unsigned long sum = 0;
  unsigned long power = 1;
  while (uch) {
    if (uch & 1) {
      sum += power;
      }
   power *= 10;
   uch /= 2;
  }
  return sum;
}

uint64_t uint16_to_bin16(uint16_t u) {
  uint64_t sum = 0;
  uint64_t power = 1;
  while (u) {
    if (u & 1) {
      sum += power;
      }
    power *= 16;
    u /= 2;
  }
  return sum;
}

void test(void) {
  printf("%lu\n", char_to_bin10(0xF1));
  // 11110001
  printf("%" PRIX64 "\n", uint16_to_bin16(0xF731));
  // 1111011100110001
}
2

One statement generic conversion of any integral type into the binary string representation using standard library:

#include <bitset>
MyIntegralType  num = 10;
print("%s\n",
    std::bitset<sizeof(num) * 8>(num).to_string().insert(0, "0b").c_str()
); // prints "0b1010\n"

Or just: std::cout << std::bitset<sizeof(num) * 8>(num);

  • 1
    That's an idiomatic solution for C++ but he was asking for C. – danijar Oct 7 '15 at 19:14
2
#include <stdio.h>
#include <conio.h>

void main()
{
    clrscr();
    printf("Welcome\n\n\n");
    unsigned char x='A';
    char ch_array[8];
    for(int i=0; x!=0; i++)
    {
        ch_array[i] = x & 1;
        x = x >>1;
    }
    for(--i; i>=0; i--)
        printf("%d", ch_array[i]);

    getch();
}
  • recursion can be also used. – kapilddit Oct 19 '12 at 7:02
1

There is also an idea to convert the number to hexadecimal format and then to decode each hexadecimal cipher to four "bits" (ones and zeros). sprintf can do bit operations for us:

const char* binary(int n) {
  static const char binnums[16][5] = { "0000","0001","0010","0011",
    "0100","0101","0110","0111","1000","1001","1010","1011","1100","1101","1110","1111" };
  static const char* hexnums = "0123456789abcdef";
  static char inbuffer[16], outbuffer[4*16];
  const char *i;
  sprintf(inbuffer,"%x",n); // hexadecimal n -> inbuffer
  for(i=inbuffer; *i!=0; ++i) { // for each hexadecimal cipher
    int d = strchr(hexnums,*i) - hexnums; // store its decimal value to d
    char* o = outbuffer+(i-inbuffer)*4; // shift four characters in outbuffer
    sprintf(o,"%s",binnums[d]); // place binary value of d there
  }
  return strchr(outbuffer,'1'); // omit leading zeros
}

puts(binary(42)); // outputs 101010
1

Maybe someone will find this solution useful:

void print_binary(int number, int num_digits) {
    int digit;
    for(digit = num_digits - 1; digit >= 0; digit--) {
        printf("%c", number & (1 << digit) ? '1' : '0');
    }
}
1

Use:

char buffer [33];
itoa(value, buffer, 2);
printf("\nbinary: %s\n", buffer);

For more ref., see How to print binary number via printf.

  • 1
    A previous answer said "Some implementations provide itoa(), but it's not going to be in most"? – Peter Mortensen Dec 25 '17 at 21:12
1
void DisplayBinary(int n)
{
    int arr[8];
    int top =-1;
    while (n)
    {
        if (n & 1)
            arr[++top] = 1;
        else
            arr[++top] = 0;

        n >>= 1;
    }
    for (int i = top ; i > -1;i--)
    {
        printf("%d",arr[i]);
    }
    printf("\n");
}
1
void DisplayBinary(unsigned int n)
{
    int l = sizeof(n) * 8;
    for (int i = l - 1 ; i >= 0; i--) {
        printf("%x", (n & (1 << i)) >> i);
    }
}
  • I think this has been a great brainstorming session, I wish Gnu libc writers would pick the solution they like best and implement it. In 2018 I'm working at displaying binary numbers with xlib, binary as an output mode won't be obsolete as long as it's an input mode. And the width keeps changing. – Alan Corey May 28 '18 at 12:41
0

Even for the runtime libraries that DO support %b it seems it's only for integer values.

If you want to print floating-point values in binary, I wrote some code you can find at http://www.exploringbinary.com/converting-floating-point-numbers-to-binary-strings-in-c/ .

0
void PrintBinary( int Value, int Places, char* TargetString)
{
    int Mask;

    Mask = 1 << Places;

    while( Places--) {
        Mask >>= 1; /* Preshift, because we did one too many above */
        *TargetString++ = (Value & Mask)?'1':'0';
    }
    *TargetString = 0; /* Null terminator for C string */
}

The calling function "owns" the string...:

char BinaryString[17];
...
PrintBinary( Value, 16, BinaryString);
printf( "yadda yadda %s yadda...\n", BinaryString);

Depending on your CPU, most of the operations in PrintBinary render to one or very few machine instructions.

  • It makes more sense if you use a do { ... } while ( ... ); and postshift instead of preshifting. – Alexsander Akers Dec 7 '10 at 3:56
0

It might be not very efficient but it's quite simple. Try this:

tmp1 = 1;
while(inint/tmp1 > 1) {
    tmp1 <<= 1;
}
do {
    printf("%d", tmp2=inint/tmp1);
    inint -= tmp1*tmp2;
} while((tmp1 >>= 1) > 0);
printf(" ");
0
void binario(int num) {
  for(int i=0;i<32;i++){
    (num&(1<i))? printf("1"):
        printf("0");
  }  
  printf("\n");
}
0

Is there a printf converter to print in binary format?

There's no standard printf format specifier to accomplish "binary" output. Here's the alternative I devised when I needed it.

Mine works for any base from 2 to 36. It fans the digits out into the calling frames of recursive invocations, until it reaches a digit smaller than the base. Then it "traverses" backwards, filling the buffer s forwards, and returning. The return value is the size used or -1 if the buffer isn't large enough to hold the string.

int conv_rad (int num, int rad, char *s, int n) {
    char *vec = "0123456789" "ABCDEFGHIJKLM" "NOPQRSTUVWXYZ";
    int off;
    if (n == 0) return 0;
    if (num < rad) { *s = vec[num]; return 1; }
    off = conv_rad(num/rad, rad, s, n);
    if ((off == n) || (off == -1)) return -1;
    s[off] = vec[num%rad];
    return off+1;
}

One big caveat: This function was designed for use with "Pascal"-style strings which carry their length around. Consequently conv_rad, as written, does not nul-terminate the buffer. For more general C uses, it will probably need a simple wrapper to nul-terminate. Or for printing, just change the assignments to putchar()s.

0

The following function returns binary representation of given unsigned integer using pointer arithmetic without leading zeros:

const char* toBinaryString(unsigned long num)
{
    static char buffer[CHAR_BIT*sizeof(num)+1];
    char* pBuffer = &buffer[sizeof(buffer)-1];

    do *--pBuffer = '0' + (num & 1);
    while (num >>= 1);
    return pBuffer;
}

Note that there is no need to explicity set NUL terminator, because buffer repesents an object with static storage duration, that is already filled with all-zeros.

This can be easily adapted to unsigned long long (or another unsigned integer) by simply modifing type of num formal parameter.

The CHAR_BIT requires <limits.h> to be included.

Here is an example usage:

int main(void)
{
    printf(">>>%20s<<<\n", toBinaryString(1));
    printf(">>>%-20s<<<\n", toBinaryString(254));
    return 0;
}

with its desired output as:

>>>                   1<<<
>>>11111110            <<<
  • 1
    Careful, that's not re-entrant. Bad things can happen if you try to use it simultaneously from two different threads, or if you save the result and call it again (the second call will clobber the first result). – Keith Thompson Jan 19 '16 at 21:45
0

Use below function:

void conbin(int num){  
        if(num != 0)
        {
            conbin(num >> 1);     
            if (num & 1){
            printf("1");
            }
            else{
            printf("0");
            }
        }
    }
0

Here's is a very simple one:

int print_char_to_binary(char ch)
{
    int i;
    for (i=7; i>=0; i--)
        printf("%hd ", ((ch & (1<<i))>>i));
    printf("\n");
    return 0;
}
  • Note: How is "h" useful here? Look equally good without it. – chux Nov 12 '13 at 19:41
  • @chux, it's not quite useful actually. The argument gets promoted to int anyway so both %d and %hd would have to take one int from the varargs. – Shahbaz Nov 13 '13 at 13:29
  • Why the parentheses around (ch & (1<<i))>>i? – Peter Mortensen Dec 25 '17 at 21:14
0

Quick and easy solution:

void printbits(my_integer_type x)
{
    for(int i=sizeof(x)<<3; i; i--)
        putchar('0'+((x>>(i-1))&1));
}

Works for any size type and for signed and unsigned ints. The '&1' is needed to handle signed ints as the shift may do sign extension.

There are so many ways of doing this. Here's a super simple one for printing 32 bits or n bits from a signed or unsigned 32 bit type (not putting a negative if signed, just printing the actual bits) and no carriage return. Note that i is decremented before the bit shift:

#define printbits_n(x,n) for (int i=n;i;i--,putchar('0'|(x>>i)&1))
#define printbits_32(x) printbits_n(x,32)

What about returning a string with the bits to store or print later? You either can allocate the memory and return it and the user has to free it, or else you return a static string but it will get clobbered if it's called again, or by another thread. Both methods shown:

char *int_to_bitstring_alloc(int x, int count)
{
    count = count<1 ? sizeof(x)*8 : count;
    char *pstr = malloc(count+1);
    for(int i = 0; i<count; i++)
        pstr[i] = '0' | ((x>>(count-1-i))&1);
    pstr[count]=0;
    return pstr;
}

#define BITSIZEOF(x)    (sizeof(x)*8)

char *int_to_bitstring_static(int x, int count)
{
    static char bitbuf[BITSIZEOF(x)+1];
    count = (count<1 || count>BITSIZEOF(x)) ? BITSIZEOF(x) : count;
    for(int i = 0; i<count; i++)
        bitbuf[i] = '0' | ((x>>(count-1-i))&1);
    bitbuf[count]=0;
    return bitbuf;
}

Call with:

// memory allocated string returned which needs to be freed
char *pstr = int_to_bitstring_alloc(0x97e50ae6, 17);
printf("bits = 0b%s\n", pstr);
free(pstr);

// no free needed but you need to copy the string to save it somewhere else
char *pstr2 = int_to_bitstring_static(0x97e50ae6, 17);
printf("bits = 0b%s\n", pstr2);
-1

Do a function and call it

display_binary(int n)
{
    long int arr[32];
    int arr_counter=0;
    while(n>=1)
    {
        arr[arr_counter++]=n%2;
        n/=2;
    }
    for(int i=arr_counter-1;i>=0;i--)
    {
        printf("%d",arr[i]);
    }
}

protected by Bo Persson Aug 21 '11 at 14:02

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