13

I am aware that I can set null like

string val = null;

But I am wondering the other ways I can set it to null. Is there a funcion like String.null that I can use.

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  • 9
    Why would you need another way to do it?
    – Charleh
    Jun 25, 2012 at 17:09
  • 1
    why would doing string val = String.null be any better.. nulls have very little to do with strings Jun 25, 2012 at 17:09
  • You mean a static void StringUtils.SetNull(out string s) that sets s to null? That would be otherkill IMHO. What's wrong with assignment? Jun 25, 2012 at 17:09
  • @dash Say I changed it to something and then set it back to null...
    – Ajax3.14
    Jun 25, 2012 at 17:10
  • @Ajax3.14 - I'd just set it to null as you've done, or even String.Empty. Then, if I cared, at least I can check String.IsNullOrEmpty(val);
    – dash
    Jun 25, 2012 at 17:13

6 Answers 6

27

I think you are looking far String.Empty

string val = String.Empty;

Update: TheFuzzyGiggler comments are worth mentioning:

It's much better to set a string to empty rather than null. To avoid exceptions later. If you have to read and write a lot of strings you'll have null value exceptions all over the place. Or you'll have a ton of if(!string.isNullorEmpty(string)) which get annoying

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    Beat me to it! If OP reads this.. I've found it's MUCH better to set a string to empty rather than null.. To avoid exceptions later. If you have to read and write a lot of strings you'll have null value exceptions all over the place. Or you'll have a ton of if(!string.isNullorEmpty(string)) which get annoying. Jun 25, 2012 at 17:16
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    Thanks for the props. Just glad I can help. I'll let Asif take the rep glory. =) Jun 25, 2012 at 17:34
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    Null and String.Empty are certainly not interchangeable. If your system considers them the same, then by all means, use Empty but they are not the same. You can't just willy nilly use one where you can use the other. There is a difference between a user typing in an empty string and a user not typing in anything Jul 21, 2017 at 20:59
16

You can also use the default keyword.

string val = default(string);

Here is another SO question regarding the default keyword: What is the use of `default` keyword in C#?

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    ...which is the same as string val = (string)null;, i.e. a typed null reference.
    – Wormbo
    Jun 25, 2012 at 17:13
  • @Wormbo - correct. The nice thing about using default though, is that it works with both value types and reference types. Feb 13, 2017 at 19:19
4

null is not a special string value (there's String.Empty for ""), but a general object literal for the empty reference.

0

Obviously one more way to set something to null is to assign result of function that returns null:

string SomeFunctionThatReturnsNullString() {return null;}

string val = SomeFunctionThatReturnsNullString();
0

assign it to this value will make it a null ,(chose the right sql datatype , here its double )

    System.Data.SqlTypes.SqlDouble.Null
-1

Depending on your application you could use string.Empty. I'm always leery of initializing to null as the garbage collector is great, but not perfect, and could mark your string for garbage collection if used in some way that the garbage collector can't detect (this is very unlikely though).

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