11

To find the next odd number for an input the following code is being used:

a=5.4; // Input
b=Math.ceil(a); // Required to turn input to whole number 
b=b+(((b % 2)-1)*-1); // Gives 7

The ceil rounding function is required.

Is this safe and is there a more compact way to do this?

EDIT: When the input is already an odd whole number then nothing happens. For example 5.0 will return 5

  • 1
    Instead of b+(x*-1) use b-x. – Madara Uchiha Jun 25 '12 at 17:20
  • 1
    How about 5.0? What do you expect as next odd number? – VisioN Jun 25 '12 at 17:30
  • @VisioN The same number. 5.0 -> 5 (updated question) thanks. – zaf Jun 25 '12 at 18:12
  • b = Math.ceil(a) | 1; would be the most compact, I think. – Daniel Fischer Jun 25 '12 at 22:15
  • @DanielFischer And thats the answer I was really looking for. It includes the Math.ceil call! If you submit your comment as an answer I'll switch the accepted answer. Thank you. – zaf Jun 26 '12 at 7:21
9

At the question author's request:

The most compact way to achieve it is

b = Math.ceil(a) | 1;

First use ceil() to obtain the smallest integer not smaller than a, then obtain the smallest odd integer not smaller than ceil(a) by doing a bitwise or with 1 to ensure the last bit is set without changing anything else.

To obtain the smallest odd integer strictly larger than a, use

b = Math.floor(a+1) | 1;

Caveats:

Bit-operators operate on signed 32-bit integers in Javascript, so the value of a must be smaller than or equal to 2^31-1, resp. strictly smaller for the second. Also, a must be larger than -2^31-1.

If the representation of signed integers is not two's complement, but ones' complement or sign-and-magnitude (I don't know whether Javascript allows that, Java doesn't, but it's a possibility in C), the value of a must be larger than -1 -- the result of Math.ceil(a) resp. Math.floor(a+1) must be nonnegative.

14

How about just

b += b % 2 ^ 1;

The remainder after dividing by 2 will always be 0 or 1, so the ^ operator (exclusive-OR) flips it to the opposite.

(Also, (b & 1) ^ 1 would work too. Oh, I guess b = b ^ 1 would work for positive integers, but it'd be problematic for big integers.)

  • 2
    Huh? @Esailija if b is zero, the next odd number is 1. It's not supposed to keep finding subsequent odd numbers, or at least I don't see any indication of that in the OP. – Pointy Jun 25 '12 at 17:23
  • lol dunno why but I thought it was supposed to keep getting the next odd number just by running it :D – Esailija Jun 25 '12 at 17:26
  • b = b ^ 1 will work just fine. The inputs are small compared to max integer value. – zaf Jun 25 '12 at 18:19
  • @Pointy Sorry to accept another answer but hope you understand. You deserve the up votes. – zaf Jun 26 '12 at 13:45
6

Not really shorter, but this is more legible:

a=5.4;
b=Math.ceil(a);
b = b % 2 ? b : b + 1;
3

Try this:

a = 5.4
b = Math.ceil(a)
b = b%2 == 0 ? b+1 : b
1

Without Math.ceil() it can be done so:

b = a + a % 2 | 0 + 1;

NB. I consider next odd number of 5.0 as 7.

  • Sorry, should have added the corner case from the beginning. Updated question. Keep this answer... unless you get down voted ;) – zaf Jun 25 '12 at 18:14
1
y = Math.ceil((x - 1)/2)*2  + 1

Execute fn on http://www.intmath.com/functions-and-graphs/graphs-using-jsxgraph.php

  • +1 for the originality and graph link! – zaf Jun 25 '12 at 18:23

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